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Schools In Crisis As Graduates Turn Their Backs On Teaching - Can't Afford Housing....

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http://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2015/dec/26/teacher-shortage-graduates

Britain’s leading expert on school recruitment has warned that a shortage of trainee teachers is reaching crisis levels in some of the most important subjects in the curriculum.

In evidence submitted to the parliamentary education select committee, TeachVac, an independent vacancy-matching and monitoring service for education professionals, said that it had identified a “woeful” lack of new teachers in several key secondary school subjects.

Its founder, Professor John Howson, who has conducted research into the labour market for teachers since the early 1980s, said that 2015 would go down as the year when a new teacher supply crisis started. He predicted that the shortage of trainees would worsen as pupil numbers rose and cash-strapped graduates, unable to afford homes, turned their backs on teaching.

The secondary school population fell throughout the last parliament because of a declining birth rate but is now predicted to rise. The School Teachers Review Body claims that it will be 17% higher in 2023 than it was last year.

“By the beginning of the 2020s we will have more children in secondary schools than we’ve ever had in the history of education,” Howson said.

Still I'm sure higher prices will help..... Perhaps teachers should all club together and live in a commune?

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How will they read the Internet

Muppet

You only need to say "OK Google" to get started on the internet. My 2 year old can already do it. And I'll be amazed if he's not reading before he starts school.

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Reading, writing and arithmetic the most important basic subjects to learn at school.......still some kids from some schools leave without knowing the basics, knowing enough to see them through in life to earn their keep......why is that?.....

Very many subjects are available to learn and find out about from new technologies, often for free......that can only be a good thing for everyone........the cost of putting a basic home over your families head and paying for it, together with paying living costs is absurd, not only for certain teachers but for very many people in society today who wish to live in certain places.....the other option is to borrow it and spread the cost over a longer working life and live on less. ;)

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In China teachers get their own apartments in a teachers dorm so don't have to pay any rent, if it's a university students get accommodation in the student's dorm and pay something like 100-200 pounds per year but have to their rooms with other students. Teacher's get accommodation in all forms of schools from primary all the way to university.

If we had a system like this it would create a lot of demand for teaching jobs, allow good teachers to work in expensive areas and allow high quality labour to get into teaching without having to pay higher salaries.

But it will never happen because the government wouldn't do anything to undermine property prices.

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The article is ********.

Teaching is still massively oversubscribed going by the experience of teachers I know.

Being involved in recruitment in that area, I can tell you that there is a massive shortage of maths and physical science teachers. The article actually says that it is subject dependent which seems to be quite accurate from my experience.

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i wouldn't be surprised at huge turn-over in staff in various jobs until it reaches a point of crisis, skills shortages.

Whats the point when wages compared to living costs (house prices) are such a joke?

Whole generations were kept happy working as they were getting thousands gifted in unearnt equity, but whats going to happen moving forwards when your wages cant buy you any decent quality of life?

bit of a slow motion break down in services both private and public. why bother doing anything hard if your whole life will just be work? no retirement, renting forever. might as well do a job you enjoy whatever that is, arty stuff, music etc.

im not going to teach bratty children or wipe boomers arses. seems too much like hard work.

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Being involved in recruitment in that area, I can tell you that there is a massive shortage of maths and physical science teachers. The article actually says that it is subject dependent which seems to be quite accurate from my experience.

Interesting, as a physical science graduate who has periodically toyed with the idea of teaching, your view is consistent with what I am often told.

It has gone beyond money for me though, the workload is utterly immense by all accounts and frankly I doubt I'd be up to the task. Maybe one day but not now.

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I used to work with a former maths teacher, who got sick of teaching and went into IT (this was about 5 years ago).

He reckoned, when he went for a job interview for a maths teaching job there were only 1 or 2 other people who had applied so he new he had a pretty good shot.

However for PE and English there could be 60 or 70 who applied, so no skills shortage there.

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He reckoned, when he went for a job interview for a maths teaching job there were only 1 or 2 other people who had applied so he new he had a pretty good shot.

This is still true, probably more so than 5 years ago as the jobless numbers have gone down. There is also an awful retention rate for maths and physics teachers which is reflected by your friend's story.

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The article is ********.

Teaching is still massively oversubscribed going by the experience of teachers I know.

Get some XPS on that anecdote.

Your judgement presupposes a homogeneity of the sampled material. It may turn out that it has some structure. This just in from the lab - history graduates struggling to demonstrate the mathematical connection between the gradient of the scalar potential and the associated vector field, (back on the A level specification again, as well as how it presents in the electrostatic and gravitational cases.)

9148130.jpg

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I used to work with a former maths teacher, who got sick of teaching and went into IT (this was about 5 years ago).

He reckoned, when he went for a job interview for a maths teaching job there were only 1 or 2 other people who had applied so he new he had a pretty good shot.

However for PE and English there could be 60 or 70 who applied, so no skills shortage there.

Are they still not paying teachers of different subjects different salaries? It sounds like they need to put the salaries up for maths teachers. You could fund it by cutting the salaries of PE and English teachers :)

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Are they still not paying teachers of different subjects different salaries? It sounds like they need to put the salaries up for maths teachers. You could fund it by cutting the salaries of PE and English teachers :)

When I was in school, a trainee PE teacher, taking his first lesson, tore off the necklace of a pal - straight from his neck with a big pull - infront of the whole class.

I get the same impulse when I see those smiling guys wearing the ARLA/Landlord ribbon medals.

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Interesting, as a physical science graduate who has periodically toyed with the idea of teaching, your view is consistent with what I am often told.

It has gone beyond money for me though, the workload is utterly immense by all accounts and frankly I doubt I'd be up to the task. Maybe one day but not now.

I imagine you would be good at it. You're super intelligent (imo) - and especially compared to me.

In a HPC science quiz, I would back you to win.

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Teachers working in the halcyon Brown years minted it with real income and brilliant pension deals.

New entrants have to pay for this. Simples.

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Teachers working in the halcyon Brown years minted it with real income and brilliant pension deals.

New entrants have to pay for this. Simples.

I wish it was so simples. Teachers pay, and more importantly working conditions, have been on a downward slope for years. I am delighted to see Schools struggling to get staff; it might see a resetting of pay and conditions for teachers. I see it as being similar to a HPC, inevitable if the fundamentals don't change.

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I wish it was so simples. Teachers pay, and more importantly working conditions, have been on a downward slope for years. I am delighted to see Schools struggling to get staff; it might see a resetting of pay and conditions for teachers. I see it as being similar to a HPC, inevitable if the fundamentals don't change.

Academies, free schools, and FE colleges aren't constrained to national payscales are they? (Genuine question)

They can surely pay extra for the right staff? Or would the unions not permit this?

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The constant downward march of value in wages will eventually stop and reverse. We have a poorly system to tied up in house values.

I fear that we will start to see seriously stress and failures in schools, hospitals etc, until we finally go after the unearned equity. boomers will quickly overwhelm the NHS and pensions systems they never paid enough in for. they will soon have to pay themselves as future generations currently left will nothing can't shoulder the load.

free markets can be beautiful. just a hell of a shame in the change periods like now, when many get poor educations or poor late treatments.

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odd how an ever increasing population cant pay for its own basic needs.

In theory, everything should be just as easy with a 20million population as a 120 million population, each one producing according to its needs.

Or is public sector a leech on society, taking more every year and providing less? Is this due to a local command economy in the public sector, producing too many PE and English teachers and not enough science and maths?

And when people do get into these jobs, they are bullied by a system that shows how efficient it is by trying to eek every working minute of a workers time with a task made up to keep the statisticians busy?

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Teachers working in the halcyon Brown years minted it with real income and brilliant pension deals.

New entrants have to pay for this. Simples.

There's a lot more to this than people might pick up.

The one-eyed cretin splurged out huge sums on current spending - bumping up wages, putting 2 TAs in each class, doubling the admin for schools. That splurge also push up future pension liabilities.

Each time someone in the public sector goes on about 'How good' Brown was, I point out he's fscked hem over in his quest to get people to vote for him.

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I wish it was so simples. Teachers pay, and more importantly working conditions, have been on a downward slope for years. I am delighted to see Schools struggling to get staff; it might see a resetting of pay and conditions for teachers. I see it as being similar to a HPC, inevitable if the fundamentals don't change.

Balls. Pay and condition vastly improved.

The thing teachers gripe about is being assessed more. Tough. Teacher assessment is no where near the level of assesment in the private sector. And there's still nothing like the level of hire and fire.

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