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Frank Hovis

Breadmaking Machine Technical Question

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I've been making my own bread for a couple of years now. The bread is great but after the novelty of spending however long kneading the dough each time rapidly wore off I bought a breadmaker which is great, so easy and the bread's as good if not better because of the standardisation.

However... the dough kneading hooks inside the bread making tin are turned by electric motors outside the tin and the linkage is a round interrupted cylinder into which the two prongs under each kneading hook sit.

After about 150 uses the prongs (softish iron or steel) have begun to wear very badly and I doubt they will last a further six months (I use it twice a week) before one breaks; meaning the machine is useless unless I can source another bread tin with prongs for it.

So are there any breadmaking machines that do not have this design weakness?

Other than this I'm totally happy with the machine (bought from Lidl) and thought that they were all much of muchness; with the weak point being the transfer of rotational force from the motors in the main unit to the kneading hooks within the tin through the base of the tin. It's certainly paid for itself many times over so I might just have to accept buying a new one every 18 months / two years.

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I own an LG bread maker. You can buy new paddles for them so cheaper than a new machine every so often.,.the machine cost around £50, I think. I've had it about 12 years.

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Ask lidl to source you a replacement.

The belt broke on my last one and we've not got a £180 panasonic one bought from a local auction house for hellavua lot less than that. It's got a ding in the front but works fine.
We might have been able to get a new belt but the lid was a bit crap at shutting on it so felt it was time to ditch it.

The first one I had was an ultra cheap one from one of the supermarkets. Nothing wrong with that.

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I own an LG bread maker. You can buy new paddles for them so cheaper than a new machine every so often.,.the machine cost around £50, I think. I've had it about 12 years.

It's not the paddles BB, it's the two wings under each (and below the base of the tin) that transfer the drive to them that are being worn away. If it was just one I'd say dodgy bearings but it's both and there is a decent amount of force going through these to knead the dough.

Or does the LG transfer the force differently?

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Ask lidl to source you a replacement.

The belt broke on my last one and we've not got a £180 panasonic one bought from a local auction house for hellavua lot less than that. It's got a ding in the front but works fine.

We might have been able to get a new belt but the lid was a bit crap at shutting on it so felt it was time to ditch it.

The first one I had was an ultra cheap one from one of the supermarkets. Nothing wrong with that.

Year and a half on? Moot point as I've not kept the receipt but if this sort of timespan is ok for a change owing to wear and tear (which it is, rather than a fault) then I certainly will keep it next time.

It was only £40 IIRC.

If there is no differently-engineered alternative then I might even treat it as a consumable; a quick calculation of 25p for flour and 10p (though it's less than that) for everything else aganist £1 for equivalent quality loaves gives nearly £100 saving so it's paid for itself at least twice.

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I think that is broadly the way they all work. I've had a Panasonic in regular use for 13 years. I'll check if I can see any wear.

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I think that is broadly the way they all work. I've had a Panasonic in regular use for 13 years. I'll check if I can see any wear.

Cheers. If not then the Panasonic may be using hard steel levers against my soft ones.

I don't think it matters either way to most people as they only use it a couple of times before consiging it to a cupboard but if there is a real difference then I may be following Sarah in getting a cheap second hand decent one.

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They're good if you eat a lot of bread and aren't a fan of cheap sliced loaves and/or don't want to pay high prices for 'taste the difference' ones. Easy to use and clean, but take up a lot of room on the kitchen counter and are ugly to look at. Can also be pretty noisy.

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Do you recommend bread makers? We buy shertty loaves twice per week.

Yes. They take no technical skill beyond weighing the flour. The prevelance of bread flour and yeast in Aldi and Lidl suggests it's fairly common these days.

Upsides:

  • great bread at less than a third of the price of the mass-produced stuff (some of which is nice I'll admit, but pricey as a result)
  • you (mostly) know what's in it, also higher protein levels as well

Downsides:

  • the breadmaker takes up a lot of unit space
  • you have to be very good at cutting it to use it in a toaster (I'm not!)
  • as it doesn't have preservatives it's only good for three to four days before it begins to go stale; I make twice a week and get through so not a problem for me but might be for you
  • more washing up!

Whilst hand-making it is much more satisfying (as winkie will be along to tell us!) and is also how I started it is not something that I would want to do twice a week every week; if that was my only option I'd hand make it once a month and buy it the rest of the time.

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  • you have to be very good at cutting it to use it in a toaster (I'm not!)

With all the money you've saved you could buy a slicer.

http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B0015UU96O/ref=s9_top_hd_bw_g79_i2/279-0755228-2681524?pf_rd_m=A3P5ROKL5A1OLE&pf_rd_s=merchandised-search-2&pf_rd_r=0R7GDA5P2E90TTD7DB2Y&pf_rd_t=101&pf_rd_p=663103147&pf_rd_i=3538298031

(no personal experience, but did actually see someone using one once)

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you have to be very good at cutting it to use it in a toaster (I'm not!)

No offence Frank, but I don't understand this. My wife also cannot cut bread - I rib her about it but she doesn't appreciate me trying to show her the correct method (and so it doesn't get any better!).

Don't buy a machine! Are you good with a handsaw? Use any half decent serrated bread knife and treat it like sawing a piece of wood - i.e not too much downward pressure, but more a consistent back and forth sawing motion letting the teeth do the work, long straight steady strokes that will take you down slowly and evenly. Too many people treat it like cutting vegetables and use too much downward force so the bread gets mashed.

You're welcome :)

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I cut wedge shapes most of the time. I start off well but end up cutting funny slices.
I put it down to not being very tall and having less vertical perspective on the loaf.

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No visible signs of wear on the mating surfaces. If you get a second hand one, I think the non stick coating on the tin is what to be most concerned about.

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I cut wedge shapes most of the time. I start off well but end up cutting funny slices.

I put it down to not being very tall and having less vertical perspective on the loaf.

Well I've heard some excuses in my time Sarah! :P

Mine is my general impatient / distractedness with physical tasks. I can hold concentration for hours on complicated mental things (part of my job is modelling the long-term effect of business decisions) but on physical things it's vanishingly small. Cutting a slice of bread starts off ok (my ex told me about the no downards pressure that LC1 flagged) but before I've got halfway down I'm thinking about whether I need to buy more teabags or whatever and it all goes badly wrong.

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No visible signs of wear on the mating surfaces. If you get a second hand one, I think the non stick coating on the tin is what to be most concerned about.

Cheers for looking ntb. It must just be down to cheaper materials then (it's already worn a hole in the pressure sides) so I'll look out for one of the many many second hand breadmakers of decent make now that I know I'll get the use out of it.

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Frank,

have you had a look on ebay to see if you can get a replacement tin (if that's where the wear is). I got a spare dough hook for mine as the genius design separates the hook into the loaf.

also, those plastic bread slicers are great, but don't put them in the dishwasher like what I did as the plastic form came out in a slightly different shape allowing for very curvy slices.

I've been making my own bread for a couple of years now. The bread is great but after the novelty of spending however long kneading the dough each time rapidly wore off I bought a breadmaker which is great, so easy and the bread's as good if not better because of the standardisation.

However... the dough kneading hooks inside the bread making tin are turned by electric motors outside the tin and the linkage is a round interrupted cylinder into which the two prongs under each kneading hook sit.

After about 150 uses the prongs (softish iron or steel) have begun to wear very badly and I doubt they will last a further six months (I use it twice a week) before one breaks; meaning the machine is useless unless I can source another bread tin with prongs for it.

So are there any breadmaking machines that do not have this design weakness?

Other than this I'm totally happy with the machine (bought from Lidl) and thought that they were all much of muchness; with the weak point being the transfer of rotational force from the motors in the main unit to the kneading hooks within the tin through the base of the tin. It's certainly paid for itself many times over so I might just have to accept buying a new one every 18 months / two years.

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It's not the paddles BB, it's the two wings under each (and below the base of the tin) that transfer the drive to them that are being worn away. If it was just one I'd say dodgy bearings but it's both and there is a decent amount of force going through these to knead the dough.

Or does the LG transfer the force differently?

No it doesn't transfer differently but the lugs underneath look unworn and have lasted the life of the machine - so far. (Having said that, they'll probably give up tomorrow).

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No it doesn't transfer differently but the lugs underneath look unworn and have lasted the life of the machine - so far. (Having said that, they'll probably give up tomorrow).

Thnaks, confirms then that it's my getting what I pay for, it did the job as well as any but won't last for ever. My sights are raised.

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I have made bread by hand for the last two years......my sour dough that is added to most loaves as well as dried yeast is also the same age.......would not go back to buying bread already in many cases frozen and defrosted in stores again.....this I highly recommend adding some to strong white and brown and rye flour, sometimes I add sunflower. sesame or other seeds, herbs and nuts are good also honey, olive oil and eggs, all shapes and sizes plaits , rounds, cobs. and bloomers, no machine. :)

wessex-mill-malt-loaf-bread-flour-256px-

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Has anyone got a good no-knead bread recipe?

I once tried a loaf that someone had made by mixing ingredients in a bowl with a wooden spoon and then (I think) putting straight into a bread tin and into the oven, with no rise beforehand. Does this sound possible? I can't exactly recall how she said it was made, but it was definitely no-knead.

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Has anyone got a good no-knead bread recipe?

I once tried a loaf that someone had made by mixing ingredients in a bowl with a wooden spoon and then (I think) putting straight into a bread tin and into the oven, with no rise beforehand. Does this sound possible? I can't exactly recall how she said it was made, but it was definitely no-knead.

Yes possible, was bicarbonate of soda used instead of yeast? ;)

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