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What Not To Say In A Performance Review....

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http://www.independent.co.uk/news/business/performance-reviews-33-things-you-should-never-say-a6764701.html

Michael Kerr, an international business speaker and author of "The Humor Advantage," says it's tempting and all too easy if you are on the receiving end of a review to express frustration at the process or get defensive. But you should resist the temptation, he says, "because you'll want to demonstrate that you are truly listening to what's being said and taking it all in without rushing to judgment," and that you are open to receiving honest feedback and willing to learn and grow.

..

'But that's not in my job description' or 'But that's not my responsibility'

"Expressing these sentiments raises the ire of any supervisor because it makes you look like you are more concerned about shirking responsibility than you are about doing what needs to be done to help the team or organisation succeed," says Kerr. "Managers want people who will do whatever needs doing regardless of whose responsibility it is."

'I'm not paid to ...' or 'I'm not paid enough to ...'

Again, this makes you sound not only defensive, but as though you are shirking responsibility and merely interested in doing the bare minimum required to get by, Kerr says.

'If you think I'm bad, you should see ...'

Don't point fingers. A performance review is rarely, if ever, the time to talk about other colleagues, especially in a critical way. Kerr says this makes you look petty and as though you are passing the blame around or making excuses.

With some of these I'm sure the other side of this is if you did something that isn't your responsibility and it went wrong you'll be hauled over the coals for over stepping the mark.

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http://www.independent.co.uk/news/business/performance-reviews-33-things-you-should-never-say-a6764701.html

With some of these I'm sure the other side of this is if you did something that isn't your responsibility and it went wrong you'll be hauled over the coals for over stepping the mark.

What a load of old shite.

The most important thing in a performance review is to tell your supervisor that you a subscriber to guns and ammo and that your "anger management" issues are currently under control just so long as you keep taking the medication.

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What a load of old shite.

The most important thing in a performance review is to tell your supervisor that you a subscriber to guns and ammo and that your "anger management" issues are currently under control just so long as you keep taking the medication.

ROFL! :D

Or just say you are a big fan of the movie 'The Office'... ;)

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Seriously the most important thing in most big corporations is to follow the corporate processes. If you deviate and f*ck up then you will be crucified in any performance review. So long as you follow the documented procedures no matter how useless or insane then you will generally be OK. In fact in my experience it is people who show initiative who generally make managers feel uneasy.

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And organisations want the maximum work out of you for the minimum money as this article confirms.

I offer the opposite arrangement.

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Couple of points on this:

Feedback should always be taken positively, negative feedback is an opportunity to improve. Feedback is rarely genuinely hostile, and if it is then the most disarming thing you can say is 'thank you'.

The other thing is that in order to be held accountable you must possess the means and ability to complete the task you are being held accountable for. If you don't have the skill to negotiate the means, then you don't have the ability.

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Take a pad and pen and take detailed notes during the meeting of literally everything they say. Ask them to repeat things so that you heard it correctly and so that you can note it down properly - word for word. They don't like that but they can't accuse you of not being responsible, not taking it/them seriously or not taking notice.

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Somehow I've managed to avoid ever having one anywhere I've worked.

I always suspected they were just a way to manage wage expectations. "We would like to give you the 20% wage increase you asked for, but looking at your performance review..."

Perhaps I'm too cynical.

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What a load of old shite.

The most important thing in a performance review is to tell your supervisor that you a subscriber to guns and ammo and that your "anger management" issues are currently under control just so long as you keep taking the medication.

I actually worked with a guy who told his boss at one of those he would burn her house down with her in it if she didnt get off his case.He wasnt joking.She got off his case.

Those performance reviews were one of the reasons i opted out of working for other people.Couldnt stand wasting an hour of my life in them.

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'Who told you that?' or 'Where did you hear that?'

This also makes you sound petty and defensive — and worse, may give the impression that you will seek retribution after the review, Kerr says. "Better to ask, 'Can you give me a specific example of when I demonstrated that behavior so I know what to work on in the future?'"

Disagree.

If they're using something a third party said to criticise you then they should give the name - that person should be held responsible and accountable for what they say and the specific thing/incident they're talking about. They're taking the third party word over the person being reviewed.

It's matter of responsibility otherwise the review is a complete sham.

That's not retribution.

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Nah, I'll stick to saying what I damned well think. Bowing and scraping and towing the corporate bullsh1t line isn't worth it for a bit of extra money that I don't particularly need and I've too much contempt for that sort of thing and those who indulge it even if it is little more than saying the "right" thing. The whole idea of a review is a waste of time anyway.

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In a small outfit, your manager will have direct experience of your work abilities. In a large outfit, there will be a reliance on rumours and the process is as obscure as Kafka's Trial, and relies on luck. :huh:

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Take a pad and pen and take detailed notes during the meeting of literally everything they say. Ask them to repeat things so that you heard it correctly and so that you can note it down properly - word for word. They don't like that but they can't accuse you of not being responsible, not taking it/them seriously or not taking notice.

Good avice, if you hear anything even slighty negative. :ph34r:

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http://www.independent.co.uk/news/business/performance-reviews-33-things-you-should-never-say-a6764701.html

With some of these I'm sure the other side of this is if you did something that isn't your responsibility and it went wrong you'll be hauled over the coals for over stepping the mark.

yes, that's a possibility. :wacko:

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Somehow I've managed to avoid ever having one anywhere I've worked.

I always suspected they were just a way to manage wage expectations. "We would like to give you the 20% wage increase you asked for, but looking at your performance review..."

Perhaps I'm too cynical.

I actually worked with a guy who told his boss at one of those he would burn her house down with her in it if she didnt get off his case.He wasnt joking.She got off his case.

Those performance reviews were one of the reasons i opted out of working for other people.Couldnt stand wasting an hour of my life in them.

I have had very few performance reviews and ultimately, opted out of being an employee because of managers

At the few reviews I did have, I knew that my mangers also had targets, one of which was their responsibility for my career development, so after we had gone through all the hurdles I had jumped and targets I had met during the year, I always asked my managers to detail the career development opportunities they had created for me.

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Seriously the most important thing in most big corporations is to follow the corporate processes. If you deviate and f*ck up then you will be crucified in any performance review. So long as you follow the documented procedures no matter how useless or insane then you will generally be OK. In fact in my experience it is people who show initiative who generally make managers feel uneasy.

Trouble is ultimately that this type of non-thinking fails. Stalin ensured initiative couldn't be used and commanders had to follow the party line, trouble is in a war you need people to think on their feet.

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I've had these fairly frequently, both giving the review and receiving one, and have always insisted that they are held away from the office over a coffee. Sometimes I have been the only manager doing this and had to defend it.

That seems to have the effect of making them a constructive chat with the form as an after-thought.

Where I have had difficult staff I have pulled them up on it before the review, by disciplinary if necessary, so that the review isn't used for breaking bad news.

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I work in a company where performance reviews are taken very seriously - lots of thought and consideration about the outcomes, and pretty much zero chance for some rogue manager with a vendetta to distort the results for personal reasons. I've been (and still am) on both sides of this process. It is used to define bonuses, promotion and at the other end, who really needs to go and do something else.

Regardless of the result, there are indeed two groups - people who engage with it and try and learn, and people who just tolerate it and don't listen. You can get away with the latter when you are doing really well, but in any other situation you need to listen and understand. For whatever reason, a large group of people in the company is coming to the conclusion that you are not doing well - if you want to stay there, listen to the feedback.

People who consistently do badly fall into two groups. There are people who are quite frankly in the wrong job. They are good people, but we are making them do things that they are not good at. They'd be much better off doing something else. And then there are people who just can't cut it. They will produce excuse after excuse (its always someone else's fault) but when you are looking at a complete file over many years, they've either been incredibly unlucky, or they are just not very good.

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I've had these fairly frequently, both giving the review and receiving one, and have always insisted that they are held away from the office over a coffee. Sometimes I have been the only manager doing this and had to defend it.

That seems to have the effect of making them a constructive chat with the form as an after-thought.

Where I have had difficult staff I have pulled them up on it before the review, by disciplinary if necessary, so that the review isn't used for breaking bad news.

Few managers understand how to conduct a review or its purpose, many see it as a way to demonstrate who is boss.

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I work in a company where performance reviews are taken very seriously - lots of thought and consideration about the outcomes, and pretty much zero chance for some rogue manager with a vendetta to distort the results for personal reasons. I've been (and still am) on both sides of this process. It is used to define bonuses, promotion and at the other end, who really needs to go and do something else.

Regardless of the result, there are indeed two groups - people who engage with it and try and learn, and people who just tolerate it and don't listen. You can get away with the latter when you are doing really well, but in any other situation you need to listen and understand. For whatever reason, a large group of people in the company is coming to the conclusion that you are not doing well - if you want to stay there, listen to the feedback.

People who consistently do badly fall into two groups. There are people who are quite frankly in the wrong job. They are good people, but we are making them do things that they are not good at. They'd be much better off doing something else. And then there are people who just can't cut it. They will produce excuse after excuse (its always someone else's fault) but when you are looking at a complete file over many years, they've either been incredibly unlucky, or they are just not very good.

I presume it is a successful company

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Nah, I'll stick to saying what I damned well think. Bowing and scraping and towing the corporate bullsh1t line isn't worth it for a bit of extra money that I don't particularly need and I've too much contempt for that sort of thing and those who indulge it even if it is little more than saying the "right" thing. The whole idea of a review is a waste of time anyway.

Many years ago my boss asked for my honest opinion of him. I told him that I thought he was a c*** :)

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