Jump to content
House Price Crash Forum

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

Dave Beans

Would You Fly In A Chinese Plane?

Recommended Posts

I assume it is just an A320 rip-off. So no, no way would I get in one.

You might not have a choice in a decade's time.

Here's an interesting thought - 10 or 15 years from now Airbus and Boeing merging to fight the Chinese competition.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Given the longevity, reliability, and general build quality of most Chinese knock-offs, I will enourage my in laws to catch a flight in one as soon as may be convenient.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Given the longevity, reliability, and general build quality of most Chinese knock-offs, I will enourage my in laws to catch a flight in one as soon as may be convenient.

Difference is, this isn't designed, specced and QC'd by Western companies building in planned obsolescence in their mass off-shoring drive.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Whatever the maker's name, a lot of household elecrtronics is made in China.

The Japanese learned to make stuff really well.

The early Korean cars were awful, but they are not now.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Given flying in a plane is about confidence, surely the quality control on it will be high. Otherwise it will simply suffer the failure of the comet.

It would need to pass regular airworthiness tests in Europe (if its eventually used by European airlines)...Although "made in China" isn't really a badge of honour at the moment...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you read the article most of it, including the engine, are actually manufactured by Western companies.

The Chinese aren't dumb. They're starting with the basic stuff and developing the harder bits as they go along.

Too bad for us they aren't buying Rolls Royce engines. Seems to be all French and American.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Its not a CHhinese plane - but I am flying Air China next month.. :ph34r::blink:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The first 5+ years of production are pre-sold to Chinese operators, so we'll have a chance to see how many fail before they start being delivered to the west.

But China is possibly in the same position as Japan in the 70s. Perhaps think 'would I have laughed at the idea of driving a Japanese car in 1975. What about 1985?'.

(I'd say it has to get through a recession first, to rid itself of their first big import from the west - financial engineering taking over everything)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Don't think western engines and avionics will help break the A & B duopoly. They're relying on domestic carriers plus a couple of orders from Air Koryo and Cubana every 20 years.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I wouldn't fly in any new plane until it had been in service for at least a year. I don't see any reason that China can't build a safe one though.

Actually I usually have flown in old planes that have been "in service" for nearly as long as I have!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Whatever the maker's name, a lot of household elecrtronics is made in China.

The Japanese learned to make stuff really well.

The early Korean cars were awful, but they are not now.

Early Jap cars were awful too but they improved. They got to a stage when they became very good if you replaced the awful Jap tyres. Now you don't have to do that the Japs make some of the best tyres in the world.

Funny enough, I've just bought my first Jap car and I've just put Korean tyres on it.

However, fly on a Chinese built tubeliner? Not for a long time.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Don't think western engines and avionics will help break the A & B duopoly. They're relying on domestic carriers plus a couple of orders from Air Koryo and Cubana every 20 years.

They're not even that cheap - the projected purchase price is only a few million £ cheaper than an Airbus (about $68m vs $75m). I suppose the running costs might be lower, but they'd have to try very hard to compete on that front (just training the engineers on the new platform would cost $$$s). Domestic only for quite a few years.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

They're not even that cheap - the projected purchase price is only a few million £ cheaper than an Airbus (about $68m vs $75m). I suppose the running costs might be lower, but they'd have to try very hard to compete on that front (just training the engineers on the new platform would cost $$$s). Domestic only for quite a few years.

Still sounds a bit expensive! Does it have SatNav, aircon, and electric windows?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

They're not even that cheap - the projected purchase price is only a few million £ cheaper than an Airbus (about $68m vs $75m). I suppose the running costs might be lower, but they'd have to try very hard to compete on that front (just training the engineers on the new platform would cost $$$s). Domestic only for quite a few years.

I didn't realise the price was that close. If that's the case then it has no chance with western airlines.

China will pressurise its airlines to buy it through a variety of measures (as Russia has done to prop up its aircraft manufacturers).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • The Prime Minister stated that there were three Brexit options available to the UK:   59 members have voted

    1. 1. Which of the Prime Minister's options would you choose?


      • Leave with the negotiated deal
      • Remain
      • Leave with no deal

    Please sign in or register to vote in this poll. View topic


×

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.