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Ignorance Regarding Goods Returns To Shops

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I've noticed the following a few times, socially and on product reviews.

The common no restrictions return policy from most stores, more or less, is 30 days. Ie if in as new condition, apparently unused, many stores, online or in the high Street, will take a return on a durable goods item that you change your mind over.

This seems to get confused in some people's mind with returns of faulty goods. And they bemoan the one month limit if it goes wrong after say two months.

HOWEVER, UK consumer law says that you have to assume it is a manufacturing fault if it goes wrong within 6 months of purchase. Therefore the practical limit for returning a faulty item is 6 months, completely unconnected to the general returns policy of the store. 6 months is a statutory right. Too many people don't get this. I recently returned a USB cable, for example, which had stopped working after about 3 months. Cited consumer law, got refund.

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I've noticed the following a few times, socially and on product reviews.

The common no restrictions return policy from most stores, more or less, is 30 days. Ie if in as new condition, apparently unused, many stores, online or in the high Street, will take a return on a durable goods item that you change your mind over.

This seems to get confused in some people's mind with returns of faulty goods. And they bemoan the one month limit if it goes wrong after say two months.

HOWEVER, UK consumer law says that you have to assume it is a manufacturing fault if it goes wrong within 6 months of purchase. Therefore the practical limit for returning a faulty item is 6 months, completely unconnected to the general returns policy of the store. 6 months is a statutory right. Too many people don't get this. I recently returned a USB cable, for example, which had stopped working after about 3 months. Cited consumer law, got refund.

If you buy a product in a shop, and its been opened (such as a broken seal) - even though there's nothing wrong with it, you are only due a refund / replacement if it doesn't work, not if you change your mind. Best to shop online, as you have your distance selling rights, whereby you can inspect the product, and send it back if you don't like it...

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If you buy a product in a shop, and its been opened (such as a broken seal) - even though there's nothing wrong with it, you are only due a refund / replacement if it doesn't work, not if you change your mind. Best to shop online, as you have your distance selling rights, whereby you can inspect the product, and send it back if you don't like it...

Open it and break it?

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I've noticed the following a few times, socially and on product reviews.

The common no restrictions return policy from most stores, more or less, is 30 days. Ie if in as new condition, apparently unused, many stores, online or in the high Street, will take a return on a durable goods item that you change your mind over.

This seems to get confused in some people's mind with returns of faulty goods. And they bemoan the one month limit if it goes wrong after say two months.

HOWEVER, UK consumer law says that you have to assume it is a manufacturing fault if it goes wrong within 6 months of purchase. Therefore the practical limit for returning a faulty item is 6 months, completely unconnected to the general returns policy of the store. 6 months is a statutory right. Too many people don't get this. I recently returned a USB cable, for example, which had stopped working after about 3 months. Cited consumer law, got refund.

You have time to return a USB cable.......

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Open it and break it?

Hard one to prove whether it was broken during transit or whether the user broke it, and is just chancing their arm...there can be tell tale signs on how it was broken

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Recently I've returned a faulty Microwave (2 months old), and a faulty Computer monitor. If you have the receipt, and it is a national chain, you shouldn't have any problem with a full refund.

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And with their margin on that Currys are probably quite happy to refund or replace a few too! A USB cable should cost £2 not £20.

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Speed-printer-cable-Expression-Series/dp/B009C9G25W/ref=zg_bs_430473031_24

Quality varies wildly though in USB cables. For a lot of people a 99p free delivery tax dodge one off ebay might be fine. I used to sell one particular style for £7.99 retail , which a lot of people would view as excessive, but rather improbably Google used to buy very large quantities by mail order and they later said it was the only one they could find with acceptably low failure rates.

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If you buy a product in a shop, and its been opened (such as a broken seal) - even though there's nothing wrong with it, you are only due a refund / replacement if it doesn't work, not if you change your mind. Best to shop online, as you have your distance selling rights, whereby you can inspect the product, and send it back if you don't like it...

Depends on their returns policy too.

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You have time to return a USB cable.......

It was a fiver and very little time. Fair point however.

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Quality varies wildly though in USB cables. For a lot of people a 99p free delivery tax dodge one off ebay might be fine. I used to sell one particular style for £7.99 retail , which a lot of people would view as excessive, but rather improbably Google used to buy very large quantities by mail order and they later said it was the only one they could find with acceptably low failure rates.

I guess that's down to whether the odd failure is a minor nuisance that'll only occur occasionally or a problem when it happens, which will be often if you've got an awful lot, so I could see why Google might be prepared to pay more. I wouldn't be surprised though if there are people around who think that it'll somehow be better when it does work, missing the "digital either works completely or not at all" aspect. A few years ago I remember someone posting a review saying how much better some audio sounded using some ludicrously overpriced USB cables, which I assumed must've been a parody but apparently not.

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I guess that's down to whether the odd failure is a minor nuisance that'll only occur occasionally or a problem when it happens, which will be often if you've got an awful lot, so I could see why Google might be prepared to pay more. I wouldn't be surprised though if there are people around who think that it'll somehow be better when it does work, missing the "digital either works completely or not at all" aspect. A few years ago I remember someone posting a review saying how much better some audio sounded using some ludicrously overpriced USB cables, which I assumed must've been a parody but apparently not.

Had an argument with the lad in Currys when I bought a new TV last week.

He took the TV to the till and then went walk about, I knew where he was going, to get a gold plated USB cable. On his return he started asking me what I was going to watching on the TV and I told him to stop right away and just sell me the TV. He kept going on and so I gave him chapter and verse on digital signals and why gold plated cables mean ****** all. Finally convinced him to shut up and then he stated on the guarantee ******** which didn't go down well with me at all. Icing on the cake was the next stage when he said was I buying for business, which I wasn't be he said he would put it through any way and I told him in no uncertain terms to shut the ****** up and sell me the television.

At was at this pint that he realised he had got the wrong TV and I gave him a little speech about how he should be concentrating on doing his actual job properly (selling me a TV) rather than focussing on selling me stuff I told him firmly upfront that I wasn't interested in.

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And with their margin on that Currys are probably quite happy to refund or replace a few too! A USB cable should cost £2 not £20.

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Speed-printer-cable-Expression-Series/dp/B009C9G25W/ref=zg_bs_430473031_24

Oh no, you need gold plated at least, if not solid gold.

I reluctantly switched to Bluetooth but only after the salesman demonstrated that the connection can be as good as using quality wires as long as you use the right dehumidifier/ioniser he recommended to purify the air.

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I guess that's down to whether the odd failure is a minor nuisance that'll only occur occasionally or a problem when it happens, which will be often if you've got an awful lot, so I could see why Google might be prepared to pay more. I wouldn't be surprised though if there are people around who think that it'll somehow be better when it does work, missing the "digital either works completely or not at all" aspect. A few years ago I remember someone posting a review saying how much better some audio sounded using some ludicrously overpriced USB cables, which I assumed must've been a parody but apparently not.

Can be other issues as well though with the cheap ones, although they maybe work fine for printers, is them not working with smartphones and tablets and causing the 'not charging' issue. The problem seems to be the wire being poor quality and causing too much voltage drop across the length.

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Is it Argos that have quite an interesting interpretation of consumer rights?

Think they tell you at the point of purchase that you can't return the goods for any reason, or something equally ludicrous.

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Can be other issues as well though with the cheap ones, although they maybe work fine for printers, is them not working with smartphones and tablets and causing the 'not charging' issue. The problem seems to be the wire being poor quality and causing too much voltage drop across the length.

This

Cheap USB cables often charge phones slowly or not at all. And it's not with a few quid of your time fannying with it when a higher cost cable with better conductors will charge your phone in a hurry over a quick lunch break.

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Is it Argos that have quite an interesting interpretation of consumer rights?

Think they tell you at the point of purchase that you can't return the goods for any reason, or something equally ludicrous.

I've on two occasions resorted to refunds from my credit card company when discounting websites said their t&cs prevented them giving refunds for faulty goods or goods that didn't turn up. Simple consumer laws state it's their responsibility, I went the legal route got refunded and left them as a customer.

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The law specifies 6 months? I assumed the law specified only fit for purpose and any rational interpretation of that (say, in a court) would be at least 6 months if it was something like a washing machine or something.

You can successfully get a manufacturer to fix something after 13months saying something that breaks down after 13 months is clearly not fit for purpose.

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