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Guest_lauralondon_*

People Who Can Afford To Pay For A Procedure Privately But Make Their Life A Misery Demanding It On Nhs

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My parents have a friend with, apparently, quite rare condition that makes her life miserable (incontinent and in constantly in pain). There is a new procedure that could improve her quality of life drastically however it isn't available on the NHS. Would cost about 20k. She's spent the last two years fighting the NHS to have them do this procedure. She could easily afford it but instead puts her life on hold trying to get the NHS to pay for it. Just makes no sense, if you don't have health you don't have anything.

Another one of their boomer friends spent almost a year waiting to have her varicose veins done, purely for cosmetic reasons. She did get this done on the NHS in the end and then didn't bother to wear the compression tights so they've come back!

Both of these people spend their money on fancy cars and holidays, but want to spend zero on their health. What a screwed up mindset.

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I think doctors are paid well enough. £20k to sort out your bum seems a bit excessive! :blink:

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As vast amounts of your taxes go upon paying for something you never use, then when the time comes that you do need it you should be able to get it.

I'd also wait to have it done on the NHS on principle.

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As vast amounts of your taxes go upon paying for something you never use, then when the time comes that you do need it you should be able to get it.

I'd also wait to have it done on the NHS on principle.

Me too.

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I also have some sympathy.. these will be people who have paid in for years.

It's not like we get an option to pay 30% less tax if we take private insurance or pay for our own treatments.

I guess the argument is that these treatments are outside the scope of the what is covered by our "NHS insurance" so in effect we've never paid for that "cover".

I'm surprised that the person with the dodgy bum couldn't get it sorted out, that sounds like a fairly genuine medical issue as opposed to a few varicose veins

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As vast amounts of your taxes go upon paying for something you never use, then when the time comes that you do need it you should be able to get it.

I'd also wait to have it done on the NHS on principle.

Same here. I've only ever needed treatment on the NHS once, and I suppose I was lucky enough to have what I needed doing defined as an emergency operation, so it got done quickly.

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I'd like to think a difficult operation could by done by the NHS if I went horribly wrong. After all we've been paying these people's golf course fees for years. Not sure I'd expect my stomach stapled up if I got really fat, but broken arms and stuff should be routine. Maybe some health authorities are paying too much for "the machine that goes ping"?

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Microwave?

It might well be. The hospital administrator wouldn't know the difference. :blink:

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I have a neurological disease and I'm always on the lookout for private treatments and doctors and procedures that could make my life different. In particular I want to improve my ability to work and earn a living.

Seems to be common in my patients group. We have internet forums where post research (often from abroad, ideas and experience). I don't know many patients who are not actively paying for experimental treatment if they can afford to and if the risks aren't too large. The NHS has a shortage of neurologists and I get one rushed appointment each year.

I'd say there is a difference between my group of often working age patients and older people I know. Elderly relatives either with lots of money and those living on a pension seem to be less likely to be taking an active interest in their health. There seems to be some fear around operations in particular and because they don't have to earn a living they keep putting it off.

We have osteoporosis in my family. Some of my aunts have worked hard on this, researched preventative measures and had joints replaced when needed. Others have buried their heads in the sand and suffered a lot before finally having joints replaced. One Aunt did all the lifestyle changes she could but then suffered for so long trying to avoid the operation that she was never the same again.

I wonder though how much would enjoy fancy holidays though if incontinent and in constant pain? Travel would be very hard and they would have difficulty lying on a beach or relaxing due to the pain.

It's a strange position to be in.

They may be worried that the 20k procedure would not work or be able to find a doctor they can rely on to perform it or the aftercare needed. If the NHS doesn't do this procedure where is the evidence that they would be cured and are they in a position to be able to judge the evidence? I know that the NHS can be behind in research and "evidence based" can be political.

I'm faced by a constant barrage of claims that my disease could be cured. Some of them are more plausible than others.

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The only thing stopping me from paying private a few years back, was the thought it might be a waste of money anyway if unsuccessful ...If I had a relative certainty that an op would work that wasn`t available on nhs, I would jump at it....life is too short to always feel validated and get a return on investments/insurance...

I think Flopsy is right too. The older people are the more they want to hang on to money just in case....in case of what, is questionable, but then who says humans are rational.?

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Frankly, I'd rather see my NI money spent on people whose bowels that don't work, than a vain girl who wants bigger tits, or an unpleasnt tattoo removed.

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That's hardly the same. These people have cash in the bank to spend on Luxury's and the first one is making her life a missery and putting it on hold as she wants a freebe from the NHS. It isn't a bottomless pit that can fund every single procedure people want, especially if its a new an not proven one.

The existence of a health service doesn't mean all health care will be free.

She could spend several more years fighting for this operation, as her health Carrys on deteriorating. Its not an issue with her bum! Who started that? She's unable to leave the house for long and can't stand / walk for long either.

sounds like a cauda equina syndrome case...

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That's hardly the same. These people have cash in the bank to spend on Luxury's and the first one is making her life a missery and putting it on hold as she wants a freebe from the NHS. It isn't a bottomless pit that can fund every single procedure people want, especially if its a new an not proven one.

The existence of a health service doesn't mean all health care will be free.

She could spend several more years fighting for this operation, as her health Carrys on deteriorating. Its not an issue with her bum! Who started that? She's unable to leave the house for long and can't stand / walk for long either.

If the NHS was voluntary I'd agree with you, but it isn't.

Had it been voluntary I'd have opted out (I paid for private health insurance anyway), but I couldn't, so now I'm retired I expect the NHS to take care of me.

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If the NHS was voluntary I'd agree with you, but it isn't.

Had it been voluntary I'd have opted out (I paid for private health insurance anyway), but I couldn't, so now I'm retired I expect the NHS to take care of me.

I thought you were practically an ex-pat Bruce, don't you spend a lot of time abroad these days?

You want to keep an eye on that.. I think they're trying to stop people living abroad having access to the NHS at all (even if you did pay in all your life!)

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I thought you were practically an ex-pat Bruce, don't you spend a lot of time abroad these days?

You want to keep an eye on that.. I think they're trying to stop people living abroad having access to the NHS at all (even if you did pay in all your life!)

No, I live in the UK where I pay tax and council tax, but take two or three longish holidays a year.

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I thought you were practically an ex-pat Bruce, don't you spend a lot of time abroad these days?

You want to keep an eye on that.. I think they're trying to stop people living abroad having access to the NHS at all (even if you did pay in all your life!)

• limit Housing Benefit and Pension Credit payments to 4 weeks for claimants who

are outside Great Britain, from April 2016. At present, Housing Benefit recipients can

go abroad for up to 13 weeks while continuing to receive Housing Benefit. The benefit

system should not subsidise those on benefits to go abroad for extended periods: this reform

will ensure the benefit system is not paying the rent of people who go abroad for more than

4 weeks at a time

And reducing benefits.

but if you can afford to go abroad for 13 weeks or more then surely you shouldn't be getting the HB and TC anyway - does it just not show there is something wrong with how benefits are dished out?

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As vast amounts of your taxes go upon paying for something you never use, then when the time comes that you do need it you should be able to get it.

I'd also wait to have it done on the NHS on principle.

That's why the French or German system is fundamentally fairer.

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• limit Housing Benefit and Pension Credit payments to 4 weeks for claimants who

are outside Great Britain, from April 2016. At present, Housing Benefit recipients can

go abroad for up to 13 weeks while continuing to receive Housing Benefit. The benefit

system should not subsidise those on benefits to go abroad for extended periods: this reform

will ensure the benefit system is not paying the rent of people who go abroad for more than

4 weeks at a time

And reducing benefits.

but if you can afford to go abroad for 13 weeks or more then surely you shouldn't be getting the HB and TC anyway - does it just not show there is something wrong with how benefits are dished out?

Now that I agree with.

As I mentioned on another thread, there is a UK benefit claimant here in Spain, on a six week stay, who is paying 30% more than us because she can't be bothered to shop around.

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And reducing benefits.

but if you can afford to go abroad for 13 weeks or more then surely you shouldn't be getting the HB and TC anyway - does it just not show there is something wrong with how benefits are dished out?

Surely if you're not working - or can work anywhere (e.g. a writer who doesn't need to sit at a desk) - then 13 weeks abroad doesn't have to cost anything more than the modest premium for camping fuel over mains gas?

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How about the situation where everyone agrees it is medically urgent. Like a cancer operation where delay means it'll spread and become inoperable?

Go private immediately. 'Cos with the NHS, once your forever-week-after-next operation has been delayed several months, you're on your deathbed.

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Surely if you're not working - or can work anywhere (e.g. a writer who doesn't need to sit at a desk) - then 13 weeks abroad doesn't have to cost anything more than the modest premium for camping fuel over mains gas?

Unless the benefit claimant is leaving a UK residence (paid for by benefits) empty, whilst spending more benefit money on holiday accommodation abroad. It's not the fuel cost, it's the cost of accommodation.

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How about the situation where everyone agrees it is medically urgent. Like a cancer operation where delay means it'll spread and become inoperable?

Go private immediately. 'Cos with the NHS, once your forever-week-after-next operation has been delayed several months, you're on your deathbed.

I think the NHS is pretty good with cancer and other life threatening illnesses.

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How about the situation where everyone agrees it is medically urgent. Like a cancer operation where delay means it'll spread and become inoperable?

Go private immediately. 'Cos with the NHS, once your forever-week-after-next operation has been delayed several months, you're on your deathbed.

Forcefully insisting upon it works. I know somebody who refused to go home until they had their op, so they got it.

They weren't aggressive, but politely said that they would stay in the hospital (sleeping in reception if necessary) until it got sorted.

This kind of behaviour means that you cease to be a name on a list and become a problem closer to home that gets solved.

I would add that it was a reasonable request for a routine operation in the first place.

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