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davidg

Coming Out Of Retirement

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Well after nearly 4 years sitting on me @rse watching TV I may be reentering the world of gainful employment tomorrow depending on how a meeting goes with a potential client.

That's the bad news, although it will please the missus.

Good news is it is only for an initial 2 months.

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I dont think I could retire.

I sort of like my work.

I could work a lot less! Say, 3 months in winter with 1 month spread across summer (May-Sep)

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Is this to do with Liverpool's goals crisis, and are you Michael Owen?

I could probably help Liverpool out if they are hiring. 90 minutes running around a grassy field, small kids for goal posts and all that would be a bit of a stretch.

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I dont think I could retire.

I sort of like my work.

I could work a lot less! Say, 3 months in winter with 1 month spread across summer (May-Sep)

I quite enjoyed my work today.

Nonetheless, were I able to, I'd retire in a heartbeat.

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I dont think I could retire.

I sort of like my work.

I could work a lot less! Say, 3 months in winter with 1 month spread across summer (May-Sep)

Have you stolen my cunning plan?

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Not quite that but my head of client accounting at one place (very senior and well paid) got the push after a take over. He went onto pushing trollies around a supermarket carpark and by all accounts absolutely loved it. Working outdoors, chatting to people, zero stress or hard thinking.

He didn't of course need the money, but wanted a big change and didn't want to retire.

I saw the appeal then and still do. Not that particular job but the outdoor, zero stress, let your mind wander and get back in touch with the elements nature of it.

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I quite enjoyed my work today.

Nonetheless, were I able to, I'd retire in a heartbeat.

I usually find my actual work pretty enjoyable. The trouble with having "a job" is all the crud that goes with it. In my recent roles, I've been fairly self-managed - but I'm still expected to broadly be around during office hours. Commuting in at sparrow-fart when I know there's not much to do, sucks. Or maybe I'll have a lot to do - but get a three-line whip to attend a day long anti-bribery and corruption indoctrination by PowerPoint session. Etc.

Hence me chucking my notice in before Christmas and why I'm currently lounging around on six months of gardening leave.

Once I've had a summer of fresh air, maybe I'll want to seek some sort of gainful employment again. But I find it hard to see myself becoming management permie again.

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Guest eight

Not quite that but my head of client accounting at one place (very senior and well paid) got the push after a take over. He went onto pushing trollies around a supermarket carpark and by all accounts absolutely loved it. Working outdoors, chatting to people, zero stress or hard thinking.

He didn't of course need the money, but wanted a big change and didn't want to retire.

I saw the appeal then and still do. Not that particular job but the outdoor, zero stress, let your mind wander and get back in touch with the elements nature of it.

As somebody who has ocassionally had to do these kind of "menial" jobs out of necessity and not as a leisure pursuit I'd call ******** (on his part, not yours). If a job was that easy it wouldn't exist. All of these bottom end, minimum wage gigs are stressful and often physically demanding along the lines of being a pro sportsman, and made even more so by managers who wouldn't be satisfied even if you took a bullet in the line of your job and still continued on best you could.

He should try kitchen portering for minimum wage and all the food scraps he can eat and see how relaxing he finds that. There's a realistic chance he'd be dead within a year.

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Not quite that but my head of client accounting at one place (very senior and well paid) got the push after a take over. He went onto pushing trollies around a supermarket carpark and by all accounts absolutely loved it. Working outdoors, chatting to people, zero stress or hard thinking.

He didn't of course need the money, but wanted a big change and didn't want to retire.

I saw the appeal then and still do. Not that particular job but the outdoor, zero stress, let your mind wander and get back in touch with the elements nature of it.

Oddly enough, one of the happiest, most fulfilled people I ever met was an ex broker who was now a bin man. He made enough money before leaving his job which he hated and felt was killing him. Loved getting up and out in the (mostly) fresh air, having the camaraderie of his team of men around him doing physical work.

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Someone I know....highly intelligent with well paid, very good responsible job dealing with people, long hours....threw in the towel and became a postman....never been happier or looked younger and fitter, up nice and early 5am (best most peaceful time of the day) home by midday then.........having no debt and can live on less see people have more freedoms and choices. ;)

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Guest eight

Oddly enough, one of the happiest, most fulfilled people I ever met was an ex broker who was now a bin man. He made enough money before leaving his job which he hated and felt was killing him. Loved getting up and out in the (mostly) fresh air, having the camaraderie of his team of men around him doing physical work.

Someone I know....highly intelligent with well paid, very good responsible job dealing with people, long hours....threw in the towel and became a postman....never been happier or looked younger and fitter, up nice and early 5am (best most peaceful time of the day) home by midday then.........having no debt and can live on less see people have more freedoms and choices. ;)

Is it the 1970's where you people live? Round here, binman is a wellish paid, highly automated activity, and since our post rarely arrives before 3pm I doubt the individual responsible has knocked off by midday too often.

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Is it the 1970's where you people live? Round here, binman is a wellish paid, highly automated activity, and since our post rarely arrives before 3pm I doubt the individual responsible has knocked off by midday too often.

It was the 90s. May have changed, but I still see a crew on the truck as they go by.

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It was the 90s. May have changed, but I still see a crew on the truck as they go by.

Sorry, might have come across a bit sharp there!

Actually I think binman might be as good as it gets, but consequently good luck getting the job if that is the case. Might as well buy lottery tickets.

I just really, really feel the need to knock on the head any idea that there are still jobs in the private sector where you can turn up, doss around having a whale of a time, and pick up a paycheck at the end of the week. Take the happy-go-lucky trolley collector - the daytime temperature here never rose above 1 degree yesterday, I bet working out in that is a laugh a minute. I also get really annoyed by the myth of unskilled work - it's a legacy of unionism and demarkation, that's all. All work that requires human intervention is skilled, by definition. Unskilled work is what animals do.

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Sorry, might have come across a bit sharp there!

Actually I think binman might be as good as it gets, but consequently good luck getting the job if that is the case. Might as well buy lottery tickets.

I just really, really feel the need to knock on the head any idea that there are still jobs in the private sector where you can turn up, doss around having a whale of a time, and pick up a paycheck at the end of the week. Take the happy-go-lucky trolley collector - the daytime temperature here never rose above 1 degree yesterday, I bet working out in that is a laugh a minute. I also get really annoyed by the myth of unskilled work - it's a legacy of unionism and demarkation, that's all. All work that requires human intervention is skilled, by definition. Unskilled work is what animals do.

I think some jobs that would be drudgery when compelled to do them, can be rather more fulfilling when you freely choose to do them.

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I think some jobs that would be drudgery when compelled to do them, can be rather more fulfilling when you freely choose to do them.

Yeah, perhaps. You can probably convince yourself that you're George Orwell in The Road To Wigan Pier. Or maybe you just wanna live like common people?

I had this job driving a delivery van for a bakery once. Believe me, anybody doing that job for that bloke for more than one week needed the money there and then. When I was working out my notice (which was more than they deserved, but you can't take chances at that level) a guy came for a trial - he was recently retired from Rothmans (notoriously staggeringly well paid/good conditions) and wanted something "to keep himself busy". He didn't even last the first morning.

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Yeah, perhaps. You can probably convince yourself that you're George Orwell in The Road To Wigan Pier. Or maybe you just wanna live like common people?

I had this job driving a delivery van for a bakery once. Believe me, anybody doing that job for that bloke for more than one week needed the money there and then. When I was working out my notice (which was more than they deserved, but you can't take chances at that level) a guy came for a trial - he was recently retired from Rothmans (notoriously staggeringly well paid/good conditions) and wanted something "to keep himself busy". He didn't even last the first morning.

I worked in a pub for a couple of summers in my early twenties. The pay was atrocious and it wasn't intellectually stimulating in any way. Unquestionably the best time of my life, and certainly something I would consider doing if I had no requirement to earn "decent" money.

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Yeah, perhaps. You can probably convince yourself that you're George Orwell in The Road To Wigan Pier. Or maybe you just wanna live like common people?

I had this job driving a delivery van for a bakery once. Believe me, anybody doing that job for that bloke for more than one week needed the money there and then. When I was working out my notice (which was more than they deserved, but you can't take chances at that level) a guy came for a trial - he was recently retired from Rothmans (notoriously staggeringly well paid/good conditions) and wanted something "to keep himself busy". He didn't even last the first morning.

Working for minimum wage is no pass to an easy life. People higher up the chain who have never been there commonly assume earning 1/4 of their old pay equals doing 1/4 of the workload which is never the case. Those at the bottom are by and large at the front end of the business and have to be productive to feed the managers and owners of the business.

My own father in his retirement said he was going to go and get a comfy job in the wine section of Asda (I think after reading an article on their ethics in a w/end telegraph supplement and having rolled out a gentle old fool 'greeter') the reality was nothing like the glossy brochure. The trial was demeaning from the welcome induction that involved using fancy dress and role play and then onto the first shift which he didn't finish. It's hard work and I doubt he even bothered to pick up the money that they owed him. FYI. He was the managing director of companies for the best part of his life.

I'm with HailtheTripod working behind a bar as I do now (well tonight and tomorrow night anyway). The job isn't particularly challenging, I go in do what I have to do and finish and that's that. No worrying about an in - tray awaiting my next shift. I absolutely loathed working in a stockbrokers and knowing what awaited me the next day and the day after that ###STRESS### of course I don't need the money and I'm sure things would be different if I were and had to do extra shifts/wait on tables during the day.

The pay isn't awful including the tips and once in a while I get given compliments from customers like last week a pretty young thing (I'm old enough to be her father) asked me out on a date and a lady asked for my phone number. It's the small things but they do lift my spirits. :D

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Not quite that but my head of client accounting at one place (very senior and well paid) got the push after a take over. He went onto pushing trollies around a supermarket carpark and by all accounts absolutely loved it. Working outdoors, chatting to people, zero stress or hard thinking.

He didn't of course need the money, but wanted a big change and didn't want to retire.

I saw the appeal then and still do. Not that particular job but the outdoor, zero stress, let your mind wander and get back in touch with the elements nature of it.

I think those disagreeing with this or saying it is implausible are missing the big picture somewhat.

Firstly, having been employed in a couple of low wage jobs I know that those jobs can be very stressful. But a fair amount of that stress comes from caring what your boss thinks of you and from stresses in your life generally caused by being on a low wage. You care what your boss thinks because you want to progress to a better job and he/she has some influence over this, so therefore has the ability to push you harder and cause you stress. You also care what your boss thinks because in a worst-case scenario you could be fired and that would be really bad for your life! So you wake up in your small rented flat, toddle off to do a stressful day's work, deal with things as best you can with your limited budget, it's a hard way of living.

I can imagine the chap in Frank's example lived in a comfortable house, mortgage free, and had other sources of income. In that kind of situation none of the above applies. He wakes up in a large well appointed house, goes to work and does what he does without much interest in what his boss thinks. He doesn't want to advance, he doesn't care if he gets fired, and without those cares then compared to his previous role and his previous high level or responsibility and stress what he does now is a piece of cake.

Thinking about it, the difference is security. If you're completely secure, no stress!

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I think those disagreeing with this or saying it is implausible are missing the big picture somewhat.

Firstly, having been employed in a couple of low wage jobs I know that those jobs can be very stressful. But a fair amount of that stress comes from caring what your boss thinks of you and from stresses in your life generally caused by being on a low wage. You care what your boss thinks because you want to progress to a better job and he/she has some influence over this, so therefore has the ability to push you harder and cause you stress. You also care what your boss thinks because in a worst-case scenario you could be fired and that would be really bad for your life! So you wake up in your small rented flat, toddle off to do a stressful day's work, deal with things as best you can with your limited budget, it's a hard way of living.

I can imagine the chap in Frank's example lived in a comfortable house, mortgage free, and had other sources of income. In that kind of situation none of the above applies. He wakes up in a large well appointed house, goes to work and does what he does without much interest in what his boss thinks. He doesn't want to advance, he doesn't care if he gets fired, and without those cares then compared to his previous role and his previous high level or responsibility and stress what he does now is a piece of cake.

Thinking about it, the difference is security. If you're completely secure, no stress!

Not so sure about that if internally you like to do a good job (and many do) - then if you cannot due to the environment around you it can be mega stressful - even if you would be quite willing to dump the job in an instant. If your internal morality/drive/sense of being clash with your work then simply switching off may not be possible - might not just be in your makeup.

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My own father in his retirement said he was going to go and get a comfy job in the wine section of Asda (I think after reading an article on their ethics in a w/end telegraph supplement and having rolled out a gentle old fool 'greeter') the reality was nothing like the glossy brochure. The trial was demeaning from the welcome induction that involved using fancy dress and role play and then onto the first shift which he didn't finish. It's hard work and I doubt he even bothered to pick up the money that they owed him. FYI. He was the managing director of companies for the best part of his life.

What did he expect? Special deference due to his previous important roles? To be a senior executive wine sales assistant exempt from anything he doesn't want to do? Wrong attitude IMO.

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