Jump to content
House Price Crash Forum

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

longtomsilver

Thinking About Taking Up Kayaking.

Recommended Posts

Not thinking but actually going to take the sport up in a slow paced kind of way. I briefly owned a Stearns Inflatable until I set my garage on fire back in 2009 when I first sold to rent and packed boxes up against a portable heater which switched it on.

Any recommendations on kayaks. I'm looking for a compact, efficient rig for using on canals (I will join the association) and slow moving rivers. The inflatable wasn't great.

Thanks HPCers

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Fair weather kayaker myself; I have a Tootega 9.5ft, which I bought to stop myself agonising for ages and it's been great fun. The downsides are it's heavy and rough-bottomed so slow.

I would recommend the new breed of canoe-type Kayaks which you sit within but have big openings so getting in and out is easy, Dagger is good from direct experience but others may be as well.

They ride faster and you're much warmer.

Not as good if:

You want to fish - no surfaces to put stuff

You're out on the ocean - a lot less stable

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not thinking but actually going to take the sport up in a slow paced kind of way. I briefly owned a Stearns Inflatable until I set my garage on fire back in 2009 when I first sold to rent and packed boxes up against a portable heater which switched it on.

Any recommendations on kayaks. I'm looking for a compact, efficient rig for using on canals (I will join the association) and slow moving rivers. The inflatable wasn't great.

It sounds like what you really want is a nice open canoe.

But that is in direct conflict with your "compact" criteria.

Generally it just comes down to hull length.. a play boat is short/compact and great fun in waves and rivers, but will be slow and rubbish for mooching around on canals.

Try googling sea kayak and see if that is the sort of thing you are after?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for the links and keep them coming. Faking my own death ha! I only have a small life assurance policy that won't get me far, Rhyl maybe but certainly not Rio De Janeiro.

I'll use the advice here to make my decision and let you all know what I decide in about a week after the kids have gone back to school.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Always check the weight of the kayak before you buy whatever you buy. Especially if it's going on a roof rack. 22K seems OK for a fit single handler - anyone else think differently on this?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Funnily enough a lot of people have been getting their kayaks out around these parts of late.

I know of two lads for instance who kayaked to their mum's for Sunday dinner down the road in a village not far from me.

Was Sunday Dinner, yet again fish?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I took up surf skiing a few years back. Two things that might be relevant:

1. It kills your stomach and lower back muscles when you begin.

2. I bought a moderately expensive surf ski - big mistake. Thing landed on my head and almost killed me when I over turned in the waves. I staggered out of the water and am grateful to this day that I was wearing a helmet. I should have paid twice as much and got one of the ultra light ones.

Hope this helps.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I took up surf skiing a few years back. Two things that might be relevant:

1. It kills your stomach and lower back muscles when you begin.

2. I bought a moderately expensive surf ski - big mistake. Thing landed on my head and almost killed me when I over turned in the waves. I staggered out of the water and am grateful to this day that I was wearing a helmet. I should have paid twice as much and got one of the ultra light ones.

Hope this helps.

No seat belt or thigh straps? bad move on any wave ski,, ahh surf ski forget the first bit then

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have an inflatable canoe (as opposed to a kayak) that I bought as a backup tender on my boat. As it's so handy, it's become the default tender - and great for exploring creeks and rivers.

I used to lust after fancy sea kayaks but I'm too old for that sort of thing now. Used to do it semi-seriously in my youth and could do all the rolls and self-rescue stuff - but you need to be pretty fit (and young) really.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Interesting idea. Since I now live right next to a canal perhaps it's something to think about (and means I don't need the roof rack, although fitting in the shed might be a problem). An open canoe sounds a bit more appealing to me. Do they come with some sort of rudder so you don't need to keep switching which side you paddle on?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I started kayaking (pool practice) and loved it. But it was a winter sport and I never went onto a river due to fear of capsizing.

Unless it's a powerful river I don't see a problem. I've fallen off mine several times (usually when getting on in deep water off a high bank), other than the cold the only problem is scrambling back on. As long as you have your paddle leashed to the kayak then even if you can't do this because you're cold and tired you can still hold on and kick yourself to the shallows.

If it's a fast-flowing river then you need a lot more care - I've twice had problems, both in water little more than knee deep - but slow rivers are fine.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Interesting idea. Since I now live right next to a canal perhaps it's something to think about (and means I don't need the roof rack, although fitting in the shed might be a problem). An open canoe sounds a bit more appealing to me. Do they come with some sort of rudder so you don't need to keep switching which side you paddle on?

Eh? Pretty much everybody has a double-ended paddle.

I would always prefer a solid kayak to an inflatable if you can store it / carry it. I've used a £60 inflatable and a much better £350 inflatable, the real downsides are:

High sides - you get blown a lot by the wind and it's harder to paddle as you're reaching over. With the cheap one as it went soft the side cushion was pretty much in my armpit.

Drying after washing - harder to do and more essential because of smells.

Upsides:

Weight - they are lighter although, in the case of quality inflatables with tough exterior skin and separate inner (replaceable) bladders, not much.

Storage and portability - big upsides.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • Next General Election   90 members have voted

    1. 1. When do you predict the next general election will be held?


      • 2019
      • 2020
      • 2021
      • 2022

    Please sign in or register to vote in this poll. View topic


×

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.