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Dismantling A Sealed Plug

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I could do with some opinions on how best to go about dismantling and reassembling a DC power supply lead, with a sealed plug at one end, and one of these things at the other. To save you clicking on the link, imagine a phone charger or router power supply type of thing.

I need to run this thing through a wall so that the plug is connected to the mains socket on the inside, and obviously it would need a bloody great big hole to pass the jack through. So I'm wondering what would be best:

  1. Snip the plug and rewire into a normal "unsealed" one
  2. Snip the jack and buy a new one as linked above - but assume this needs some sort of tool as well
  3. Cut the actual cable and rejoin it with insulated connectors

I realise that whatever I do it's going to kill the warranty, but that's fine as long as I pick the option least likely to burn the house down. And apologies for the stupid question, but I am genuinely crap with electrics, so I don't want to do it the way I see fit only to have some fireman standing there speechless at my stupidity as he douses the remnants of the ashes.

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I could do with some opinions on how best to go about dismantling and reassembling a DC power supply lead, with a sealed plug at one end, and one of these things at the other. To save you clicking on the link, imagine a phone charger or router power supply type of thing.

I need to run this thing through a wall so that the plug is connected to the mains socket on the inside, and obviously it would need a bloody great big hole to pass the jack through. So I'm wondering what would be best:

  1. Snip the plug and rewire into a normal "unsealed" one
  2. Snip the jack and buy a new one as linked above - but assume this needs some sort of tool as well
  3. Cut the actual cable and rejoin it with insulated connectors

I realise that whatever I do it's going to kill the warranty, but that's fine as long as I pick the option least likely to burn the house down. And apologies for the stupid question, but I am genuinely crap with electrics, so I don't want to do it the way I see fit only to have some fireman standing there speechless at my stupidity as he douses the remnants of the ashes.

I presume you cannot just make a smaller hole and put the jack through? If not, then you could make a small mains extension lead from a normal plug which you can open with a screwdriver, a bit of flex, drill a hole for the flex and then then wire on a single socket, effectively making a small home made extension lead. Or buy a cheap extension lead and remove and reattach the plug on that.

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I would go for 1. Wiring a 13 amp plug is dead easy. Stuff that deals with mains current is chunky and hard to get wrong. The plug was designed that way on the assumption that it would be fitted by people who were not electricians. Low voltage stuff is smaller and more delicate, may need soldering and would for me be harder. My opinion may be influenced by the fact that I grew up at a time when being able to wire a plug was seen as a basic life skill.

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Is it a "wall wart" type thing with integrated plug and transformer? If yes, cut the low voltage cable and rejoin. Ideally join using solder and heatshrink tubing, but, twisting the wires and plenty of insulation tape will work - its only 12V after all.

If it has a plug on the end of a cable, just cut it off and wire a new one on.

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Maybe the power brick would be the wrong side of the wall?

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I'd snip the plug - but then, I'm old school - I know how to wire a plug and jam naked wires into sockets using matchsticks! :ph34r:[Don't try this at homee]

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I'd snip the plug - but then, I'm old school - I know how to wire a plug and jam naked wires into sockets using matchsticks! :ph34r:[Don't try this at homee]

Ah, you have an Indian wiring qualification? :blink: That was not very PC of me but Indian street wiring is a marvel to behold.

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I'd snip the plug - but then, I'm old school - I know how to wire a plug and jam naked wires into sockets using matchsticks! :ph34r:[Don't try this at homee]

I seem to be aware that ramming a screwdriver into the earth socket before inserting the wire wrapped matchsticks in the live and neutral made a better contact. I have no idea how or when I acquired this knowledge. Possibly when I was a child, in what now feels like a previous geological epoch.

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Sorry for disappearing, I got a bit waylaid - but thanks for all the replies.

So 1 & 3 look like decent options, but someone asked whether the plug is a "wall wart" - um, I don't think so, although it's bigger than an old school plug, it's not one of those massive great chunky things.

I am more than capable of wiring a plug, it's just that I didn't want to do something stupid if there were a universally recognised preferred option.

I'm leaning toward option 3 at the moment, if only because I have the connectors and obligatory Halford's crimping tool.

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I think the important thing is is the voltage conversion contained within the 13 amp plug, like my cellphone charger. You can't replace that then, because it is more than just a plug. :huh:

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Once the epidermis is removed (straightforward if the mollusc has no shell) the internal organs can be easily seperated with a scalpel.

The mantle is a significant part of the anatomy of molluscs: it is the dorsal body wall which covers the organs of digestion, reproduction and movement.

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Sorry for disappearing, I got a bit waylaid - but thanks for all the replies.

So 1 & 3 look like decent options, but someone asked whether the plug is a "wall wart" - um, I don't think so, although it's bigger than an old school plug, it's not one of those massive great chunky things.

I am more than capable of wiring a plug, it's just that I didn't want to do something stupid if there were a universally recognised preferred option.

I'm leaning toward option 3 at the moment, if only because I have the connectors and obligatory Halford's crimping tool.

Finish it off by protecting the join with self amalgamating tape.

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If you do option 3, then snip each wire separately with an offset of about 2". When you put the heat shrink on it, it will be half the diameter than if you cut them at the same place.

------/------------------

----------------/--------

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I'd agree with going for 3...

...But in my experience threading a wire through a hole in a wall requires the hole to be somewhat bigger than the wire. Even bigger if it is a brick cavity wall, not so much if plasterboard. For a start the diameter has to be big enough for the bent coat-hanger (or whatever you use to do the threading), not the actual wire.

If it was an in-line plug I'd probably just make the hole big enough... But the right-angle connector might be too bulky.

But no qualms whatsoever with cutting the low DC cable. Offset joints good idea.

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I hate corded things with a passion, and want cordless wherever possible. Although, on the topic of soldering wires together I always hated gas soldering irons or the crappy battery cordless ones but wanted to solder without a wall socket.

So basically spent time and energy building this hybrid corded/cordless which uses a cordless drill battery to power a decent quality corded iron.

soldering thing 1.JPG

Safety first - automotive blade fuse to try and mitigate the risk of a lithium ion battery fire - a more frequent experience at my house than it ought to be.

soldering thing 2.JPG

Most of the (obsessive) amount of time went into getting the battery to hold firmly and reliable removal and insertion.

soldering thing 3.JPG

Now the whole thing is redundant as I've migrated to Milwaukee power tools as my main system and found a more compact and elegant solution anyway. Although I did lend it to someone who saw it and decided it would be useful for what they needed to do.

My advice therefore, to avoid the hassle of drilling, is to build a modest sized pebble-bed nuclear reactor in the room where you need the power. Just as you finish you will find fusion technology has produced a reactor that occupies 95% less space.

post-17575-0-03332400-1447706022_thumb.jpg

post-17575-0-57155200-1447706047_thumb.jpg

post-17575-0-22396100-1447706076_thumb.jpg

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Once the epidermis is removed (straightforward if the mollusc has no shell) the internal organs can be easily seperated with a scalpel.

The mantle is a significant part of the anatomy of molluscs: it is the dorsal body wall which covers the organs of digestion, reproduction and movement.

Thank you, that one made my evening :lol:

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Once the epidermis is removed (straightforward if the mollusc has no shell) the internal organs can be easily seperated with a scalpel.

The mantle is a significant part of the anatomy of molluscs: it is the dorsal body wall which covers the organs of digestion, reproduction and movement.

This is all very well if he were dismantling a sqealing pig, but I think this is more of a DIY query.

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Once the epidermis is removed (straightforward if the mollusc has no shell) the internal organs can be easily seperated with a scalpel.

The mantle is a significant part of the anatomy of molluscs: it is the dorsal body wall which covers the organs of digestion, reproduction and movement.

:lol::lol::lol::lol::lol::lol::lol::lol:

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Good God - if I tell my partner that I have actually been able to give someone some practical and potentially useful DIY advice, I won't be believed.

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