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MrPin

Cufflinks

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Has anyone thought of a 4mm thread :huh: wide head screw, washers and wingnut. You can buy a bag of hundreds for a few quid. :blink:

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I've had to resort to paperclips or treasury tags in the past (when I've cycled to work and remembered shirt but forgotten cuff links).

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Obviously not buying the right quality of clothes, a three quid shirt from Primark is about my limit. Don't really understand what cufflinks are about, never owned a pair.

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Obviously not buying the right quality of clothes, a three quid shirt from Primark is about my limit. Don't really understand what cufflinks are about, never owned a pair.

A large part of it is because back in the day shirt cuffs and collars were massively starched and were like cardboard. Often they were detachable and prepared separately from the shirt itself - I remember my dad saying at his first job he had 2 shirts but 6 collars - this allowed him to look presentable every day, etc (it was old-fashioned then, but he had a stuffy-kind of job). Anyway, because of the starching you can't use a button - so cufflinks for cuffs and studs for collars (which are hidden by the tie/band and don't need to be pretty).

This is of course completely irrelevant if you don't starch your cuffs and can thus use buttons. In that case they are just jewellery / there to make a statement about how suave you are / to show that you go to Eaton college not the dump down the road.

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A large part of it is because back in the day shirt cuffs and collars were massively starched and were like cardboard. Often they were detachable and prepared separately from the shirt itself - I remember my dad saying at his first job he had 2 shirts but 6 collars - this allowed him to look presentable every day, etc (it was old-fashioned then, but he had a stuffy-kind of job). Anyway, because of the starching you can't use a button - so cufflinks for cuffs and studs for collars (which are hidden by the tie/band and don't need to be pretty).

This is of course completely irrelevant if you don't starch your cuffs and can thus use buttons. In that case they are just jewellery / there to make a statement about how suave you are / to show that you go to Eaton college not the dump down the road.

Or in my case a repeat Screwfix customer.

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Most modern shirts simply are not designed for use with cufflinks. Personally I think some sort of ornamental pin would do the job as well. Modern shirt buttons are completely crap and seem to detach under the slightest pressure even on quite costly garments. They never seem to have the extra stitches that are needed to securely attach the button to the cloth. I think I do more repair sowing know than at any time of my life.

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I'm after some square & compass ones, or maybe just a big G.

Very stylish. Bet there are a few of those in junk shops.

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Cufflinks are part of the uniform in certain jobs. If you are an upmarket estate agent or head hunter, I reckon most of your customers expect you to wear double cuff shirts - requiring cuff links.

I've never needed them for a job. But they are part of the uniform for a concert performer, and I have to use them in most of the concerts I'm involved in.

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I've never needed them for a job. But they are part of the uniform for a concert performer, and I have to use them in most of the concerts I'm involved in.

Are you an imaginary bassoonist?

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Has anyone thought of a 4mm thread :huh: wide head screw, washers and wingnut. You can buy a bag of hundreds for a few quid. :blink:

The trouble with this idea, Mr Pin, is that solid cufflinks are rubbish. You have to get the really old-fashioned ones which are like two wide slender buttons joined by a chain.

The only solid ones I have are my grandfathers, really blingy 1970s things. I can't wear them for style or comfort! And I wear cufflinks almost every day.

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The trouble with this idea, Mr Pin, is that solid cufflinks are rubbish. You have to get the really old-fashioned ones which are like two wide slender buttons joined by a chain.

The only solid ones I have are my grandfathers, really blingy 1970s things. I can't wear them for style or comfort! And I wear cufflinks almost every day.

I quite like the chain ones. I have some. Do you ever wear a shirt with your cufflinks? ;):huh:

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Chain ones were a pain in the **** to put on. Much preferred the bar ones.

Haven't worn cuff links for years but have a good collection. Some super 70s blingtastic, and 80s gimmicks.

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Chain ones were a pain in the **** to put on. Much preferred the bar ones.

Haven't worn cuff links for years but have a good collection. Some super 70s blingtastic, and 80s gimmicks.

Take a trip to Screwfix and join the 21st century!

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Cufflinks are part of the uniform in certain jobs. If you are an upmarket estate agent or head hunter, I reckon most of your customers expect you to wear double cuff shirts - requiring cuff links.

If you don't wear them, you don't look the part, and someone else will get the business.

I think up until the late 90s double cuffs were the preserve of expensively educated types that were still a little old fashioned. I would say in the early 2000s that started going a bit down market (must admit that's when I started wearing them for work shirts!!), and they are now more the preserve of a recruitment agent or mobile phone sales man, the sort of person that has too much hair gel.

I am not replacing my double cuff shirts as they wear out.

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I think up until the late 90s double cuffs were the preserve of expensively educated types that were still a little old fashioned. I would say in the early 2000s that started going a bit down market (must admit that's when I started wearing them for work shirts!!), and they are now more the preserve of a recruitment agent or mobile phone sales man, the sort of person that has too much hair gel.

I am not replacing my double cuff shirts as they wear out.

No I'm a cheapskate! I bought the double cuff shirts because they were on cheap offers, and then found a use for cufflinks. Some of mine are rather nice!

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If you were an up-market estate agent, and you wore, say a short sleeve shirt, with a collection of biros in your top pocket. When someone walks into your agency, they'll think you're there fixing the phone or the computer.

Not if you've got the mandatory red trousers on.

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Never trust anyone who wears cufflinks.

It's on a par with wearing an expensive bling watch or having too many buttons undone on your shirt.

BTL landlord chancer uniform.

You wouldn't trust me then? :huh:

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Has anyone thought of a 4mm thread :huh: wide head screw, washers and wingnut. You can buy a bag of hundreds for a few quid. :blink:

For Evening Dress, It's Whitworth thread or nothing, you Europhile traitor.

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For Evening Dress, It's Whitworth thread or nothing, you Europhile traitor.

For sheer practicality I'd suggest 1/8 UNC - it has a coarser thread than either metric or whitworth and will be quicker to do up.

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Mr Whitworth would indeed have baulked at myriad designs of cheap press-studs and ugly buttons and insisted on standadisation of his Much Improved 55deg Cufflink design, as can be produced on any household lathe.

Anyway, all you chaps are doing it wrong.

When busy - um - entertaining the ladies, nothing says 'I'm in control of my cufflinks' like a clevis-pin-and-R-clip combo. Lockwire them if you must for the full ex-Spitfire pilot Douglas Bader effect - but only if you intend to get legless ...

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