Jump to content
House Price Crash Forum

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

bergkamp N4

"can't Pay We Take It Away." How Can Anyone Do This Work?

Recommended Posts

Watching Wednesday's gone edition of can't pay .... Channel 5 on catch up this morning.

The bailiffs turf out a couple of their rented home. The couple have a small child who is on a life support system and from the facts we are told they have a new home lined up in 2 days time.

Leaving aside the Landlords son who was on hand to witness the event & was a complete dick I just can't believe the indifference of the bailiffs as they carry out the high court order. The bailiffs make all the right noises but it's the not me guv attitude which grinds my gears.

We all have to work to support ourselves & our families but sticking a family out on the street with what started as an hours notice I don't think I would ever do that even if I was starving.

I would be interested in any other posters view as to why people do this work & their motivation as well.

In other episodes of the show Paul) the older grey haired bailiff acts like he cares as he is enforcing but his bright red face indicates a big drink prob

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There will have been ample opportunities given to resolve the matter, some people just think that if they ignore all and any communication the problem will go away. The short notice eviction from the high court isn't issued on a whim from the landlord, it has taken many months to get to this stage and due process will have been followed or the court would not have issued the notice.

People think they won't be evicted 'cos it's my human right init' - anyway don't worry, they'll get emergency accommodation at the council's your expense so it all works out hunky dory

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

How far behind were they in their rent? Were they issued a s8/s21 notice which they ignored? Were they told by the council to stay put?

High Court enforcement is a nasty process, the tenants should have had notice of proceedings, there ought to be good reason why the County Court route isn't being used and a High Court Judge would have signed off the repossession.

http://www.lawgazette.co.uk/law/benchmarks/residential-possession-speedy-eviction/5039581.fullarticle

Would I be a high court bailiff, no. The law may be an ass but someone has to enforce it.

I'm sure if High Court bailiffs were knocking on the door of a LL to get money owed to tenant we'd cheering them on (well I would anyway).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If the facts are exactly as you say Bergkamp then this is dreadful.

Although I tend to think that the intention is to outrage for dramatic effect so these are not the facts.

Being a bailiff is a standard job for unskilled men who can deal with the risk of assault like security guards and doormen. The one chap I know who went into it had got fed up with bar work and couldn't just sign on as he could always get bar work.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I would not be a bailiff, taking people's "stuff". :unsure:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The only real difference between a bailiff's job and many others is that it's right on the front line. I don't think morally it's any different from, say, firing someone from a job (something I've had to do a few times). Having said that, yes, I couldn't do it either regardless of the rights/wrongs in the specific case.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The only real difference between a bailiff's job and many others is that it's right on the front line. I don't think morally it's any different from, say, firing someone from a job (something I've had to do a few times). Having said that, yes, I couldn't do it either regardless of the rights/wrongs in the specific case.

I've never had to "fire" anyone. It must be unpleasant. :blink:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've watched the show quite a bit and the majority I'd have few qualms about throwing on to the street. A lot of them take the p*ss, one guy had to go back into the house to get his hidden money stash. He had spent months ignoring the county court notices and not paying any rent while trashing his rented house. Then calling racism and shouting about his rights.

On the other end there have been examples of people having had a life threatening illness and falling behind on bills etc. after losing work. I've always seen the bailiffs act very compassionately in these examples and it clearly affects them. It would kill me to do that to anyone, not sure I could.

Some people think they are above the law and find themselves surprised when the law meets them head-on. Terrible for people down on their luck or with small children involved though so on balance I couldn't do it either. I won't judge anyone who does though, they need to put a roof over their head too and are doing a necessary job.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As with most things; There's two sides to every story and then there's the truth.

That program will never show all the facts of the matter, but show what it wants to create the mini-story in each (either fan-faring the evictee or the landlord)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Could their be another reason for this program other than car crash TV ...household debt at record highs must keep the proles paying

It`s not by chance the program only tends to show repossession of rented houses and commercial debt where the High Court has powers of entry

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Could their be another reason for this program other than car crash TV ...household debt at record highs must keep the proles paying

It`s not by chance the program only tends to show repossession of rented houses and commercial debt where the High Court has powers of entry

Nope, it shows owneroccupiers getting hit too

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

They took his 48" TV.

What for? It's hardly a Faberge "egg"?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've never had to "fire" anyone. It must be unpleasant. :blink:

It is, indeed, f*cking horrible most of the time. Very occasionally it's ok though. I had one case where the company I worked for was making deep cuts and I had to make a woman who was out on maternity leave redundant - she'd already decided not to come back anyway and was delighted with the cheque for 6 months salary we sent her. In another instance I had to fire a guy who was a total psycho (not hired by me) and, quite frankly, seeing him squirm was a genuine pleasure. Normally though it's just depressing and upsetting for everyone concerned.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So what?

It`s a propaganda program with no purpose other than trying scare people under false pretenses ,no court has the right to force entry in to anyone's home to collect consumer/personal debt other than take possession of a rental property on the instruction of the LL

But the program sends a clear messages, of this is what will happen to anyone that don`t keep up their payments

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I would not be a bailiff, taking people's "stuff". :unsure:

But at the point these guys are called in, it's not their stuff anymore, it's the property of the courts/claimant.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't have anything "on tick" apart from the mortgage. I think most of my furniture would end up in the charity shop where it came from. Bailiffs are rotten. There, I have said it!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't have anything "on tick" apart from the mortgage. I think most of my furniture would end up in the charity shop where it came from. Bailiffs are rotten. There, I have said it!

But "on tick" is very much the way that it's going in the UK. Twenty years ago I would read local papers and their weekend fliers in the US and all significant consumer goods (cars, computers, fridges) were quoted at a "per month" price. And usually there was no outright purchase price given.

We're going the same way, albeit slowly, it's most noticeable with cars / vans where a monthly price is quoted.

It's not necessarily a bad thing if used appropriately, such as by somebody who could afford to buy a new car but likes a lease car so they get a new one every three years, but when people do it either recklessly or because they have no other option then you start regularly seeing the repo man.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

But "on tick" is very much the way that it's going in the UK. Twenty years ago I would read local papers and their weekend fliers in the US and all significant consumer goods (cars, computers, fridges) were quoted at a "per month" price. And usually there was no outright purchase price given.

We're going the same way, albeit slowly, it's most noticeable with cars / vans where a monthly price is quoted.

It's not necessarily a bad thing if used appropriately, such as by somebody who could afford to buy a new car but likes a lease car so they get a new one every three years, but when people do it either recklessly or because they have no other option then you start regularly seeing the repo man.

I might be getting a lease car, if a particular job turns up. Generally my thinking is if you can't pay for it outright, you shouldn't have it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • The Prime Minister stated that there were three Brexit options available to the UK:   26 members have voted

    1. 1. Which of the Prime Minister's options would you choose?


      • Leave with the negotiated deal
      • Remain
      • Leave with no deal

    Please sign in or register to vote in this poll. View topic


×

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.