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Trampa501

Villages Where Everyone Moves Out

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In parts of Spain there are whole villages where over the last 80 years or so, everyone has moved out and relocated to the cities

http://www.spainbuddy.com/the-last-two/

Before the Spanish Civil War, La Estrella was a tiny but lively village in Spain with a population of roughly 200, but following the war’s end in 1939, many residents left to pursue work in cities. Continued shifting economic tides have left La Estrella, and many similar villages throughout Spain, all but abandoned. The Last Two profiles Juan Martín Colomer and his wife Sinforosa, La Estrella’s last inhabitants. Left childless since the death of their daughter decades ago, Martín longs for life in a less isolated place, while Sinforosa refuses to leave her home.

Are there such places in England? There may be small villages entirely composed of second homes?

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Some villages in the extremities of Lincolnshire (and I guess up in Cumbria, Northumberland) havent grown much. But generally, I guess in part, to the green belt and green field land surrounding cities and thus prohibiting the natural spread of cities, people who want a family home have little choice but to live in small villages well outside their place of work. Spains a lot bigger than England too...so where the Cambridge commuter belt for example stops, the Norwich or Ipswich one starts.

Heres a place in rural lincolnshire where the population peaked in the late 19th century...dozens of such places exist.

http://www.visionofbritain.org.uk/unit/10427289/cube/TOT_POP

I notice around German cities prices really fall away quite quickly once you are outside of the city limits...that despite commuter rail services that are far cheaper than the UK. It seems a cultural thing that continentals just prefer living in cities. Whether that continues once their cities are as, er, 'diverse' as ours remains to be seen.

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Lots of villagers had to move out when the land was enclosed and given to aristocrats.

People living in villages complain about population pressures "destroying the character of the area" but forget that in much of rural Britain the population density is lower now than it was 150 years ago.

Edited by Dorkins

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Some villages in the extremities of Lincolnshire (and I guess up in Cumbria, Northumberland) havent grown much. But generally, I guess in part, to the green belt and green field land surrounding cities and thus prohibiting the natural spread of cities, people who want a family home have little choice but to live in small villages well outside their place of work. Spains a lot bigger than England too...so where the Cambridge commuter belt for example stops, the Norwich or Ipswich one starts.

Heres a place in rural lincolnshire where the population peaked in the late 19th century...dozens of such places exist.

http://www.visionofbritain.org.uk/unit/10427289/cube/TOT_POP

I notice around German cities prices really fall away quite quickly once you are outside of the city limits...that despite commuter rail services that are far cheaper than the UK. It seems a cultural thing that continentals just prefer living in cities. Whether that continues once their cities are as, er, 'diverse' as ours remains to be seen.

this is definatley true in the German part of Switzerland, the city is for the rich people, and (relatively) poor people tend to live in large not particularly picturesque villages on the outskirts, property is cheaper there (though prices do not exactly plunge). Edited by reddog

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Lots of villagers had to move out when the land was enclosed and given to aristocrats.

People living in villages complain about population pressures "destroying the character of the area" but forget that in much of rural Britain the population density is lower now than it was 150 years ago.

Very good point. My village had 3x times the population density around 100 years ago - and supported quite a number of shops as a result. Hard to believe now. Partly down to larger families, people having/being willing to live in smaller spaces and the local mining industry - which has since near disappeared/become highly mechanised. I wouldn't be surprised to learn that no-one living in the village still works in it.

Edited by StainlessSteelCat

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I notice around German cities prices really fall away quite quickly once you are outside of the city limits...that despite commuter rail services that are far cheaper than the UK. It seems a cultural thing that continentals just prefer living in cities. Whether that continues once their cities are as, er, 'diverse' as ours remains to be seen.

I'd say it's pretty recent, the past 30 years or so, that it has become popular. I think the media played a BIG part in making the idea of village life popular (without bothering to mention the fact they live in an agricultural industrial estate).

If the BBC started doing A House In The Council Estate, or the DM had a Council Estate Living section, extolling the virtues of being able to get the little blue pill without a prescription, how the local young businessmen are able to undercut Currys for the latest 50"TV, or how the 18-year old locals are quite willing to participate in a bit of swinging if you ply them with enough booze. Then suddenly living in a 60's tower block would be the greatest thing ever.

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Romney Marsh in Kent. There are complete villages wiped off the map like Brookfield. Others like Fairfield and Okd Romney have churches fit for a few hundred people but only a handful of residents now. I think the decline in subsistence farming and malaria was responsible for the population decline.

Even towns like Winchelsea in East Sussex were once twice the size but silting harbours, different trade routes,technology and towns like London rising to the fore did for Winchelsea.

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Do you mean Brookland, in Kent? I lived in that area for a while down on the marshes, never heard of either Broomfields or Brookfield, but if they don't exist any more that could be why.

For anyone interested Romney Marsh is littered with old church ruins, eg here: http://romney.rdittest.co.uk/lostchurches

Edited by spunko2010

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In parts of Spain there are whole villages where over the last 80 years or so, everyone has moved out and relocated to the cities

http://www.spainbuddy.com/the-last-two/

Are there such places in England? There may be small villages entirely composed of second homes?

midsomer.

probably due to the suspiciously high mortality rate

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