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Ghostly

How Soundproof Is Your House?

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I live in a modern day slavebox and the answer is not very! I can hear conversations as people walk past quite clearly, could probably join in, neighbours gates and car doors closing, the dull thud of kids playing with a football in the road, etc., etc. Kids setting off fireworks down the road last night sounded like they were directly in front of the house.

Anyone else live in a similar vintage house and how is the noise where you live? I'm in an 'estate' rather than directly on a main road.

Anyone taken any measures to attempt to reduce sound transmission from outside, e.g. triple glazing, cavity wall insulation (I assume I already have this as house is 2010), other things? Did it work? Was it expensive?

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House is about 1980. Small semi. No I don't hear the neighbours. Not much noise outside once windows are shut. My speakers aren't directly against the wall, and my neighbour has never complained I'm watching a loud film.

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Fortunately mine is the last gasp of traditional construction before timber-framing and quick-build methods came in in the 80s.

External wall insulation is the current wonder treatment, and it is good.

It insulates your house, improves its appearance, and would reduce sound coming through the walls.

I've only dealt with big programmes where the results have been very good so can't recommend somebody for individual homes.

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Sounds (no pun intended) interesting Frank, any particular product or supplier? I doubt I'd get planning permission for a cladding solution as the house is traditional brick as are the neighbouring houses.

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The last big programme we did was The Mark Group who were good for us but have since gone into administration, I think they over-reached themselves prior to the announcement about the solar subsidy cut.

There was a big range and a big range in price, with some of the largest being on external appearance. I happen to like pebble dash but that's just me. A lot of it was funded externally (ECO programme) so we ended up going for most bang for buck with a cheaper option.

I don't recall much variation in insulation effects from going cheaper, the aim was to enhance the SAP rating first and foremost, so when looking you may as well focus upon appearance.

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I don't know that older houses are necessarily that much better. Colleague of mine lived in a good sized Edwardian semi, and in her bedroom she could clearly hear her next door neighbour's heels click-click-clicking on their wooden floors.

Another colleague in a mid-1930s terrace had her husband driven to near murderous rage by noise of next door's kids - in particular a little boy who was constantly whizzing his toy cars across the floor (wooden again) and bashing them into the skirting boards.

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I don't know that older houses are necessarily that much better. Colleague of mine lived in a good sized Edwardian semi, and in her bedroom she could clearly hear her next door neighbour's heels click-click-clicking on their wooden floors.

Another colleague in a mid-1930s terrace had her husband driven to near murderous rage by noise of next door's kids - in particular a little boy who was constantly whizzing his toy cars across the floor (wooden again) and bashing them into the skirting boards.

I've lived next to Nazis too. I play them Mendelssohn. I won't give them the benefit of Wagner. :blink:

Actually it's not me playing, just a record.

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1930s semi.

Can just hear the neighbours if in adjacent rooms and they have a crying baby or talking very loudly. Only actually heard them 2 or 3 times.

I have a piano that I play further back in the house and the neighbours swear blind they can't hear it.

Am in the process of soundproofing the basement though, just in the interests of being a good neighbour..

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1930s semi.

Can just hear the neighbours if in adjacent rooms and they have a crying baby or talking very loudly. Only actually heard them 2 or 3 times.

I have a piano that I play further back in the house and the neighbours swear blind they can't hear it.

Am in the process of soundproofing the basement though, just in the interests of being a good neighbour..

Herr Fritzl? :blink:

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I live in a modern day slavebox and the answer is not very! I can hear conversations as people walk past quite clearly, could probably join in, neighbours gates and car doors closing, the dull thud of kids playing with a football in the road, etc., etc. Kids setting off fireworks down the road last night sounded like they were directly in front of the house.

Anyone else live in a similar vintage house and how is the noise where you live? I'm in an 'estate' rather than directly on a main road.

Anyone taken any measures to attempt to reduce sound transmission from outside, e.g. triple glazing, cavity wall insulation (I assume I already have this as house is 2010), other things? Did it work? Was it expensive?

Apart from house prices, noise is one of the reasons I am 'trapped' (happily) in my rental. Detached, stone-walled cottage, no near neighbours, and no passing traffic. I am always astonished at how noisy are other houses that I visit. I couldn't cope.

(I could not afford to buy what I rent. Fortunately, for the landlord, it was bought a long time ago, otherwise the yield would be a joke if bought in the last 20 years.)

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Up until 10 years ago I lived in a Japanese house (1972)

with 2mm glass with 4cm walls. It was awful.

Now I live in a council house (1952) which is unbelievably well insulated.

No one can hear you scream.

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just in the interests of being a good neighbour..

I think that is the problem with a lot of noise problems, more and more people do not consider their neighbours.

For instance, modern TVs and audio equipment have ridiculous power outputs (wattage would be adequate for a 60s club band) for a single room situation, but you don't have to have it on loud, or could you use headphones?

Doors don't have to be banged shut. Bare floor boards are an obvious nuisance for downstairs occupants etc etc.- they must know that.

Kids can be educated to act in a similarly respectable way.

What do these people do? I'm going home tonight, going to take the carpet up and walk about in boots, slam the doors all night, then watch Strictly at ear bleeding volume. Basically it's 'F**k the neighbours, it's all about me!'

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I think that is the problem with a lot of noise problems, more and more people do not consider their neighbours.

For instance, modern TVs and audio equipment have ridiculous power outputs (wattage would be adequate for a 60s club band) for a single room situation, but you don't have to have it on loud, or could you use headphones?

Indeed I have an amplifier that could fill Wembley Stadium. It doesn't get turned up loud. and I don't have a subwoofer. No complaints yet. I can't hear my neighbours, so I assume they can't hear me.

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I can hear next door having a pi$$ and can tell when they are pulling the paper off the loo roll. Down stairs I can hear when their kids come to stay and people talking/shouting in the bus stop on the school holidays.

I even have to have the radio on all the time at night because if somebody farts or sneezes it wakes me up.

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I lived in a flat once where I was privileged to hear all my neighbours bowel movements. It's much quieter where I am now.

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Indeed I have an amplifier that could fill Wembley Stadium. It doesn't get turned up loud. and I don't have a subwoofer. No complaints yet. I can't hear my neighbours, so I assume they can't hear me.

You assume. They might be suffering in silence. People don't like to complain, it leads to confrontation. I am sure you are a good neighbour nonetheless.

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Surprisingly good, given the walls are just wood and plastic. If I have music playing on the computer, I can barely hear it in the garden, even though the subwoofer shakes the floor inside the house.

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You assume. They might be suffering in silence. People don't like to complain, it leads to confrontation. I am sure you are a good neighbour nonetheless.

Just wait until they get my terrible piano playing. Honestly I can't hear their television. Some places are so flimsy that you can.

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I dream of a time when I can play the HiFi at high volume. I live in a semi and the combination of disapproval from the woman and my own guilt prevents me enjoying music anymore.

Oh for a desert island of my own!

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I dream of a time when I can play the HiFi at high volume. I live in a semi and the combination of disapproval from the woman and my own guilt prevents me enjoying music anymore.

Oh for a desert island of my own!

I enjoyed living in Aberdeenshire, where my nearest neighbours were a quarter of a mile away!

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Almost never hear my neighbours or sounds outside if windows are closed. It helps that the house is stone built, double glazed and internally insulated. Neighbours dog likes to bark a lot, but frankly it's hardly annoying. Kinda charming seeing a tiny terrier running around frantically barking at stuff no one else can see or hear.

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Almost never hear my neighbours or sounds outside if windows are closed. It helps that the house is stone built, double glazed and internally insulated. Neighbours dog likes to bark a lot, but frankly it's hardly annoying. Kinda charming seeing a tiny terrier running around frantically barking at stuff no one else can see or hear.

Sh^tdog next door barks a lot.

Someone gets up at about 5 in the morning and spends 40 minutes slamming doors and running up and down stairs. Then the front door closes and their gate clicks and it's quiet again.

Their visitors are as annoying as the being woken up early. They park on the grass verges and have trashed a huge chunk of it with tyres chewing up the grass into mud. Sometimes there's a huge 4x4 parked so far over on the grass it feels like it's in my living room.

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I can confirm the old houses/flats cam be pish as well.

The floors are a particular weakness. Also shared roof space.

I am on the top floor and I am sure I share the roof space with me neighbour. They aren't really loud - but I can hear them in my living room - so barely even venture into there these days.

Old tenement type flat - I have just realised the chimney stack between the flats is parallel to the outside wall - so no need for asolid wall between us in the roof - hence the noise. I can't even access it to put down some sound insulating roll.

There can also be issues with old places and smells coming from other flats. My downstairs neighbour smokes doobies a few days a week - clearly in his bathroom because it seeos into mine. Mingin. I now just leave my bathroom door shut and the window open. Prefer a cold bathroom and fresh air to a warm bathroom and non markets party .

I want to live in a hut half way up a mountain.

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