Jump to content
House Price Crash Forum

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

200p

Quality Street (Others Also) Are Shrinking

Recommended Posts

article-0-0DB6FD3C00000578-517_468x466.j

This is from 2011 http://www.thisismoney.co.uk/money/markets/article-2033726/Cadbury-cuts-roses-save-cost-risking-wrath-customers.html

And in 2015, they dropped the tins, and gone for smaller plastic containers (above post). that are 729g - source http://www.tesco.com/groceries/product/details/?id=259238725

1Kg - probably before 2000. A comment says they used to be a hefty 1.8Kg one time.

975g pre 2011

850g post 2011. A 12.8% reduction on pre-2011

729g 2015 A 14.2% reduction on post-2011. The size reductions are accelerating!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's a con......just proves the point that buying any brand name stands for little or nothing.

The tins have turned into plastic, the size has shrunk, more air in smaller plastic tubs, smaller sweets in smaller plastic thinner tubs, different cheaper ingredients in smaller sweets with more air in smaller plastic lighter tubs.

Edit to say.....even if the quality stays the same all be it smaller it is another way of giving you less for more or less for no more......who would pay ~£20 for a tin of sweets? Who could pay £20 to £30 for a ton of old style treats?

Another well known food item I always purchased 250g in box, always had 250g in box....until one day same box, same picture, same size had 200g on box, same price...stealth inflation.....I called the customers services to ask why and they said their customers preferred the new size!!!!.....well if all else fails they could pull out the health sales patter....smaller is healthier, and better......we care about our customers well being.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As I said on the main forum these can be had for three quid at Tesco, I bet they were at least a fiver in 1998 may be more. Pro rata, inflation adjusted, they have got cheaper and have become a bit of a loss leader. Deflation bring it on.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As I said on the main forum these can be had for three quid at Tesco, I bet they were at least a fiver in 1998 may be more. Pro rata, inflation adjusted, they have got cheaper and have become a bit of a loss leader. Deflation bring it on.

Was going to say exactly the same, they used to be getting on for £8, it was a toss up between Roses and Quality Street. You now have a mass of other options and I'd imagine both companies have decided it's a volume game now, cut the size and drastically cut the price.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's the change from a metal to plastic "tin" that really smacks of cost-cutting to me.

Saw something the other day showing many chocolate bars had rather a size spurt in the 1990s / 2000s and have just shrunk back now, some a bit smaller than in the 80s, some a bit larger.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

cut the size and drastically cut the price.

AND cut the quality. Ingredients have been substituted, some have been removed and the overall quality is dropping like a stone.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What irritates me is not the reduction in size, but the change in formula. The new chocolate is nasty. That goes for a lot of stuff these days.

If you want some old school milk chocolate best to got for Milka - irony being of course that these are made by the same business.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

But obviously, as we all know, inflation is at record lows so there's really nothing to worry about.

The pound today buys a hell a lot more Quality Street gold toffee pennies than it ever did in 1998 once you adjust for CPI. It does buy less gold though. Of course since 2011 it buys twice as much gold and twice as many gold pennies with Tesco selling the tins for three quid.....deflation bring it on.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest eight

The pound today buys a hell a lot more Quality Street gold toffee pennies than it ever did in 1998 once you adjust for CPI. It does buy less gold though. Of course since 2011 it buys twice as much gold and twice as many gold pennies with Tesco selling the tins for three quid.....deflation bring it on.

I think you're right. Twenty years ago I would have considered a tin of Quality Street to be a massive discretionary purchase, and strictly Christmas only. Now, just chuck it in the trolley - if I actually wanted one, that is. Which I don't.

IIRC mail order catalogues used to sell them on 20 or 40 week terms.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

More annoying is that both brands have mucked about with their selections over the years. It seemed that every year another of my favourite centres would be dropped. I don't bother with them now.

Nearly every Quality street tin I have ever seen ends up with brown and gold rappers left at the bottom...that's the coffee cream and toffee pennies then. Somehow those purple and green ones have always gone before the tin is half empty. Once did know someone that did it in reverse, but they are rare indeed.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

AND cut the quality. Ingredients have been substituted, some have been removed and the overall quality is dropping like a stone.

Well yeah, wasn't suggesting that it was an altruistic move on their part, just not as simple as many of the other reduced sized stuff that's been going on.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've dug around on the old interweb and it seems these biggest tins (3 or 4 lbs I imagine) cost around £9 back in the 1980s. If that is true then they'd cost over £20 today (this excludes any commodity specific inflation). £5 - 1/4 of the size for 1/4 of the price...

Funnily enough I almost feel sorry for the chocolate companies :o the great british pubelick seem to want prices to remain the same despite inflation (maybe they should start selling chocolate houses) and for the size of the chocolate to stay the same.

If Nestle (and Cadbury) had half a brain they'd find the RRP of those tins and then publish the cost once inflation is factored in.

Actually this shows just how poor their understanding of things like inflation, IRs and commodity prices are. This is an oldish graph but cocoa has basically doubled in price over the past 10 years. Not a massive increase per chocolate maybe, but an increase all the same.

hcp.jpg

You can almost hear the sheeple now "house price inflation gooood, cocoa price inflation baaad" ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A few years back, the UN estimated that about 5-10% of world cocoa was produced by slave labour. There have been attempts to eliminate this (Fair trade, etc.) which I would assume would put up the cocoa price.

Perhaps people are nostalgic for old, slave-produced chocolate.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • The Prime Minister stated that there were three Brexit options available to the UK:   103 members have voted

    1. 1. Which of the Prime Minister's options would you choose?


      • Leave with the negotiated deal
      • Remain
      • Leave with no deal

    Please sign in or register to vote in this poll. View topic


×

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.