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On the other hand - years ago I pulled a burd in Edinburgh who took me back to her caravan. Never even realised they existed around here. Was somewhere on south side of town towards bilston area i think.

Saw it recently when driving past and realised I had been before.

You're talking about the woman here, aren't you?

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I think a trailer, a good quality trailer, would be a great solution for me.

I depend too much on contracting jobs, which although they pay well, they have little security. In effect I have to move around evry one or two years. The rent's and agent fees are taking a 1/3 or more of my income and I really want to save.

What I was wandering is, is it legal to live in a motor home all year round?

If so it would pay itself off in a year, and when I eventually save up enough, the motor home would still have some residual value.

A canal boat?

The canal network goes pretty much everywhere.

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^^^ £110k?! I thought they were supposed to be cheap.

and most likely they don't even own the land it sits on.

Click "Market Info" -

Why should it be more than the £25,000 for that one 1 mile away - and even that one seems a bit pricey.

Notice the one on stilts on sloping ground £44,500 :lol:

Edited by billybong
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Portugese family of 6 found living in a lock up garage in Leicester paying £400 a month rent!

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-leicestershire-35158840

I wouldn't mind one of those large metal American style trailers to live in i'd be quite happy, probably have to make sure it was pretty secure though.

This sort of thing makes my blood boil for the reason that......

the statement implicitly affirming that the garage can be used again for similar habitation, once 'extensive work' is done by the landlord (i.e living in garage is now deemed socially acceptable by TPTB), and

that those in authority responsible for the state of housing in the nation (i.e our MPs) continue to remain de facto ambivalent to these constantly appearing reports and unable or unwilling to see just whats actually going on!

I don't know which of them I'd happily prefer to see 'put up against the wall' first if revolution came.

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The trailer park near me (Billing Aquadrome) gets flooded at least once a year, and the trailer dwellers have spent nights in a local sports club hall sleeping mattress-to-mattress. This is progress?

Flooded Again - Time To Build Thousands Of Floating Houses

http://www.housepricecrash.co.uk/forum/index.php?/topic/207551-flooded-again-time-to-build-thousands-of-floating-houses/

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I'd rather live in trailer park than share a house. However, looking at a few mobile homes in South East area, shows that they are almost as expensive as real houses, so there is just no point.

Thanks, BTL for over-priced rents. Thanks NIMBY's, for useless green fields. Would be nice they all camped in fields and I lived in their house.

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Another day and another headline relating to housing unaffordability

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-35154420

Seeing this piece coincides with a chat with an anglo-american friend who wagers that the UK is getting perilously close to reluctantly allowing the introduction of U.S style trailer home living as the authorities, unable to bring themselves to actually legitimately lower the cost of housing (i.e. via free market forces and not via gimmicks such as HTB, etc).

I guess the closest we have to U.s style trailer parks are 'park' homes (often with residency restrictions). It is quite sobering to mentally image trailer homes sprouting up en masse in the UK.

Anyone want to bet against it happening?

Jaywick in Essex anyone?

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I think I posted this earlier in the year on hpc .

I recall reading that one firm owned 75% of trailer parks, & it was now virtually impossible to get planning for one

America's trailer parks: the residents may be poor but the owners are getting rich...

http://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2015/may/03/owning-trailer-parks-mobile-home-university-investment

It’s an unusual but potentially lucrative investment: billionaire Warren Buffett is heavily invested, and his and others’ success is prompting ordinary people to attend Mobile Home University, a ‘boot camp’ in trailer park ownership.......According to US Census figures, more than 20 million people, or 6% of the population, live in trailer parks.

It is a market that has not been lost on some of the country’s richest and most high-profile investors. Sam Zell’s Equity LifeStyle Properties (ELS) is the largest mobile home park owner in America, with controlling interests in nearly 140,000 parks. In 2014, ELS made $777m in revenue, helping boost Zell’s near-$5bn fortune.

Warren Buffett, the nation’s second-richest man with a $72bn fortune, owns the biggest mobile home manufacturer in the US, Clayton Homes, and the two biggest mobile home lenders, 21st Mortgage Corporation and Vanderbilt Mortgage and Finance Company. Buffett’s trailer park investments will feature heavily at his annual meeting this weekend, which will be attended by more than 40,000 shareholders in Omaha.

Such success is prompting ordinary people with little or no experience to try to follow in their footsteps.

Edited by Saving For a Space Ship
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To tell the truth I have thought about living in a "Trailer" considering I have the money to buy one outright which would allow me to start building up some serious savings. The trouble is we live in a very snobby society when it comes to housing and I'm not sure how people would take it. One scenario that keeps running in my mind is trying to pull a bird. I mean how would they react if i took them back to what is basically a caravan? I imagine people may start to label me a "Gypo" and such too. You may think that people may not be as shunning and mocking as I may think, but you'd be surprised how people react when you fall outside of the norm. One example that was a lesson to me is back in my early 20's I decided to get a wild hairstyle, just a spur of the moment "f*ck it" type of thing. I got Liberty Spikes and died them bright red. I lost half of my friends over night and would get abuse from random strangers out in public, everything from sly comments to people actually squaring up wanting a fight. It was a real eye opener as to how people really are.

You're not on your own there. It's social policing that keeps us all doing what we're told and getting fleeced.

Twenty years ago I dragged a rotten 70s mobile home into a field and lived in it illegally for fifteen years. I added rooms, insulated it, stuck a proper roof on, even fitted underfloor heating. I let my wife have it in the divorce on an acre of land. Because it's been there so long it is exempt from enforcement. It was valued at 125k for the divorce!

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Couple of points. Someone mentioned boats are cold - nonsense. Stoves are usually 5kw at least which is way more than you need on a boat. I'm on one, and it's lovely and warm, as long as you don't mind the odd chilly morning when you have to get up and stoke the fire. No more so than a caravan that's for sure, providing its insulated, the floor of course is important but thick underlay and a woollen carpet is cheap when it's only a few square metres. Somebody else asked about the legality of living in a van. You can perfectly legally live in whatever abode you choose, whether it be a van, a mobile home, a boat or even a shed. It's the land it's on that dictates whether you are allowed to live there or not, rather than the abode. Boats are easy, either you are moving on all the time (continuously cruising, like a permanent holiday), or you have a permanent but not residential mooring where you can live for 11 months of the year (so you cruise for a month so as not to breach the rules, but nobody checks), or you have a residential mooring, which are rare. Marinas often let you live onboard full time, a blind eye is turned all over the place as long as you pay your way. Vans are a bit different because there isn't the equivalent of a permanent mooring for vans, but still plenty of caravan parks will let you stay there permanently as long as you pay the bills. The only issue is the question of where your official residence is. Unless you are living on land that has residential planning permission, then you are effectively homeless from a legal perspective, which leads me to my next point: if you plan to take out a mortgage at some point in the future, you will generally need to have lived, beyond reasonable doubt, at an officially recognised (that means with a royal mail postcode) address for 3 years. So if you do this, then having somewhere you can claim to have lived officially is most beneficial. Live in a van or a boat, but spend a little while living at your parents or wherever during the year. And receive bills there, otherwise when you want to move out and buy a house, you'll find few lenders will give you a mortgage, because you'll have been homeless.

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Couple of points. Someone mentioned boats are cold - nonsense. Stoves are usually 5kw at least which is way more than you need on a boat. I'm on one, and it's lovely and warm, as long as you don't mind the odd chilly morning when you have to get up and stoke the fire. No more so than a caravan that's for sure, providing its insulated, the floor of course is important but thick underlay and a woollen carpet is cheap when it's only a few square metres. Somebody else asked about the legality of living in a van. You can perfectly legally live in whatever abode you choose, whether it be a van, a mobile home, a boat or even a shed. It's the land it's on that dictates whether you are allowed to live there or not, rather than the abode. Boats are easy, either you are moving on all the time (continuously cruising, like a permanent holiday), or you have a permanent but not residential mooring where you can live for 11 months of the year (so you cruise for a month so as not to breach the rules, but nobody checks), or you have a residential mooring, which are rare. Marinas often let you live onboard full time, a blind eye is turned all over the place as long as you pay your way. Vans are a bit different because there isn't the equivalent of a permanent mooring for vans, but still plenty of caravan parks will let you stay there permanently as long as you pay the bills. The only issue is the question of where your official residence is. Unless you are living on land that has residential planning permission, then you are effectively homeless from a legal perspective, which leads me to my next point: if you plan to take out a mortgage at some point in the future, you will generally need to have lived, beyond reasonable doubt, at an officially recognised (that means with a royal mail postcode) address for 3 years. So if you do this, then having somewhere you can claim to have lived officially is most beneficial. Live in a van or a boat, but spend a little while living at your parents or wherever during the year. And receive bills there, otherwise when you want to move out and buy a house, you'll find few lenders will give you a mortgage, because you'll have been homeless.

That's fine ^

But have you ever banged a burd in a caravan ?

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This sort of thing makes my blood boil for the reason that......

the statement implicitly affirming that the garage can be used again for similar habitation, once 'extensive work' is done by the landlord (i.e living in garage is now deemed socially acceptable by TPTB), and

that those in authority responsible for the state of housing in the nation (i.e our MPs) continue to remain de facto ambivalent to these constantly appearing reports and unable or unwilling to see just whats actually going on!

I don't know which of them I'd happily prefer to see 'put up against the wall' first if revolution came.

I also see they were rehoused by the council.

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The caravan act of the late sixties is worth a look at, with some amendments it's pretty much the same. Ok for the times.

Now, the parks are slowly being purchased by well financed companies and the high ground rent, rules and the replacement of old caravans are all very much a reality for all year round parks.

The concept of a mobile home is sound, from about 2005 the main manufacturers started to improve design with insulation, c/h, d/g etc.

The trouble is, the concept of renting a pitch, putting a 5k ten year old van on and then living well is just not possible legally or practically. So, you have to think outside the box. Break the rules?, if all fails, you still have an asset worth almost as much so the capital loss is minimal.

Not easy, but doable if you have some contacts or are prepared to do the groundwork of speaking to farmers, landowners, friends with big gardens etc.

The trouble is getting planning for any NEW parks, even though we have loads of space for them. I would also suggest looking at the concept of buying a few acres of agricultural land and with like minded people or just on your own just do it. It is NOT illegal to put one anywhere as long as it's not a dwelling, so make sure it is technically not a dwelling.

The law is largely still in place to prevent the traveling community setting up new sites, but lets be honest, they have to live somewhere too.

My view is that a big trailer park, if built now with relaxed rules would end up being a slum, but with the possibility of going off grid, a little one at the back of a field, well shielded, would not be beyond the realms of possibility.

You can still pull birds, trust me.

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I think if I had to live and work in this country long term the only viable options would be living at home with parents on under market rent or sleeping in my own car and using facilities at a 24 hour gym, as these are getting more popular these days. It's the only way you can save serious money on an income of 20-30k. Don't even talk about incomes of 12-18k, that's on the poverty line!

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I think if I had to live and work in this country long term the only viable options would be living at home with parents on under market rent or sleeping in my own car and using facilities at a 24 hour gym, as these are getting more popular these days. It's the only way you can save serious money on an income of 20-30k. Don't even talk about incomes of 12-18k, that's on the poverty line!

Over the summer months this may be possible if you had a small camper van. winter could get a bit cold and depressing.

Often Gyms have wifi so some free entertainment there. Certainly would get fit and save lots!

i jacked in my good secure job and moved to a relatively remote area to live with parents, i worked out i was better off living at home and taking any old job that came around than slogging my guts out for rent. bit sad that i had to make the choice as i work in a productive wealth creating industry!

I was lucky that after 2-3 months i found a good job only an hours drive away in my field and a raise.

its really sad that rent can be a trap if you are earning average wages, renting a studio flat for 2 years seriously ate into my savings, i did try a room-share but after 7 months found the constant music and filth to be a bit much. if you find a good house share that can be the cheapest option especially with bills included.

waiting for a HPC is sensible, but in the mean-time need to save as much as possible by any means to buy a house when they bottom.

I did have a friend who lived in a caravan for years with no electric on his employers land, but again keeping spirits high can be hard in that situation.

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  • 3 weeks later...

The caravan act of the late sixties is worth a look at, with some amendments it's pretty much the same. Ok for the times.

Now, the parks are slowly being purchased by well financed companies and the high ground rent, rules and the replacement of old caravans are all very much a reality for all year round parks.

The concept of a mobile home is sound, from about 2005 the main manufacturers started to improve design with insulation, c/h, d/g etc.

The trouble is, the concept of renting a pitch, putting a 5k ten year old van on and then living well is just not possible legally or practically. So, you have to think outside the box. Break the rules?, if all fails, you still have an asset worth almost as much so the capital loss is minimal.

Not easy, but doable if you have some contacts or are prepared to do the groundwork of speaking to farmers, landowners, friends with big gardens etc.

The trouble is getting planning for any NEW parks, even though we have loads of space for them. I would also suggest looking at the concept of buying a few acres of agricultural land and with like minded people or just on your own just do it. It is NOT illegal to put one anywhere as long as it's not a dwelling, so make sure it is technically not a dwelling.

The law is largely still in place to prevent the traveling community setting up new sites, but lets be honest, they have to live somewhere too.

My view is that a big trailer park, if built now with relaxed rules would end up being a slum, but with the possibility of going off grid, a little one at the back of a field, well shielded, would not be beyond the realms of possibility.

You can still pull birds, trust me.

Very informative. Thank you.

I have some other questions about living in a motorhome/caravan. Washing clothes, waste disposal etc. How can I set myselgf up AND go to work everyday without being noticed by some NIMBY or the council?

I'm guessing those who are considering packing work in and/or living in a caravan must be living in London/south of England?

Nope. Midlands at the moment, I have to move wherever there is work. I've been all over the place.

Over the summer months this may be possible if you had a small camper van. winter could get a bit cold and depressing.

Often Gyms have wifi so some free entertainment there. Certainly would get fit and save lots!

i jacked in my good secure job and moved to a relatively remote area to live with parents, i worked out i was better off living at home and taking any old job that came around than slogging my guts out for rent. bit sad that i had to make the choice as i work in a productive wealth creating industry!

I was lucky that after 2-3 months i found a good job only an hours drive away in my field and a raise.

its really sad that rent can be a trap if you are earning average wages, renting a studio flat for 2 years seriously ate into my savings, i did try a room-share but after 7 months found the constant music and filth to be a bit much. if you find a good house share that can be the cheapest option especially with bills included.

waiting for a HPC is sensible, but in the mean-time need to save as much as possible by any means to buy a house when they bottom.

I did have a friend who lived in a caravan for years with no electric on his employers land, but again keeping spirits high can be hard in that situation.

That's really sad that your life and career got put on hold, and that wealth and economic progress got swallowed up by a housing ponzi. This is insane! How could politicians not see the danger?

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  • 442 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
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      • up 5%



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