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SarahBell

Fund Raiser Idea. Council Tax For Students

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There are about 2299355 students in the UK as of the stats I found here

https://www.hesa.ac.uk/stats


None of those people pay council tax (assuming they all live with other students)

So do the landlords of those buildings pay council tax in any shape or form for those properties (Am thinking huge student halls as well as private houses)

What effect would charging 10% council tax to students have?


Given that job seekers now have to contribute towards CT - is it only fair that this burden is shared out a little with this huge number of people currently exempt?

It's certainly help councils who are struggling now to make ends meet.

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Yep. And council tax for people on benefit too.

I'm not 100% why everyone was so upset about the poll tax.

Maybe they should have pitched it - poll tax @ £300/y per adult in a household.

Or council tax of £1500/y.

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Council tax should be paid by the property owner as it is New Zealand and elsewhere I'm sure.

It's paid by the property owner in Northern Ireland too.

Very very few renters pay council tax here (rates).

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Council tax should be paid by the property owner as it is New Zealand and elsewhere I'm sure.

Back in the day rates used to be paid by the property owner - if you rented then the landlord paid them (and water too!).

Then the Poll Tax > Community Charge > Council Tax came in and suddenly it was the tenant's responsibility. And of course landlords didn't reduce rent to reflect the fact they were no longer paying so it was an instant effective rent rise of about £100 a month.

I remember it well - quite a big rise in outgoings for me at the time.

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You're showing your age Renting Forever...I even remember the days when the water rates were included in your rates ie no separate charge for water :)

I can't imagine anyone would become a student if they had to pay council tax on top of all the fees, rent, general living costs. A 3 year course on £9Kper annum plus hall fees/rent plus food etc must mean a total bill of at least £45K at the moment. Any more would cripple them.

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The effect would be that the government would increase the max student loan to compensate. Students would take out the max but never pay it back. Taxpayer still receives a right royal shafting.

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My fund raiser idea....

Compulsorily purchase lots of industrial farmland at prevailing farm prices, grant it planning permission and sell it off to the highest bidders for building on. Tax unbuilt land that has been granted planning permission to hurry them along. Provide social housing with controlled rents.

That would create a massive income, get houses built and reduce housing benefit.

Kill lots of birds with a very simple stone. Not radical - exactly how we ran arch capitalist city state Hong Kong.

"Tax unbuilt land that has been granted planning permission to hurry them along".

The level of taxation is important - tax less than the increase in value still gives an incentive just to hoard the land. Tax them annually at the amount that the land increases in value by each year. Either that or just compulsory purchase it at a penalty valuation and that would really get them moving.

Edited by billybong

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You're showing your age Renting Forever...I even remember the days when the water rates were included in your rates ie no separate charge for water :)

Fast forward to my generation and those sorts of things seem like pure fantasy. I'm 27. Oh how times have changed :lol::lol::lol:

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Fast forward to my generation and those sorts of things seem like pure fantasy. I'm 27. Oh how times have changed :lol::lol::lol:

It was only 20 years ago!

I've only recently got used to being seen as an old fart. On my last trip to the doctor I got a lecture on how I'd lose muscle mass once I hit 50, and realised that the young whippersnapper in front of me had categorised me as "starting to get on a bit". :-(

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There are about 2299355 students in the UK as of the stats I found here

https://www.hesa.ac.uk/stats

None of those people pay council tax (assuming they all live with other students)

So do the landlords of those buildings pay council tax in any shape or form for those properties (Am thinking huge student halls as well as private houses)

What effect would charging 10% council tax to students have?

Given that job seekers now have to contribute towards CT - is it only fair that this burden is shared out a little with this huge number of people currently exempt?

It's certainly help councils who are struggling now to make ends meet.

Well, I tend to think that students should get the same benefits as unemployed people (cash, HB, access to training, council tax) - why do you get money for sitting around going to the efforts to find a job but not for going to the efforts of getting a further education so that you can find a job? So you can imagine I think this is a bad idea.

But for the specifics - why not give students access to council tax relief (as now), but make overseas students pay. I don't see why they should get access to our council provided services while they are in the country but not pay anything for them. It would probably be difficult for EU students (they could change the eligibility rules but they won't), but there are only 100,000 of them. There are 300,000 non EU international students, so about 10% of student numbers - so the 10% idea of your for all students would be the same income as 100% CT for international students.

Also, the international students in the UK tend to be from high income families overseas, so they could probably afford it...

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why don't me avoid shafting the young, and instead shaft the old who have spent their whole lives shafting the young.

being a student is not all roses its expensive, the only real joy is being young and new experiences and relationships. for most people under 30 it will be the best time in their life, afterwards its straight back to being shafted by the old. a whole lifetime a poor quality of life no matter how hard you try.

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Yep. And council tax for people on benefit too.

I'm not 100% why everyone was so upset about the poll tax.

Maybe they should have pitched it - poll tax @ £300/y per adult in a household.

Or council tax of £1500/y.

It was hard to enforce and seen as unfair by many people. Obviously a fatal combination.

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It was only 20 years ago!

I've only recently got used to being seen as an old fart. On my last trip to the doctor I got a lecture on how I'd lose muscle mass once I hit 50, and realised that the young whippersnapper in front of me had categorised me as "starting to get on a bit". :-(

I was described in my notes as an 'elderly primigravida' when I was expecting my first baby.

I was 28.

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why don't me avoid shafting the young, and instead shaft the old who have spent their whole lives shafting the young.

being a student is not all roses its expensive, the only real joy is being young and new experiences and relationships. for most people under 30 it will be the best time in their life, afterwards its straight back to being shafted by the old. a whole lifetime a poor quality of life no matter how hard you try.

+1 -- they have suffered enough (I'm 36 but never really grew up)

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why don't me avoid shafting the young, and instead shaft the old who have spent their whole lives shafting the young.

being a student is not all roses its expensive, the only real joy is being young and new experiences and relationships. for most people under 30 it will be the best time in their life, afterwards its straight back to being shafted by the old. a whole lifetime a poor quality of life no matter how hard you try.

Darn right. Students now leave uni tens of thousands in debt, in the days of the poll tax they would have had a maintenance grant and free tuition.

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Remove the exemption and tighten up HMO rules so that every HMO actually is a HMO. Then thousands of landlords will be liable for council tax.

A typical landlord reaction would be to increase the rents. So the governet would also need to cap rents. That may not be practical admittedly but it's worth investigating.

Another option would be for the government to provide large loans to universities to build extra student accommodation. A sound investment that will deliver a reasonable return for the government particularly if they share ownership.

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It was only 20 years ago!

I've only recently got used to being seen as an old fart. On my last trip to the doctor I got a lecture on how I'd lose muscle mass once I hit 50, and realised that the young whippersnapper in front of me had categorised me as "starting to get on a bit". :-(

the-simpsons-s5e4_200x113.jpg

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