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TheBlueCat

Rail Gun, Be Very Afraid!

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So a traditional gun powder projectile can be sent 13nm, and this railgun and shoot a projectile 110nm. Just some issues:

1. The projectile is unguided, so how will it hit it's target if the visual range on a good day is 10nm?

2. Even if visual acquiring is done from a drone, the curvature of the earth would mean targetting would be very difficult.

3. An anti-ship missile launched from a air platform such as a drone or fighter would be lower risk, than sending in a capital ship to engage another capital ship.

4. Shore bombardment, again safer to have capital ships far from the target zone, and use cruise missiles (although more expensive, but money for war is generally unlimited), with a range of 600nm.

5. This kind of weapon is more suited for World War 3, rather than attacking terrorists within a civillian area.

6. Warships today rarely use their guns in anger, that is why newer ships have a much smaller gun than compared to older ships with the same purpose.

It will probably be useful as part of a package of other weapons for the captain to use, and probably not used that often.

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The Governments will buy too many! They will appear at army surplus shops, and I want one! :huh:

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So a traditional gun powder projectile can be sent 13nm, and this railgun and shoot a projectile 110nm. Just some issues:

1. The projectile is unguided, so how will it hit it's target if the visual range on a good day is 10nm?

2. Even if visual acquiring is done from a drone, the curvature of the earth would mean targetting would be very difficult.

The British army had this thoroughly worked out by 1917 and applied it successfully at the battle of Cambrai. If you have the map referances of gun and target you can calculate how to lay the gun. All the factors you mention and others can be allowed for. When I was shown how it was done, circa 1970, an A4 size form with the lines of the calculation on it was used. At that time the latest tech was a computer to replace the form, It occupied a large space in the back of a long wheelbase Land Rover.

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So a traditional gun powder projectile can be sent 13nm, and this railgun and shoot a projectile 110nm. Just some issues:

I guess the range is only one factor..

The other benefits are the speed to impact

The flatness of the trajectory

The extra energy

If** they can fire it precisely then not only can you puncture precision holes in warships and buildings but you could probably even take out incoming missiles.

**Big IF

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The gun is scary enough, but take a look at the Navy dude at 1 minute into this and then tell me you're not really afraid!

Isn't he related to those in charge of economic policy and house prices.

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The British army had this thoroughly worked out by 1917 and applied it successfully at the battle of Cambrai. If you have the map referances of gun and target you can calculate how to lay the gun. All the factors you mention and others can be allowed for. When I was shown how it was done, circa 1970, an A4 size form with the lines of the calculation on it was used. At that time the latest tech was a computer to replace the form, It occupied a large space in the back of a long wheelbase Land Rover.

I thought the British and US navies had gun "computers" in WWII, it was how they beat the Japanese navy. In fact here is a Ford rangekeeper computer from WWII. These systems were still in use in the first Iraq war.

FordMk1Rangekeeper.jpg

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I thought the British and US navies had gun "computers" in WWII, it was how they beat the Japanese navy. In fact here is a Ford rangekeeper computer from WWII. These systems were still in use in the first Iraq war.

FordMk1Rangekeeper.jpg

Yes. Electro mechanical analogue devices. Not very practical for the Army in the field. The Army version occupied all of the back of a LWB Landrover and was a bit delicate. The paper version occupied an officers pocket and always worked. My knowledge of this subject is now exhausted. Any real Gunners out there?

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