Jump to content
House Price Crash Forum

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

Riedquat

Wasps

Recommended Posts

I braved sticking my head up in the loft above the false ceiling for the first time the other day, and saw a wasp's nest about 3 foot in diameter up there. Fun. It's still alive at the moment but they should (hopefully) all die off in the next month or two. Any reason not to just let them die off? From a bit of Googling it sounds like the nest won't be re-used, and the little sods aren't getting into the house.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I like wasps and scorpions, and ducks. :blink:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not many insects I hate but wasps are one of them. I would be up there like Ripley from Aliens with a flamethrower!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not many insects I hate but wasps are one of them. I would be up there like Ripley from Aliens with a flamethrower!

Very tempting and I can't stand wasps either but my hatred isn't quite at the "I'll burn the house down if it gets rid of them" level. If it was somewhere in the open on the other hand...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I braved sticking my head up in the loft above the false ceiling for the first time the other day, and saw a wasp's nest about 3 foot in diameter up there. Fun. It's still alive at the moment but they should (hopefully) all die off in the next month or two. Any reason not to just let them die off? From a bit of Googling it sounds like the nest won't be re-used, and the little sods aren't getting into the house.

This time of year leave them. They're probably nearly dead already.

They won't repopulate the nest, but clearly they like your loft environment so you might get more next year. If they don't bother you leave them. If they get in the house you might like to deal with it - it only takes a couple of wasps in a show to spoil your day.

Most people would call an exterminator these days, but for a small nest the spray foams you get are fantastic. They will make your wasps very angry, though. I've used a combination of fly-spray in the space (to slow them down) an then foam. But do consider that if you deal with one it is very likely that you'll get stung somewhat.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The main reason for getting rid of them would be that I really need to get some work done on the roof (there's daylight visible around the chimney breast) and I doubt that the roofer will be keen on being up there and getting attacked by them. I find finding one person to get a job done stressful enough as it is though.

Another reason is that there's a slight noise at night I'd put down to something electrical somewhere (sound of the fridge getting up to the bedroom perhaps) but could well be the wasps.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not many insects I hate but wasps are one of them. I would be up there like Ripley from Aliens with a flamethrower!

I know exectly what you mean!

We had a wasps nest in our loft a few years ago.

Late in the summer we had noticed a few, dozy half dead looking wasps inside the home. We had assumed they were coming in through the perpetually open windows, from the back garden. They were coming in through the windows - but from the upper floor windows at the rear of the house that were located just near a small opening in the roof near the guttering.

BUT I only discovered this by chance (almost fatally!) whilst rummaging around in the loft. My ars* came with inches of bumping into the nest, hidden in a darkened corner. I spotted the nest by chance at last moment and froze in fear, then backing away very very slowly.

Then venturing out into the rear garden and looking back at the house I could see the few stray wasps coming and going to and from the house from a specific point near the guttering.

Solution? Straight to the supermarket. Bought several aerosol tins of wasp killer. Ventured back into the loft and, wearing scuba googles to protect my eyes, took a huge breath, held it and emptied the entire spray can contents on to the nest surface - leaving it soaking wet!

Never saw a wasp again after that.

Wasn't quite a flamethrower approach, but felt like it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I braved sticking my head up in the loft above the false ceiling for the first time the other day, and saw a wasp's nest about 3 foot in diameter up there. Fun. It's still alive at the moment but they should (hopefully) all die off in the next month or two. Any reason not to just let them die off? From a bit of Googling it sounds like the nest won't be re-used, and the little sods aren't getting into the house.

Phone the Kremlin. They will deal with the yellow terrorists.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I had a wasps nest in the cellar a few years ago. They were entering the cellar through an air brick at the front of the house, and then finding their way into the lounge from the cellar. I did the Ripley sweep of the cellar to work out which air brick they were using, then squirted one of the foams directly into the nest. To avoid the risk of getting stung I waited until dusk before going into killer mode. The foam worked a treat. It killed all the wasps in one application. We haven't had any problems since.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Go out and collect as many spiders, bees, and wasps from other people's gardens as you can in a selection of cheap glass jars. Infiltrate them quietly near the nest... then remotely shatter the jars.

Set up a camera first tho.

Maybe stick a cat up there too.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If they're not bothering anybody, I would leave them.

When you look at the intricate construction of a wasps' nest, it seems a shame to destroy it.

We have had a stack of wasps' nests in our loft - apparently they will not use the same one twice - but the only time we had to commit mass murder was when we were having windows replaced - one was very close to where the wasps were going in and out and one of the fitters was allergic to wasp stings. They wouldn't do it unless we got rid of them.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wasps are nice, They are so yellow and stripey! And they want to share my beer.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Looks like it'll be leave it then, and possibly plug any obvious gaps when the roof gets fixed (although they seem to be coming in under the eaves which might not be easily plugable. Thanks folks

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't think wasps like smoke? ;)

Yeah. .that's why they usually drink in beer gardens. Their Evolution hasn't caught on to modern legislation yet.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah. .that's why they usually drink in beer gardens. Their Evolution hasn't caught on to modern legislation yet.

They like beer and jam. It's a wonder they can still fly.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We've had two experiences with wasps nests. The first was in our loft just above our daughters bedroom when she was seven or eight. She was quite frightened by the scratching noise she heard whilst she was trying to go to sleep. I went into the loft to find out what was making the noise and I put my hand down almost in the nest. Fortunately I didn't disturb it. I beat a hasty retreat and called a pest controller. He turned up a few days later. Put on his protective gear and sprayed the nest. The noise my daughter heard was the wasps chewing the plaster board to make their nest.

The second was in the garden of our present house the weekend we moved in. I noticed a few wasps flying around the beech hedge near our back gate, but thought nothing of it. Of course we were in and out quite frequently moving stuff in and taking boxes out. The joys of moving. One of the bastards stung me on my shoulder, I was obviously too near their nest. My wife spotted it, it was an exquisite structure about the size of large grapefruit. Again we called a pest controller, he came about a week later and sprayed the nest. It had been enlarged to the size of a watermelon by then. It looked like a Chinese paper lantern, very exquisite.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A £5 tin of wasp nest foam spray sorts out small to medium sized nests. They've got about a 10ft range so you don't need to get too close.

What's the range of a wasp?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What's the range of a wasp?

Zero feet.

Their sting needs to make physical contact with your skin.

It's perfectly safe to shoot it with the foam spray from a distance and then retreat to safety. Of course if you don't have good access or a quick escape route then get someone in. I've dealt with half a dozen small nests myself and only got the pest controller in twice when the nest was inside a chimney.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • Next General Election   92 members have voted

    1. 1. When do you predict the next general election will be held?


      • 2019
      • 2020
      • 2021
      • 2022

    Please sign in or register to vote in this poll. View topic


×

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.