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Guest eight

A Legal (And Somewhat Moral) Conundrum

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Guest eight

It would appear that Mrs. Eight is getting undercharged on her mobile phone contract by a significant amount and on a continuous basis. Is she under any obligation to inform her service provider of their mistake?

It's Virgin BTW so no qualms about beardyman having to make do with two hookers instead of three tonight.

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It would appear that Mrs. Eight is getting undercharged on her mobile phone contract by a significant amount and on a continuous basis. Is she under any obligation to inform her service provider of their mistake?

It's Virgin BTW so no qualms about beardyman having to make do with two hookers instead of three tonight.

Let me put it to you this way as a former debt adviser, when they realise their mistake they will have no hesitation in pursuing the outstanding balance, whatever that might be by that time.

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No obligation but if and when they discover the msitake they can retrospectively bill you for it.

So you can:

Hang on in there and hope that they don't

If it's as significant amount as you say it may be worth trying to "bank" the savings to date by closing it saying you've already signed up for a new one which means they won't look too closely at it. If you sya you're thinking of leaving they will review it which may trigger a "Hang on!" inquiry.

Many years ago I left an employer and they paid out twice to me on one of their savings schemes that closed on my leaving. As part of my gripe was that their HR admin was such a nightmare when I was trying to recruit / give payrises to staff I put that down to karma.

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Guest eight

Let me put it to you this way as a former debt adviser, when they realise their mistake they will have no hesitation in pursuing the outstanding balance, whatever that might be by that time.

That may be true, but it's legally interesting. There's no written contract as far as I am aware, so you could argue that the billed amount represents the implied contract terms - especially as it's been going on for a prolonged period.

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That may be true, but it's legally interesting. There's no written contract as far as I am aware, so you could argue that the billed amount represents the implied contract terms - especially as it's been going on for a prolonged period.

Have fun with that

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Let me put it to you this way as a former debt adviser, when they realise their mistake they will have no hesitation in pursuing the outstanding balance, whatever that might be by that time.

OT in OT but could you provide some housing anecdotal's from your former role?

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Guest eight

Have fun with that

It's also slightly galling to think that she may be making them aware - for no reward - of a systemic error that could be costing them many thousands of pounds. I think she should tell them, then invoice them a hefty consultancy fee. :lol:

Frank Hovis, it was actually some jiggery pokery by the retentions team that led to this situation arising in the first place.

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It's also slightly galling to think that she may be making them aware - for no reward - of a systemic error that could be costing them many thousands of pounds. I think she should tell them, then invoice them a hefty consultancy fee. :lol:

Frank Hovis, it was actually some jiggery pokery by the retentions team that led to this situation arising in the first place.

I am aware of someone sitting on a similar situation with T-mobile/EE. Except they haven't charged that person, who is on PAYG, for their internet use (£20 every 6 months) for 2 years and, as far as I know, they still have £8 of the initial £10 PAYG left. They only use the smartphone for internet preferring an old, smaller phone, whose battery lasts 7 days, for all their calls.

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It's also slightly galling to think that she may be making them aware - for no reward - of a systemic error that could be costing them many thousands of pounds. I think she should tell them, then invoice them a hefty consultancy fee. :lol:

Frank Hovis, it was actually some jiggery pokery by the retentions team that led to this situation arising in the first place.

To be honest,. my experience is that dealing with anything beyond the 3 or 4 regular issues with any phone-based support is nigh on impossible.

I have a PAYG phone. I gave up trying to register on the interweb. I wanted to know how data I have. I can text and get a top value but that is useless.

The worst experience I have had is being a good citizen and trying to ring Virgin to tell that that front of one of their roadside boxes had fallen - not kicked off, fallen off as they are sh1t. 2 hours of bemused Indians who could not give a fck.

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Reminds me of an older guy I met whilst on honeymoon in Antigua who had a mobile phone that he ended the contract back on in the UK while he had confirmation that the contract had indeed terminated it carried on working regardless for years afterward and he was really caning the usage and practically forced me to make calls home to relatives despite protestations from myself.i wouldn't ordinarily do so.

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Clearly the right thing to do is try to inform them of their mistake.

In reality as this seems to be some sort of retentions boondoggle, I doubt they'll ever get it 'right'. Do you want a quiet life?

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