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Frank Hovis

I Remember When Private Roads Were Posh

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Hundreds of new homeowners are said to be living on unfinished housing developments and residents claim they are powerless when left with incomplete roads, sometimes without streetlights or pavements.

Keith Beattie moved into his new house in Haydock, Merseyside, in February 2014 but the road outside is still unfinished. He said it often floods. "If we have really bad rain the water will just pour down into the estate," he added.

He said cars have been damaged, pavements are blocked off and there are no streetlights.

"It is pitch black, you can't see anything. It is just not a safe environment," he added.

Keith and his neighbours have tried to get their developer, Bolton-based Westby Homes, to finish the work, but are still waiting: "We're powerless - what can we do as homeowners?"

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-34606633

I saw this in a small way when visiting a newish estate (last 5 years) and trying to find somewhere. There no road signs and nobody is now going to put them up. Private roads.

Private roads generally start off a bit posh, I've seen signs up saying "Private road - no through way" or "Private road - no parking" and people see it as plus (though obviously not the people in the article), but steadily erode, the drains need redoing etc. And then the residents find they are paying for it, and generally don't so you can these days recognise a private road by the state of it.

Councils will "adopt" these roads, meaning they will maintain them, but only if they are first brought up to their standard which costs a lot. Housing Associations usually have a rolling programme of using spare cash to bring roads up and get them adopted as it saves a fortune. Ordinary homeowners don't do this, imagine getting everybody in the street to fork out 10k - they won't.

For me a private road is like a rent a roof solar panels, an attached lay rector liability, or a listed building. I won't touch it. I gently advised somebody buying somewhere with rent a roof that it would be a problem and she should look elsewhere. After a nightmare time of the lease not being registered, the company that installed them having gone bust etc. she eventually did look elsehwere but it cost a lot in the meantime.

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They are always full of potholes, because the "owners" won't open their wallet. Well you have got your "privacy" as nobody without a tracked vehicle or a donkey can get up there! Maybe jesus will visit you, but I think not!

Oh
I am well with you on these rent-a-roof schemes! :wacko:

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No streelights, awwww...

Nobody even seems to know who owns the bumpy potholed track leading to this place (probably because if they admitted it they might have to maintain it).

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Private roads generally start off a bit posh, I've seen signs up saying "Private road - no through way" or "Private road - no parking" and people see it as plus (though obviously not the people in the article), but steadily erode, the drains need redoing etc. And then the residents find they are paying for it, and generally don't so you can these days recognise a private road by the state of it.

Councils will "adopt" these roads, meaning they will maintain them, but only if they are first brought up to their standard which costs a lot. Housing Associations usually have a rolling programme of using spare cash to bring roads up and get them adopted as it saves a fortune. Ordinary homeowners don't do this, imagine getting everybody in the street to fork out 10k - they won't.

I think what's happening here is the developers are meant to finish the project with the roads in a condition suitable for adoption but are not doing this, they're simply offloading the houses with a promise that the road will be brought up to standard then ignoring this and hoping that 100+ separate homeowners won't be able to organise themselves and take legal action to enforce the duty.

I believe that the solicitors retain a proportion of the sale proceeds until the adoption of the road, presumably the cost of adoption exceeds the total of all these retentions and the developers are making a business decision to screw over their customers.

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100+ separate homeowners won't be able to organise themselves and take legal action to enforce the duty.

What do the 100+ worth of solicitors fees achieve when they buy the house?

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We have quite a few very expensive private roads around Nottingham and the prices of the houses can run into millions. My own (rather snobbish opinion) of these Mc Mansion type roads is why the heck did they choose this urban format when they could have bought something secluded and historic in the country for the same money.

A private drive Mc Mansion with no grounds in Nottingham

http://www.rightmove.co.uk/property-for-sale/property-25981137.html

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We have quite a few very expensive private roads around Nottingham and the prices of the houses can run into millions. My own (rather snobbish opinion) of these Mc Mansion type roads is why the heck did they choose this urban format when they could have bought something secluded and historic in the country for the same money.

A private drive Mc Mansion with no grounds in Nottingham

http://www.rightmove.co.uk/property-for-sale/property-25981137.html

Thank you for just another example of how ******ed the market is. 1.25 million pounds to live on a roundabout.

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Thank you for just another example of how ******ed the market is. 1.25 million pounds to live on a roundabout.

Nice house:

5963_200049427_IMG_00_0003_max_620x414.J

Um, can I revise my opinion?

5963_200049427_IMG_01_0002_max_620x414.J

:lol:

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What do the 100+ worth of solicitors fees achieve when they buy the house?

Hopefully any half decent conveyancer would highlight the pitfalls but by the time they get to the legal stage a "minor" issue like this isn't going to derail the process.

Having read about it a bit more I think there's 2 different things going on. You have people who bought 30 years ago when the road was in good condition who didn't factor in the decay over time and you have people who've bought off plan or on incomplete estates who've been stitched up by the developers.

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Hopefully any half decent conveyancer would highlight the pitfalls but by the time they get to the legal stage a "minor" issue like this isn't going to derail the process.

Having read about it a bit more I think there's 2 different things going on. You have people who bought 30 years ago when the road was in good condition who didn't factor in the decay over time and you have people who've bought off plan or on incomplete estates who've been stitched up by the developers.

I do know of one private road in the SE where there is a residents association, they levy fees each year to build up a pot, and so keep the road in good order. Must be increasingly rare though.

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I remember when homes were built on roads that led somewhere.....not on an estate, a cul de sac...a group of homes with only one way in, one way out...a dead end.

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I remember when homes were built on roads that led somewhere.....not on an estate, a cul de sac...a group of homes with only one way in, one way out...a dead end.

Roads that lead somewhere means roads with traffic. I'd rather be on a cul de sac in an estate than on a main road. Less noise, safer for children, fewer people walking past your windows, etc etc etc

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Roads that lead somewhere means roads with traffic. I'd rather be on a cul de sac in an estate than on a main road. Less noise, safer for children, fewer people walking past your windows, etc etc etc

Depends how busy the road or how big the front garden is.....all I know it is nice that one way will take you one place and the other way will take you to a completely different place. Only my opinion.....estates tend to feel claustrophobic, narrow streets and squashed in.

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I do know of one private road in the SE where there is a residents association, they levy fees each year to build up a pot, and so keep the road in good order. Must be increasingly rare though.

The problem with that is freeloading, if my neighbours pay to maintain the road but I don't I still get the benefit of the road without the cost.

If the road was always intended to be private then it's presumably easy to get the legals right and compel people to contribute, the problem is that lots of them are "accidental".

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Roads that lead somewhere means roads with traffic. I'd rather be on a cul de sac in an estate than on a main road. Less noise, safer for children, fewer people walking past your windows, etc etc etc

But then everyone who lives there will use a car for all of their activities, negatively impacting those who don't live in such places.

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I do know of one private road in the SE where there is a residents association, they levy fees each year to build up a pot, and so keep the road in good order. Must be increasingly rare though.

I lived on a private road, and the landlady refused to pay into the kitty to repair it. That's probably why one of the neighbours reported her car as abandoned one day, and it almost got towed away.

Actually, I lived on another private road, but the landlord didn't have much choice there, because they were the only house on the road. If they wanted it fixed, they had to pay.

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Thank you for just another example of how ******ed the market is. 1.25 million pounds to live on a roundabout.

£1.25 million and there's no room for all that gym equipment so it's plonked right next to the swimming pool. I'd rather have a gym membership, if of course I was that way inclined.

The whole layout looks cramped to me, almost as if the original plot was sold with outline planning permission for a dormer bungalow with the view to extend and expand into the monstrosity that it has become.

Lovely farm near to me for sale at £895,00 with small holding - completely secluded, you could buy that raze the building to the ground and build your mcmansion without having to resort to high hedges and common trellis/panels.

Some people.

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Depends how busy the road or how big the front garden is.....all I know it is nice that one way will take you one place and the other way will take you to a completely different place. Only my opinion.....estates tend to feel claustrophobic, narrow streets and squashed in.

I agree with that, and the lack of through roads plays a big part of that. Through roads don't have to be main roads, but the lack of them I think strongly adds to the "bunch of houses plonked on a space" feel instead of an organic part of whatever place they're part of. Whatever else their faults large areas of Victorian housing don't have that issue. There are plenty of other factors though.

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Another set of private roads I am familiar with are around the Sutton Coldfield area, the Four Oaks Estates. Again private modern estates with prices up to the 4 million pound mark for McMansions. Homes of preference for the new money in our Health Service. I do know a doctor that bought one.

https://www.google.co.uk/?gws_rd=ssl#q=four+oaks+estate+is+a+private+road

And what you get for three million quid.

http://www.rightmove.co.uk/property-for-sale/find.html?searchType=SALE&locationIdentifier=REGION%5E1298&insId=4&radius=0.0&minPrice=&maxPrice=&minBedrooms=&maxBedrooms=&displayPropertyType=&maxDaysSinceAdded=&_includeSSTC=on&sortByPriceDescending=&primaryDisplayPropertyType=&secondaryDisplayPropertyType=&oldDisplayPropertyType=&oldPrimaryDisplayPropertyType=&newHome=&auction=false

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My Mum lives on a private road that is little more than a cart track but it is in rural village and has been in the same state for over 50 years. People who demand tarmac in such areas always reveal themselves as nouveau parvenus.

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My Mum lives on a private road that is little more than a cart track but it is in rural village and has been in the same state for over 50 years. People who demand tarmac in such areas always reveal themselves as nouveau parvenus.

Why spoil it? As long as the horse and gippo caravan can make it up there. -_- Does she sell pegs and heather?

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The OP is not really a 'private road' though. Isn't it talking about roads on new estates not being finished until all the building is complete, which is standard practice? Presumably in these cases all of the planned building didn't happen.

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The problem with that is freeloading, if my neighbours pay to maintain the road but I don't I still get the benefit of the road without the cost.

If the road was always intended to be private then it's presumably easy to get the legals right and compel people to contribute, the problem is that lots of them are "accidental".

We live in a close that a small minority of the residents want to privatise, with gates. It's never going to happen, since all the residents would have to agree, and cough up far more than they do already for general maintenance - some of them will never pay the current relatively small amount anyway - but they keep banging on about it. They think it will increase values and security, and at least one of them only wants it because she thinks it's sw*anky. (She is a nightmare of a woman anyway.) Personally I think gated roads naff and pretentious, and more likely to encourage burglars than the reverse.

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