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workingpoor

Driving And Physical Degeneration.

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Is there a point (in age) where human physical health and capabilities can be definitivley said to have declined to a level which would prevent safe and competent control of a motor vehicle?

For example say 90+ years of age?

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Basically, if you can see reasonably well and work the controls, a doctor says you can drive! At 90 years I might give up driving and stick to the motorbike! :( Some people aren't fit to drive at 22 and don't get better.

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Basically, if you can see reasonably well and work the controls, a doctor says you can drive! At 90 years I might give up driving and stick to the motorbike! :( Some people aren't fit to drive at 22 and don't get better.

Not true. If you can complete the form every three years to renew the licence from age 70 then you can drive pretty much to any age.

You are supposed to declare any conditions to DVLA which may impede your ability though...

http://informationnow.org.uk/articles/284/driving-as-you-get-older

Frightening as to why we don't see more accidents like the one in Guildford today.

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Based on my experience with elderly relatives, I think mental capacity might be more of an issue than physical capacity. Modern cars with their power steering and reversing cameras seem physically pretty easy to drive to me. Mentally coping with fast-moving dense traffic, particularly in an unfamiliar area, can be a mental challenge for the best of us.

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You are supposed to declare any conditions to DVLA which may impede your ability though...

"Supposed" being the operative word.

This from a few days ago:

Man with sleep disorder who killed cyclist 'shouldn't have been on road'

A man with a sleep disorder who knocked over a cyclist causing him fatal injuries had been warned by a medic the day before that he should not drive, a court has heard.

...

He saw a specialist at the sleep clinic at Hexham general hospital on 8 August 2014, the day before the crash, and she told him he should not drive, the court heard.

He was also handed a DVLA leaflet called Tiredness Can Kill Advice for Drivers, Richard Bennett, prosecuting, said.

But Urwin chose to head out the next day in his new Ford Fiesta to go fishing in Rothbury. On his way back that afternoon, while driving at 50-55mph on a straight section of the A6079, he hit the back of Charltons bike, sending him on to the bonnet and over the back of the car.

He was flown to the Royal Victoria infirmary in Newcastle but died, having suffered catastrophic brain injuries, Bennett said.

[more...]

http://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2015/oct/19/neil-urwin-sleep-disorder-cyclist-andrew-charlton

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My old man, is mentally quick and fit but is now suffering with MD. I explained as tackfully (as I could last year), that if he has an accident and it is shown his eye sight wasn't up to it, he could find himself uninsured and facing a trial.

Fortunately he doesn't go very far, once a week and now he recently tells me he is going to give up driving next year.

I don't know how bad his sight is, but it must be bad for him to consider it, as it is a big thing taking his independnace away from him. Fortunately he has come to the right conclusion in his own time.

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I had a lorry driver working for me who was in his late seventies he didn't hang about either,

Smashing! :blink:

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Some elderly drivers are a hazzard to other road users, becoming more of a problem because the thought of them giving up their car is like a bereavement, another loss....there is a process if you are worried that they could be a danger to themselves or others.

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Yes AMD age related macular degeneration was one of the examples i was thinking of:

For reasons that are unclear, AMD tends to be more common in women than men. It's also more common in white and Chinese people.

The condition is most common in people over the age of 50. It's estimated 1 in every 10 people over 65 have some degree of AMD.

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Is there a point (in age) where human physical health and capabilities can be definitivley said to have declined to a level which would prevent safe and competent control of a motor vehicle?

For example say 90+ years of age?

Perhaps surprisingly, there is very little evidence that people become more dangerous on the road as they become older. Now, they might have some impairment in their abilities, but nearly everyone automatically self-polices, and as they get older become much more risk averse, slow down and drive less (particularly at night). Eventually, the nearly everyone stops driving on their own when they regard themselves as being a risk. But funnily enough, the particular age that an individual decides that they should stop driving depends on the individual and their own particular health issues, and there isn't an age line around which everyone starts stopping...

Now you might argue that that isn't good enough, and that we should intervene much more aggressively - but the evidence just isn't there. Older people aren't more dangerous on the roads (even if they might be annoying for you when they're driving what you regards as too slow for the conditions*)

Now, the 'nearly everyone' quoted a couple of times in the above might be quite important, but it really is a small effect compared with, say, 'nearly everyone' who is 17-25 drives with caution, or 'nearly everyone' aged 35-55 obeys the speed limits.

*the problem being the truism that everyone who drives more slowly than me is over cautious, and everyone who drives more quickly is a fool...

[Now, if you've got an elderly relative who is, in your opinion, not up to driving, then have a conversation with them about it. Don't say they can't drive, but have a chat about they feel about driving, and see what they say]

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Some elderly drivers are a hazzard to other road users, becoming more of a problem because the thought of them giving up their car is like a bereavement, another loss....there is a process if you are worried that they could be a danger to themselves or others.

Sadly winks, there isn't much of a process for getting rid of 20-year olds who are a danger to themseves and others...

XYY

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Sadly winks, there isn't much of a process for getting rid of 20-year olds who are a danger to themseves and others...

XYY

Some of them get rid of themselves.

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I had a lorry driver working for me who was in his late seventies he didn't hang about either,

Wagon drivers from age 65 have to have an annual medical unless they have changed the rules...

Medical is quite strict as well.....

From age 45 it is every 5 years.

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Wagon drivers from age 65 have to have an annual medical unless they have changed the rules...

Medical is quite strict as well.....

From age 45 it is every 5 years.

Yes, until they fail it, and if they still need to work they go driving 7.5 ton lorries.

Apart from the eyesight test there's nothing too strenuous in the medical. GPs like them as cash in hand work my last one was done by an Eastern European doctor who comes round the industrial estate doing them cheap.

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I had a lorry driver working for me who was in his late seventies he didn't hang about either,

I had a 73 year old bus driver on my route today. He's so slow that I feel sorry for any passenger unlucky enough to board his bus; but we can't force him to retire any more.

He seems sharp enough when you talk to him, so I suspect he's always been a useless driver, rather than slowing down with age. Wish the old git would take his carriage clock and **** off though.

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My grandad (93) can only use one leg and cant turn his neck, still drives OK though.

He's quite a character. Obese, 6ft4, must weigh over 20 stone, smokes like a chimney, mind sharp as anything, somehow still alive.

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Yes AMD age related macular degeneration was one of the examples i was thinking of:

For reasons that are unclear, AMD tends to be more common in women than men. It's also more common in white and Chinese people.

The condition is most common in people over the age of 50. It's estimated 1 in every 10 people over 65 have some degree of AMD.

RAAACIST. Don't you know that there are no differences between the races. And no such thing as race anyway.

Yours, in honour of all the SJWs who missed your post

Wherebee

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Many older folks do stop driving. My dad (who is of the generation that got early retirement) gave up nearly 30 years ago, though even now he'd probably be considered perfectly capable by TPTB.

Others go on driving. Some of them long after they should stop for everyone's safety. That's why free bus passes are the most sensible of the various pensioner benefits.

And of course, you don't have to be a pensioner to be too far gone to drive. Medical conditions happen to a sizeable minority of younger folks.

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This accident in Guilford and the accident in Scotland involving a passed out dustbin lorry driver make me think how easy we give out licences to use what is s very dangerous piece of equipment.

I think we should increase the standard for the initial test, and do regular retest (probably not a very popular idea)

I'm also surprised at how blasé people are about the number of road deaths / serious injuries. If these people were dying in industrial accident's or terrorist attacks we would be screaming from the roof tops "something needs to be fine"

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The roads have been getting safer! I still drive, and I am an old fart!

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Sadly winks, there isn't much of a process for getting rid of 20-year olds who are a danger to themseves and others...

XYY

Driving into a wall at 80 mph seems to work around me at the mo.

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The majority of accidents round me are blokes under 25 and OAPs over 75.

How in fcksake the insurance industry can justify charging a 20 yo ~2k for 3rd party yet sell policies to over 75 for a couple of 100.

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