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Fairyland

We've Hit Peak Home Furnishings, Says Ikea Boss

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Mortgage/rent takes most of the disposable income. People don't have spare cash for home improvements.

FTB doer/upper kind of homes are brought by BTLers/builders so IKEA sales have probably seen a dip.

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Landlords don't buy furniture and if they do it is cheap stuff. Tenants do not have any money to buy furniture and no reason to do so (if they are going to be moving every 6 months). The ptb never gave thought to how the butterfly effect starting with expensive, captured housing eventually affects all other parts of the economy.

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Hardly surprising when fewer households are being created, normal working people have less disposable income and think twice before buying, less space to store it.....good furniture lasts for years and is recycled and passed down through families........masses of stuff already in storage and is dripped fed into the market....kitchen and homeware can be picked up used and good to go very cheaply.

So much more can be reused, recycled and repaired......good for money management, good for the environment....waste not want not. ;)

Excess stuff will take time to feed through.....new does not always mean better.

Edited by winkie

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It's amazing how empty houses were in say the 1970s, relative to now.

Don't want to sound like an old hippy, but your possessions can really take over your life.

Personally I try to spend my cash in experiences rather than possessions. Though even I seem to accumulate way too much complete rubbish.

Edited by reddog

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It's amazing how empty houses were in say the 1970s, relative to now.

Don't want to sound like an old hippy, but your possessions can really take over your life.

Personally I try to spend my cash in experiences rather than possessions. Though even I seem to accumulate away too much complete rubbish.

A bit of both, because minimalism is catching on too.

Totally agree with you experiences over stuff...the skips, tips and charity shops are overflowing with crap. And the global economy keeps pumping out the crap but like oil the storage is full.

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I love minimalism so I am not contributing In IKEA profits. 70% of my friends are in the process of being minimalists. Even if I need something I prefer to call a local craftsmen and get it made. I think it directly benefits the person as against corporations where most of the money is gobbled by the fat management layer.

Edited by Fairyland

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I only go to Ikea for the Swedish food. I'm a renter - I own a couple of futons, a cheap sofa, a few chairs, a few white goods - that's it. Never going to buy a property in the UK (leaving the country this year) so will never buy anything but gingerbread biscuits and sausages in Ikea. It would be interesting if they did a survey of the average shopper age in Ikea - I bet it's late 40s plus.

Edited by canbuywontbuy

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Ikea car park in Lakeside was very busy at the weekend. Anyway it used to be exciting going to Ikea. personally their low end stuff ain't great. Had a wardrobe fall to bits ( the piece was preassembled). parents had some really decent desks still going after 10years.

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How long is furniture meant to last? Replace when it can't be repaired. We are going to replace some of our bedroom furniture that's had it, although that's lasted well over a decade and was cheap crap. Going for solid wood this time I think so that should last a good few decades.

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Agree with others - no point getting expensive (and heavy!) furniture if you end up moving every year.

Not sure I'll ever buy a new wardrobe or table now, they are often very cheap used online as people are just happy for someone to remove them. Plus if I end up moving soon again (and it happens to be too small or furnished), I wouldn't feel bad about donating the whole lot to charity (or skip?).

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It's quite clear that they need to take a lesson fromt he car industry and offer credit to anyone at the checkout. That will boost sales!

Although i'm kidding, some small part of me really beleives that within a decade most people will be paying for their daily goods using credit. Perhaps they are with credit cards? Maybe BOE an Cameron should start funding for credit cards and get people borrowing huge amounts on cards at 0% interest rates?

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Recently moved in with Miss Tresbon and my folks happened to be wanting to get rid of the wardrobes they got as a wedding present 45 years ago. They are now doing a splendid job in our spare bedroom and am sure will see their own 50th and beyond. My now redundant sofa, table, bed frame and George Foreman have all been re-homed with 40 somethings still renting and not wanting to spend sod all on furniture and house hold goods if possible. I can only see this becoming more popular and acceptable. I'd rented 20 years and everything I owned was either acquired over time or bought 2nd hand at a pittance. The more people who stop playing the game, the better.

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Mortgage/rent takes most of the disposable income. People don't have spare cash for home improvements.

FTB doer/upper kind of homes are brought by BTLers/builders so IKEA sales have probably seen a dip.

Mortgage repayments are more or less at cyclical lows as % household income

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Mortgage repayments are more or less at cyclical lows as % household income

Does that take into account the amount of interest only mortgages (and therefore zero repayments)?

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Declutter your home, get rid of furniture, add 000s to the value of your home. I'm sure this one is at play in the conscience of Brits today.

http://hoa.org.uk/advice/guides-for-homeowners/i-am-selling/top-tips-how-to-make-your-home-more-saleable-and-valuable/

I think we cherish what is expensive and hate anything cheap.

1970; Cantors three piece suite £300, house £6,000....ratio of suite to house price.......................20:1

2016 British Heart Foundation suite £100, house 240,000 ratio of suite to house price.............2,400:1

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It's quite clear that they need to take a lesson fromt he car industry and offer credit to anyone at the checkout. That will boost sales!

Although i'm kidding, some small part of me really beleives that within a decade most people will be paying for their daily goods using credit. Perhaps they are with credit cards? Maybe BOE an Cameron should start funding for credit cards and get people borrowing huge amounts on cards at 0% interest rates?

Funny you should say that, I had an email from Amazon saying that they would now be offering me credit at checkout for orders over £400.

http://www.techtimes.com/articles/121602/20160106/amazon-uk-offering-installment-plans-with-amazon-pay-monthly-option-at-checkout.htm

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Before Xmas there was a TV ad for some furniture place. They were offering 3 years 0% on a £249 sideboard.

Of you need credit for £249 I'm thinking a new sideboard should be well down the expenditure list.

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