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Does a tree drink the same amount in winter as in summer?

Tree roots help water get into the ground, because they offer a way down to the subsoil.

This is probably more useful than them 'drinking up the water'

The trees canopy (even without leaves) slow the travel of water into the ground. Trees reduce run off by making the ground far less smooth. Also a layer of leaf litter acts as a good sponge

Edited by Kurt Barlow
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Quite, so well they will suck up water during the summer, they won't during the winter. Which is now.

They make make the way for water to enter the ground easier though.

They are not the whole solution, and whilst it would be lovely to say 'go plant trees' you don't want to know how much it costs our council to plant a tree. It's about £400.

Planting a semi mature tree in a street is different from mass planting.

If you are going to plant 1000's acres of short rotation coppice using willow, alder, birch or poplar the cost is 1-2 pounds per tree.

In most cases cuttings are used and just poked into the ground where they self root.

Edited by Kurt Barlow
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Quite, so well they will suck up water during the summer, they won't during the winter. Which is now.

They make make the way for water to enter the ground easier though.

They are not the whole solution, and whilst it would be lovely to say 'go plant trees' you don't want to know how much it costs our council to plant a tree. It's about £400.

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Edited by Kurt Barlow
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We've known exactly how to build flood resistant houses for hundreds of years - the old Queenslander style on stilts:

295918-flood-designed-queenslander-house

Cheer for that, interesting.

I know a friend who bought a flooded in N.Wales. Not wanting to sound like a vulture, but perhaps given the land prob, its one of a few ways to afford land to self build on.

Presumably, no lender would mortgage it, so it would have to be a cash purchase.

I've been thinking about building a floating work shop on floating pontoons.

It would be using concrete clad IBC's, (to protect against being hit by floating debris , filled with scrap polystyrene, so they are unsinkable.

I work witha community group who make insulated panels, so we would most likely make the building out of metal sandwich Pir rigid foam (like kinspan) .

Lightweight metal clad frame ( see http://www.instructables.com/id/Clad-Composite-Beam-From-Waste/ )

Todays news .....

Final bill for winter flooding will hit £1.3bn, insurers say

http://www.theguardian.com/business/2016/jan/11/flooding-bill-will-hit-13bn-say-insurers

Edit: I talked to my friend in N.Wales, who bought the the flooded house cheap near Rhyl.

He said despite leaving the front & back door s open for 6 months, it still not dry out. He eventually had to sell it , as it effecting his lungs.

Perhaps a passive haus type design would cope with the mosquitoes / damp air by filtering air.

I most likely will try & rent some land , not buy, in case it does not work out

Edited by Saving For a Space Ship
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  • 3 months later...
Who would live in a pod like this? Architect designs tiny flats to stand on stilts above car parks in bid to solve UK housing crisis
article-3545698-334CADA000000578-538_964

Architect Bill Dunster is trying to build the 74 square foot pods (centre) in Oxford. They have solar panels and water recycling systems as well as a compact bedroom (top left) and cosy kitchen area (bottom left). The pods, which cost between £55,000 and £60,000 to install, also come with a bright living room (top tight) and outdoor space (bottom right). Mr Dunster's firm ZEDfactory has approached Oxford City Council about trialling up to 50 of the homes and has offered to meet the costs. Craig Simmons, group leader of Oxford City Council Green Party, claimed the proposal ticked 'all the boxes'. He added: 'This is a well thought-through scheme. It would be foolish for the city council to turn down the offer of a trial.' Mr Dunster is currently in talks with Bath Council and Sutton Council in London to introduce the pods there. Developers say the homes could be let for around £750 per month including bills.

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Floating homes: a solution to flooding, crowded cities and unaffordable housing

Architects from Amsterdam to Lagos are building on water to try to tackle the twin urban pressures of population density and climate change  

https://www.theguardian.com/sustainable-business/2016/oct/29/floating-homes-architecture-build-water-overcrowding-cities-unaffordable-housing?utm_source=twitterfeed&utm_medium=twitter

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Last winter's floods 'most extreme on record in UK', says study (released Dec 2016)

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2016/dec/05/last-winters-floods-most-extreme-on-record-uk-study

 

Bumped due to release of study 

Edited by Saving For a Space Ship
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  • 11 months later...

Swathes of England's vital flood defences ‘almost useless’

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2021/jan/24/england-vital-flood-defences-almost-useless

Quote

Thousands of England’s vital flood defences were in such a state of ruin last year they would fail to protect communities from extreme weather, an investigation has found.

More than 3,400 of England’s “high consequence” flood assets, defined as those where there is a high risk to life and property if they fail, were judged by the Environment Agency to be in such a bad condition they were almost useless.

This means that more than one in 20 of the country’s crucial flood defences were in disrepair in 2019-20, the highest proportion in years. This rose to nearly one in 10 in the regions battered by Storm Christoph last week...

...

Six of the UK’s wettest years on record have now occurred since 1998, with 2020 provisionally the sixth wettest since 1862, and scientists warn that they expect winters to become wetter and wetter as changes to the climate intensify.

One Met Office report has warned that an extended period of rain, like the one experienced in the UK in 2013-4, when 10,000 homes were flooded, is now seven times more likely because of global heating....

 

 

Edited by Saving For a Space Ship
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14 hours ago, househunter123 said:

Saw a Sky News report yesterday. Poor bloke had his house flooded, twice in two years. Bought it a couple of years back, first time buyer was tears . Really felt for the fella.

Very sad - I wonder was it bad luck or an incompetent surveyor.

 

12 hours ago, Freki said:

The only problem with that it doesn't take into account any changes.

For example a) a river could have been culvetted and so less likely to flood

b) someone builds lots of housing near a river making it easier for it to flood on to other land.

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