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Landlord Tory Mp Philip Davies Says Law Requiring Homes Be Fit For Human Habitation Is An Unnecessary Burden

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there is a general tendency for government to increase the size of the statute book

I don't like that direction of travel

not just for landlords, but for the world at large

that said, providing housing for people is a serious undertaking and should only be undertaken by those prepared to take it seriously

if updated legislation is required to make that happen (I doubt that it is, but if it is), then bring it on

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I agree why should anyone expect a house to be fit for human habitation to rent. What an unrealistic expectation renters have. They should appreciate being able to rent a building unfit for human habitation and be grateful that the slumlord allows them to rent a sh1th0le. And if the tenant complains they should be evicted for being so ungrateful.

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Yes private landlord shouldn't be put through the burden of additional legislation. Obviously it must be a burden to the big car manufacturers to produce cars where the wheels don't fall off, and are fit and safe to drive. But lets face it. The vast majority of buy to let landlords are fly by night 'mom and pop' rentiers and not proper business people. No one should be forced to entrust a roof over their head to these guys.

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No more interfering legislation please.

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Just make anything that is rented or newly built has to meet or exceed the passivhaus standards with a minimum square meter per person and be done with it.

Edited by Squeeky

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Just make anything that is rented or newly build has to meet or exceed the passivhaus standards with a minimum square meter per person and be done with it.

having been in four 'passivhaus' houses in recent times, no thanks!

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Just make anything that is rented or newly build has to meet or exceed the passivhaus standards with a minimum square meter per person and be done with it.

That sounds sensible to me but you can't have anything that sensible or 'workarounds' won't be able to be found by 'clever' people. Maybe just change minimum square meter per person to minimum square meter per bedroom. So 1 bed home is minimum X m^2, 2 bed Y m^2 etc.

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I agree why should anyone expect a house to be fit for human habitation to rent. What an unrealistic expectation renters have. They should appreciate being able to rent a building unfit for human habitation and be grateful that the slumlord allows them to rent a sh1th0le. And if the tenant complains they should be evicted for being so ungrateful.

Precisely, property only exists to make money for landlords after all - who cares about the plebs who pay the rent?

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the ones I have been in felt 'stuffy'

almost as if the air was 'stale'

that is the best way I can describe it

I'd rather pay for a bit more gas and coal tbh

suppose it depends what you are used to - if the Everest man dropped his feather near our windows it would blow so far away he might never find it again!

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the ones I have been in felt 'stuffy'

almost as if the air was 'stale'

that is the best way I can describe it

I'd rather pay for a bit more gas and coal tbh

...

Thanks. That's interesting and something to be wary of. Wondering if the ventilation systems were not working or poorly designed... I'm not looking to be passivhaus standard so will for example have windows that can be opened but they'll be triple glazed. I'm also only looking for near airtight as I'd like a small fireplace for example.

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Thanks. That's interesting and something to be wary of. Wondering if the ventilation systems were not working or poorly designed... I'm not looking to be passivhaus standard so will for example have windows that can be opened but they'll be triple glazed. I'm also only looking for near airtight as I'd like a small fireplace for example.

I have been in houses that are built to very high specification in terms of insulation, but not up to passivhaus standards - with open fireplaces, opening windows, trickle vents etc.

Someone in our village replaced a 1950s built house with a 2013 build (to above required spec but nowhere near passivhaus) that is 149% the volume of the house it replaced

His heating oil bill for 2014 was 31% of his heating oil bill for 2012... so it does make a massive difference to consider such things properly in a build

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Thanks. That's interesting and something to be wary of. Wondering if the ventilation systems were not working or poorly designed... I'm not looking to be passivhaus standard so will for example have windows that can be opened but they'll be triple glazed. I'm also only looking for near airtight as I'd like a small fireplace for example.

With passivhaus the ventilation system has to be, somewhat ironically, mechanical rather than passive. There's a good OP on AECB about the possible issues with this here. Interior air quality can be an issue. Also any house that can be adequately heated during winter just through body heat, cooking, lighting and watching TV can be overheated by the same during summer (warning: Daily Mail). On the other hand it's obviously well worth trying to cut down on energy use.

Edited by Neverwhere

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With passivhaus the ventilation system has to be, somewhat ironically, mechanical rather than passive. There's a good OP on AECB about the possible issues with this here. Interior air quality can be an issue. Also any house that can be adequately heated during winter just through body heat, cooking, lighting and watching TV can be overheated by the same during summer (warning: Daily Mail). On the other hand it's obviously well worth trying to cut down on energy use.

I have a book on Passiv house technology. Its interesting. Heat pumps, super doper insulation.

However it does from a nation that does not eat curries, where you need a window for the cooking and the after effects.

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I have a book on Passiv house technology. Its interesting. Heat pumps, super doper insulation.

However it does from a nation that does not eat curries, where you need a window for the cooking and the after effects.

:lol:

I'm sure it is interesting. I personally dislike the idea of living in a property where the air quality is reliant on a mechanical device that needs perpetual maintenance and cleaning, but each to their own. I'm pretty certain there are other ways to design in energy efficiency with passive ventilation instead.

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there is a general tendency for government to increase the size of the statute book

I don't like that direction of travel

not just for landlords, but for the world at large

that said, providing housing for people is a serious undertaking and should only be undertaken by those prepared to take it seriously

if updated legislation is required to make that happen (I doubt that it is, but if it is), then bring it on

What's the alternative? Do nothing or have overly wide-ranging laws, the former maintains the status quo and the latter has unintended consequences (look at the abuse of the RIP Act).

Oh and all this law won't really increase the size of the statute book much as all it'll do is allow a C. 19th act of parliament to keep track with increases in rental costs.

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What's the alternative? Do nothing or have overly wide-ranging laws, the former maintains the status quo and the latter has unintended consequences (look at the abuse of the RIP Act).

Oh and all this law won't really increase the size of the statute book much as all it'll do is allow a C. 19th act of parliament to keep track with increases in rental costs.

as I said in the post you quoted

if updated legislation is required to make that happen (I doubt that it is, but if it is), then bring it on

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Thanks. That's interesting and something to be wary of. Wondering if the ventilation systems were not working or poorly designed... I'm not looking to be passivhaus standard so will for example have windows that can be opened but they'll be triple glazed. I'm also only looking for near airtight as I'd like a small fireplace for example.

I don't think I'm going to overdo it with such things, if I ever get opportunity to buy. My last rental had two double-glazed opening window in the bedroom, but on one the hinge/friction-stays had become misaligned and it didn't shut flush. Let quite a big gap at the upper part. It never got repaired. Didn't look easy to replace because whoever fitted it riveted it all in. Was warm enough with insulated curtains. Besides I like a bit of ventilation. I've not costed up any triple glazing (for the future). I do think about the costs, the actual benefits, and then possible future replacement costs. If windows do lose heat I'll try and find ghetto-mod cheap solutions; perhaps shutters. Fine with me if landlords are required to install minimum standard of modern double-glazing by regulation.

By Jeff Howell 4:33PM BST 27 Oct 2010

LIGHT FANTASTIC

Question: [..]Conservatory [..]This kind of roof is needed to give sufficient light to the room but I’m concerned we will lose a lot of heat through it during the winter.

Answer: [..]Any material that allows the passage of light also allows the passage of heat. The latest high-performance sealed glazed units (solar glass outer pane, argon filling, heat-reflective inner pane) have a thermal insulation value around one third that of an insulated roof and cost from £12 to £16 per square metre.

Compared with the existing polycarbonate sheet, they might save enough energy to pay for themselves in 10 years or so. Although my sources tell me that the argon gas filling will have leaked out long before that and you will have no way of telling that it has gone. And of course unless the glazing is installed according to British Standard 6262, in drained, vented rebates, then the units will also have misted up internally before reaching the payback date.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/lifestyle/interiors/jeffhowell/8090353/Home-improvements-polycarbonate-roofs.html

Edited by Venger

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I am inclined to agree Philip Davies if you don't like the house don't rent it. And if it is a small thing you don't like see about fixing it your self and stop being a perpetual complainer.

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It's not that simple when they have gained possession of so much rental stock.

That's what many of the affected BTLers on forums are claiming. They won't have money to make repairs. I don't want a situation where tenants have to choose from evermore slummy rentals. Then again, some think they can just move back with their parents. :rolleyes:

Then there's all the talk that landlords/BTLers

will stop making repairs or maintaining property,

and that their tenants will be affected, because

of the tax-relief changes leaving landlords with

less money. BTLers coming out with all this have

no place being be landlords to tenants.

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I am inclined to agree Philip Davies if you don't like the house don't rent it. And if it is a small thing you don't like see about fixing it your self and stop being a perpetual complainer.

Not worth rising to this.

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Not worth rising to this.

Seeing as I have never rented I may not Know what I am talking about.

However my central heating isn't working and I had to go through last winter without it as well. I am seriously thinking of sacking my self for my poor property maintenance.

I reckon if I spent two hours tomorrow I could get the central heating running but I have been thinking that for 18 months. Great when everything is someone else's fault not so great when it's your own fault and you have to fix it.

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