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Nhs Loses £1Bn In 3 Months

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NHS faces its biggest financial crisis in a generation after losing

£1 billion in just three months

NHS trusts in England create deficit of almost £1bn in first three months of the financial year - the "worst" financial position "in a generation", two regulators say

Nothing like a crisis to bring on privatisation? Compared to the money thrown at the bankers it's not really a lot of money, however the NHS needs a shake up to make it work better but I doubt the Tories or Labour can deliver on what's needed. The Tories certainly don't want an efficient government run health service as it makes a mockery of the claim private is best and Labour couldn't organised a p155 up in a brewery.

I wonder how much immigration strains the service with the numbers constantly under-estimated causing bigger problems?

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We just cant carry on being a free service for anyone in the world that manages to get into the UK, our leaders will never point the blame at this but the fact is there are just too many people now in the UK and our services are at breaking point.

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A minor anecdote for your amusement...

My wife is a CAPD nurse, and helps run a small CAPD clinic. The other week, the clinic was cancelled for the whole day at short notice, the reason being that there was a hospital inspection, and the clinic would lose them points as there was nowhere sufficiently secure to store patient notes.

And, yes, the whole service is slowly disintegrating - the more experienced staff are leaving in droves, which seems to please the management as they can replace them with lower-grade novices. Meanwhile, check-boxes, targets and mission-statements are the order of the day.

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"losing"?

Ahh...."toryraph". If only they "worked as hard as the Chinese" etc etc

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Have they checked down the back of the sofa?

Sure interestarateripoff could find it for them.

And that is a pretty poor effort. Deutsche Bank managed to lose 6 times that amount in the same period.

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A minor anecdote for your amusement...

My wife is a CAPD nurse, and helps run a small CAPD clinic. The other week, the clinic was cancelled for the whole day at short notice, the reason being that there was a hospital inspection, and the clinic would lose them points as there was nowhere sufficiently secure to store patient notes.

And, yes, the whole service is slowly disintegrating - the more experienced staff are leaving in droves, which seems to please the management as they can replace them with lower-grade novices. Meanwhile, check-boxes, targets and mission-statements are the order of the day.

dont worry, Im starting in November.

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Have they checked down the back of the sofa?

Sure interestarateripoff could find it for them.

And that is a pretty poor effort. Deutsche Bank managed to lose 6 times that amount in the same period.

That's German efficiency for you.

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I did a stint of admin in the NHS last year and the whole thing is a mess. One of the biggest problems is that there aren't enough admin staff and, surprisingly enough, managers. There's a vicious cycle of lack of admin staff leading to crises that the managers need to sort out which doesn't give them time to write business plans so they can get more permanent admin staff but they can have temp staff which cost a fortune and can bugger off with no notice. Then you have consultants, registrars, nurses, physiotherapists etc on 30-100k a year doing some of their own admin when it would be much more cost effective for them to be seeing patients and have someone on 15k a year doing the admin but the public don't like the idea of NHS money going on admin staff and managers so the medical staff budget is increased while the admin staff budget is decreased. So you get one admin person trying to do the job of 2-3 people meaning that loads of appointments go to waste and waiting lists get longer.

Ideally when you are booking appointments you should phone to check if the patient can make the time and date, but there's no time for that so letters just get sent out instead (these need to go out even if you've confirmed on the phone). If the letter doesn't turn up then that's an appointment wasted. Then you get people calling up to cancel appointments at short notice. It can sometimes take hours to fill a last minute appointment because a lot of people don't answer their phone to private numbers or they're at work during working hours etc. Then you do get people on the phone but they can't make that one appointment you have to offer but actually they're months down the waiting list and you have to explain to them that everyone is doing the best that they can but unless they can suddenly come to the appointment tomorrow there's nothing you can do for them except call them back the next time you have a last minute cancellation (this conversation can take upwards of ten minutes, my worst was about half an hour). Sometimes you get shouted at which is fun.

The pay and conditions are crap so anyone who's any good leaves if they don't get promoted first. Not to mention the fact that staff are in contact with sick people (sometimes from the other side of the country) so are constantly being exposed to new viruses. This means that the whole office is coughing and sneezing the whole time and people are off sick a lot (I had to leave because my crappy lungs couldn't cope with the constant onslaught).

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I can see all this bad press slowly being dripfed to the media is a path to part pay, part paid for health service......common sense says that new expensive medicines, new medical procedures, more people to service and a growing number of older people and people with mental health problems.....IT IS UNSUSTAINABLE.

It is too big and uncoordinated.... departments do not work together or talk to each other, and the waste is all around easy for anyone to see...... there are pockets of the best care and treatment you can get anywhere in the world, the people who work want to do their best and many of them do, the rest the monster of the system make things hard for them to work at their best potential....elderly so called bed blockers have to block the beds because sufficient outside support systems are not there...there is no smooth and easy transfer to longer term elderly care ....rant over, only hope the NHS will not die.

Edited by winkie

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"losing"?

Ahh...."toryraph". If only they "worked as hard as the Chinese" etc etc

Yeah its not losing money, all it means is they've miscalculated the budget.

Well duh, the NHS costs money, but it is the only worthwhile thing this nation has left.

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friend of mine works for a trust.

was told two years ago they'd spent next two years budgets already.

it seems the magic money tree never runs dry.

what I'd like to know how much of this spending goes on the public and how much in massive salaries, of supposed public servants, how much goes on people who contribute nothing to the tax pot and how much goes on care for actual tax payers.

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As I understand it, this is a culmination of issues:

1. Lack of staffing. The Care Quality Commission has recently updated guidance about minimum levels of staffing, which are substantially higher than had been normal practice. As a result, there has been a large rush to hire new staff, which often means agencies. As a result the agency staff bill has rocketed.

2. Exhaustion of easy efficiency savings. Individual NHS trusts are paid under a system called "payment by results". For each patient seen, diagnosed or treated, there is a fee tariff. So, for example there is a specific price for "pneumonia - mild severity". So, if someone pitches up at A&E, gets diagnosed with mild pneumonia, spends a couple of days in hospital having antibiotics, and gets discharged, there hospital trust will be able to raise an invoice for the specified tariff. Similarly, there are specific tariffs for clinic attendances, elective surgery, etc. However, the tariffs have been fixed for some time. They were last revised 5 years ago, and have been frozen (nominally) since then. The idea is that this would be a year on year cut, which would stimulate efficiency savings. The efficiency savings have been built into the tariff for about 10 years now, and all the obvious savings have already been made; finding scope for more savings is getting very hard.

3. Prior poorly planned spending. Towards the end of GB's reign, the NHS got some big cash injections for capital equipment which was termed "new initiative funding". The idea is that hospitals could buy new capital plant, e.g. an MRI scanner or something similar. As a result, there was a large expansion in equipment. Equipment doesn't last forever, and it is now reaching the end of its working life or the vendor is wanting to discontinue support/parts availability, and this equipment needs replacing. However, the PBR funding stream is supposed to include that. This has resulted in increased cost pressures recently.

Where I work, we are running a small deficit, but had forecasted at the beginning of the financial year to run a substantial surplus. However, we have had staffing issues - a large number of consultants have gone off long term. More importantly, these particular consultants were the ones which liked to do lots of additional work. The trust had worked out that if they ran extra Saturday/Sunday treatments/clinics, then the income via PBR would result in a nice profit compared to cost of staffing the extra clinics. However, with the consults not available, the additional work couldn't be done, the payments dried up, and on top of that there was a huge bill for locum consultants.

There have also been some unexpected capital costs - for example, a faulty electrical "transfer" switch damaged both the hospital's backup generator and the critical area UPS system. When the electricians came in to fix it, they took one look at the whole electrical installation and basically condemned it, saying it wasn't fit for purpose, and that it had been inappropriately designed and built. The cost of rewiring the entire hospital, installing the now recommended dual-redundant UPS and dual-redundant generators, and asking the electricity supplier to provide dual-redundant electrical supplies (which involved them having to build a new 33 kV substation), was astronomical.

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When the electricians came in to fix it, they took one look at the whole electrical installation and basically condemned it, saying it wasn't fit for purpose, and that it had been inappropriately designed and built.

That's the much beloved "gosh cor blimey who did that jerry built" syndrome whenever a new builder, electrician, plumber etc arrives on the scene. I guess the NHS will be particularly prone to it.

Edited by billybong

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That's the much beloved "gosh cor blimey who did that jerry built" syndrome whenever a new builder, electrician, plumber etc arrives on the scene. I guess the NHS will be particularly prone to it.

Or the regs that change every few years. The EU harmonisation of cable colours that has resulted in mixed cable colour installs all over this country and still left the rest of europe with their shitting two pin piss pot excuses for trailing plugs, a wholly shite dangerous design.

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Or the regs that change every few years. The EU harmonisation of cable colours that has resulted in mixed cable colour installs all over this country and still left the rest of europe with their shitting two pin piss pot excuses for trailing plugs, a wholly shite dangerous design.

You should see the sockets in the Philippines. ..

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...loses £1 billion in 3 months.....where has that money gone?..... Bureaucracy, red tape and the massive growth in blame claim culture means things will and does get ever more costly....all being fed back into the economy creating more jobs and non essential work, paying for peoples higher cost of living, growing mortgages and debts......so it goes on.

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