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GinAndPlatonic

I Live In A Terrorist House ! A Childs Topic...

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I feel sorry for the child..fear all around.

Critics of the act (terrorism act) argue it forces teachers to over-react, rather than using their common sense, for fear of breaking the law.

http://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2016/jan/20/i-live-in-a-terrorist-house-police-speak-to-muslim-boy-10-over-spelling-error?utm_source=esp&utm_medium=Email&utm_campaign=GU+Today+main+NEW+H&utm_term=151910&subid=15955249&CMP=EMCNEWEML6619I2

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Yes, I imagine even Muslim people subliminally linking terrorism with being Muslim

it seems to be the current reality.

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I feel sorry for the child..fear all around.

Critics of the act (terrorism act) argue it forces teachers to over-react, rather than using their common sense, for fear of breaking the law.

I doubt the police coming to interview you is such a big deal as they are making out.

What do you think would have been a common sense reaction?

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I doubt the police coming to interview you is such a big deal as they are making out.

What do you think would have been a common sense reaction?

common sense not allowed...the new Act is a tick box **** covering exercise.

It wont catch anyone.

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I doubt the police coming to interview you is such a big deal as they are making out.

What do you think would have been a common sense reaction?

Maybe not to you, but for a ten year old it would probably be.

For the teacher to ask the child about the story/topic and talk about it to see what he actually meant. Too easy really.

One has to have some understanding of children to see how this escalated way further than it had to. Some teachers do not.

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I doubt the police coming to interview you is such a big deal as they are making out.

What do you think would have been a common sense reaction?

C'mon. You're ten years old and get quizzed by the police who then turn up at your home and seize your parents' computers. That's a big deal. It'd be a big deal to *me* if I brought the terror police down on my mum - and I'm big and ugly rather than in junior school.

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C'mon. You're ten years old and get quizzed by the police who then turn up at your home and seize your parents' computers. That's a big deal. It'd be a big deal to *me* if I brought the terror police down on my mum - and I'm big and ugly rather than in junior school.

thusly, we, in an attempt to catch those young radicals, have done the job for them.

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C'mon. You're ten years old and get quizzed by the police who then turn up at your home and seize your parents' computers. That's a big deal. It'd be a big deal to *me* if I brought the terror police down on my mum - and I'm big and ugly rather than in junior school.

Yes, could be terribly traumatic for a child that age.

When my elder was 10 police wanted to interview her after we reported a dodgy neighbour, bloke of 50 odd, who'd been inviting neighbours' kids of similar ages and her in, and telling them what he liked to do to his girlfriend, showing them porn, and walking about in a very short towel that showed his bits.

I was appalled at the thought of her being interviewed - she would have thought SHE had done something wrong. We just wanted to make the police aware of what this disgusting bloke had been up to.

Mr B went to see him and had a job to stop himself from thumping him. Thank goodness he moved away not long afterwards, but we made sure the Old Bill knew where he was.

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C'mon. You're ten years old and get quizzed by the police who then turn up at your home and seize your parents' computers. That's a big deal. It'd be a big deal to *me* if I brought the terror police down on my mum - and I'm big and ugly rather than in junior school.

Absolutely. I've been involved with the police in the last few years (I was making a complaint) and the procedure is unfriendly and unhelpful. Whilst I am a big and ugly enough to push on regardless (if anything the lack of any kind of assistance is an incentive - no, you are going to sit down and talk to me) it would put a lot of people off and I would certainly not want to bring any police down on my mum.

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Yes, could be terribly traumatic for a child that age.

When my elder was 10 police wanted to interview her after we reported a dodgy neighbour, bloke of 50 odd, who'd been inviting neighbours' kids of similar ages and her in, and telling them what he liked to do to his girlfriend, showing them porn, and walking about in a very short towel that showed his bits.

I was appalled at the thought of her being interviewed - she would have thought SHE had done something wrong. We just wanted to make the police aware of what this disgusting bloke had been up to.

Mr B went to see him and had a job to stop himself from thumping him. Thank goodness he moved away not long afterwards, but we made sure the Old Bill knew where he was.

I understand that the OB approach to this is to do absolutely nothing and then turn a blind eye when the neighbours beat him to a pulp, whether he's guilty or not (I'm thinking of the recent Bristol case, yours clearly is guilty of something).

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Ok, I didn't mean to offend everyone with my callous disregard of the sensitivity of the little monsters.

Anyway, my point was, if you were a teacher and you saw that, what would you think? We all know the answer now, but I don't think "oh, terraced" would necessarily have jumped into mind. Just say you were marking a child's essay and it said "my dad is a terrorist", what are you supposed to do? It could easily be true. It could be a slip up by the child or it could be a cry for help. As a teacher, maybe it is best you don't talk to him. You don't necessarily want to do the wrong thing. He might run home and tell his dad, the terrorist, and they'd all flee the country or whatever. Presumably, you think, if there is a police procedure for dealing with ths sort of thing, they will have professionals who should take over?

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A first grade girl handed in the drawing below for a homework assignment.

growup.jpg
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After it was graded and the child brought it home, she returned to school the next day with the following note:

Dear Ms. Davis,

I want to be very clear on my child’s illustration. It is NOT of me on a dance pole on a stage in a strip joint. I work at Home Depot and had commented to my daughter how much money we made in the recent snowstorm. This photo is of me selling a shovel.

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It depends if it went.

I live in a terrorist house. The neighbours on both sides are very noisy listening to eastenders at full blast every night.

or

I live in a terrorist house. My brother has just come back from jihadi camp in Pakistan.

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I understand that the OB approach to this is to do absolutely nothing and then turn a blind eye when the neighbours beat him to a pulp, whether he's guilty or not (I'm thinking of the recent Bristol case, yours clearly is guilty of something).

The OB did actually take a lot of details of the bloke - address and full description, etc. And from a couple of questions they asked we could tell they were wondering whether he'd been involved in other incidents they were aware of.

I don't think he'd actually done anything he could be charged with - the kids had been there more than once in a group and it was 'just' talk and showing them pictures in porn mags. They were all old enough to understand that he was a dirty old git and shouldn't be doing it, and that they shouldn't be there at all, let alone guiltily interested, but of course they were. I know my daughter felt ashamed of having been interested, which was another reason a police interview would have been awful for her, however tactfully it was done.

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I think the govt has realised that children are a previously untapped intelligence resource. Not only are we now seeing teachers having to act as spies but there are mutterings about banning home-school.

Reminds me of a book...

Nearly all children nowadays were horrible. What was worst of all was that by means of such organizations as the Spies they were systematically turned into ungovernable little savages, and yet this produced in them no tendency whatever to rebel against the discipline of the Party. On the contrary, they adored the Party and everything connected with it… All their ferocity was turned outwards, against the enemies of the State, against foreigners, traitors, saboteurs, thought-criminals. It was almost normal for people over thirty to be frightened of their own children.

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it sounds as if it was handled in a reasonably low key way.

A spokeswoman for Lancashire Police said: "This was reported to the police but was dealt with by a joint visit by a Pc from the division and social services, not by anyone from Prevent. [/size]

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