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Steppenpig

On Tiles

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When did those 30*60 cm tiles becomes so dominant? And why so much brown? It really is like the 70s. Or was it the 50s.

If you were building a shower in an alcove, would you feel obliged to tile underneath the showere tray, or be happy to trust the silicon squirty to ensure the thing stayed watertight?

Should I take special precautions where the wash machine sits, as it does seem to vibrate.

(I've actually got a bloke to do it, but I suspect he may not be a thoufoughbred qualified professional. I alos know doing it myself is perfectly possible, but just need to get this sorted quick)

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Personally, I would 'tank' the area under and behind the shower rather than tiling under it. Contrary to popular belief, most tile installations are not actually water-proof but water-resistant. There's a difference. What is the sub floor?

what do you mean by precautions under the washing machine? From what? water damage? vibration? Is it on tiles? What is the sub floor? Solid? suspended?

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I used to have a washing machine that I though tvibrated a lot, turns out it was the fixings of the worktops that were loose the actual machine was really smooth.

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Update / new topic

Tiler has now done kitchen. Overall very pleasing. Big format (60cm * 60cm). At the moment, they have whitish grout wash" on them, which actually makes them look like limestone. I am tempted to try to seal it in (no, not really, but tempting all the same)

The negatives (why are there always negatives?). I hadn't really noticed, that there is a fall in the floor of a couple of centimeters over about 2.4 meters, towards the partition wall, which is probably the weak link, water penetration wise. Although corners have been sealed with water insulation tape and stuff, It would potentially mean water pooling under tha cabinets and utilities here.

Options.

1. Bung some self leveling compound on top,for last 60cm. It will be under cabinets and appliances, so not visible.

2. Get tiler to dig up tiles and put self leveling compound underneath. (Probably not as expensive as it sounds, in the scheme of things, Cheaper, say, than a new wash mashine. I expect it would need a lot of angle grinding and get very dusty, and I am really sick of dusty)

3. Do nothing, maybe stick a bit of vinyl under the appliances for a bit of extra water security, cross fingers.

4. Move main kitchen appliances to adjacent wall, where slope is advantageous. (This would be actually annoying, as this is where it was before, and had moved all the plumbing to new position, and also just sawed up the old work surface. I really should have thought about the floor first).

Secondly, I just want to know if I am crazy or my tiler. We removed all the skirting boards, door frame trimmings etc, so we could lay the lovely big square tiles unhindered, but I hadn't noticed that the door sill sticks out a tiny bit into the floor space. It is a 100 year old bit of worn wood. Now I would have thought the obvious soulution was to saw/chisel this off, but my tiler instead decided the solution was to nibble off a quarter of an inch from one edge of two of my lovely big square tiles. Because of the wea of the door sill, in the middle it is now below the new tile level, and at the edges higher, so needs some other solution anyway. Why would you do that? OK; I'm over it now.

Thanks

ps, underfloor is chipboard.

pps, I realise this is impossible to answer objectively. maybe i just need hugz.

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For a shower, you want layers of protection. Tiles will do for the floor where it gets splashed a bit, but not where it's under the full flow. And squirty sealant can never be more than part of the solution, either. Unless I were paying a premium price to a builder in whom I had a lot of confidence, I'd be installing a regular (shop-bought) cubicle with the shower.

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Update / new topic

Tiler has now done kitchen. Overall very pleasing. Big format (60cm * 60cm). At the moment, they have whitish grout wash" on them, which actually makes them look like limestone. I am tempted to try to seal it in (no, not really, but tempting all the same)

The negatives (why are there always negatives?). I hadn't really noticed, that there is a fall in the floor of a couple of centimeters over about 2.4 meters, towards the partition wall, which is probably the weak link, water penetration wise. Although corners have been sealed with water insulation tape and stuff, It would potentially mean water pooling under tha cabinets and utilities here.

Options.

1. Bung some self leveling compound on top,for last 60cm. It will be under cabinets and appliances, so not visible.

2. Get tiler to dig up tiles and put self leveling compound underneath. (Probably not as expensive as it sounds, in the scheme of things, Cheaper, say, than a new wash mashine. I expect it would need a lot of angle grinding and get very dusty, and I am really sick of dusty)

3. Do nothing, maybe stick a bit of vinyl under the appliances for a bit of extra water security, cross fingers.

4. Move main kitchen appliances to adjacent wall, where slope is advantageous. (This would be actually annoying, as this is where it was before, and had moved all the plumbing to new position, and also just sawed up the old work surface. I really should have thought about the floor first).

Secondly, I just want to know if I am crazy or my tiler. We removed all the skirting boards, door frame trimmings etc, so we could lay the lovely big square tiles unhindered, but I hadn't noticed that the door sill sticks out a tiny bit into the floor space. It is a 100 year old bit of worn wood. Now I would have thought the obvious soulution was to saw/chisel this off, but my tiler instead decided the solution was to nibble off a quarter of an inch from one edge of two of my lovely big square tiles. Because of the wea of the door sill, in the middle it is now below the new tile level, and at the edges higher, so needs some other solution anyway. Why would you do that? OK; I'm over it now.

Thanks

ps, underfloor is chipboard.

pps, I realise this is impossible to answer objectively. maybe i just need hugz.

You poor thing.

((Hugz))

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From experience I would say getting the tiles back up should be your absolute last resort.

My own 'solution' would be to trust the sealant and avoid getting the floor wet I.e. live with it.

As an aside we've been having various bits and pieces done around the house and I've found tradesmen to be pretty hit and miss. So far not one of them has done a completely fantastic job (a bit like your guy shaving the tiles instead of the wood). They're on money for old rope as outside of electrics and gas there's nothing particularly difficult if you have the right tools.

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Just that I prefer the warm soft than the cold hard. ;)

I started of trying to do it really modestly, but it is so nice looking I almost wish i'd gone for underfloor heating. I like it a few degrees cooler than most people though.

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For a shower, you want layers of protection.

Went with plumber and tilers advice to seal the room floor and the shower tray sits on top with silicone sealing. Probably best not to think about it too much any more. The building management seems to have good insurance anyway. They paid for my damage (but not the additional new tiling etc) after flood fro upstairs.

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Yeah, somehow it wasn't as comforting as I imagined anyway.

OK HPC mode.

What are you doing wasting your money on tiles.

And is this your own home? Why haven't you STRd already.

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OK HPC mode.

Downsized and diversified (turned out to have misjudged the political climate, but try not to dwell).

Floor destroyed by flood from upstairs.

Cost of tiling floor is probably less than one months rent in UK.

That's all you get for one hugz.

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From experience I would say getting the tiles back up should be your absolute last resort.

My own 'solution' would be to trust the sealant and avoid getting the floor wet I.e. live with it.

As an aside we've been having various bits and pieces done around the house and I've found tradesmen to be pretty hit and miss. So far not one of them has done a completely fantastic job (a bit like your guy shaving the tiles instead of the wood). They're on money for old rope as outside of electrics and gas there's nothing particularly difficult if you have the right tools.

I've just had a bathroom refit and tiled floor to ceiling with more mistakes than I believe I'd have made if I'd done it myself (even for a burd). I could tile with 6 x 6 ceramic but large porcelain tiles would have gotten the better of me. I'd agree with the comments regarding tradesmen. I hate the f*%king lot of 'em. Can't get the electrician back in to fix the humidistat extractor either.

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I would never trust tiles to hold water. We had a rental with a shower floor which was tiled. The water ran STRAIGHT THROUGH the grouting to the neighbours downstairs like a waterfall!

A get cubicle.

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I've just had a bathroom refit and tiled floor to ceiling with more mistakes than I believe I'd have made if I'd done it myself (even for a burd). I could tile with 6 x 6 ceramic but large porcelain tiles would have gotten the better of me. I'd agree with the comments regarding tradesmen. I hate the f*%king lot of 'em. Can't get the electrician back in to fix the humidistat extractor either.

A bathroom is an HPC extravagance! :unsure:

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Update / new topic

Tiler has now done kitchen. Overall very pleasing. Big format (60cm * 60cm). At the moment, they have whitish grout wash" on them, which actually makes them look like limestone. I am tempted to try to seal it in (no, not really, but tempting all the same)

The negatives (why are there always negatives?). I hadn't really noticed, that there is a fall in the floor of a couple of centimeters over about 2.4 meters, towards the partition wall, which is probably the weak link, water penetration wise. Although corners have been sealed with water insulation tape and stuff, It would potentially mean water pooling under tha cabinets and utilities here.

Options.

1. Bung some self leveling compound on top,for last 60cm. It will be under cabinets and appliances, so not visible.

2. Get tiler to dig up tiles and put self leveling compound underneath. (Probably not as expensive as it sounds, in the scheme of things, Cheaper, say, than a new wash mashine. I expect it would need a lot of angle grinding and get very dusty, and I am really sick of dusty)

3. Do nothing, maybe stick a bit of vinyl under the appliances for a bit of extra water security, cross fingers.

4. Move main kitchen appliances to adjacent wall, where slope is advantageous. (This would be actually annoying, as this is where it was before, and had moved all the plumbing to new position, and also just sawed up the old work surface. I really should have thought about the floor first).

Secondly, I just want to know if I am crazy or my tiler. We removed all the skirting boards, door frame trimmings etc, so we could lay the lovely big square tiles unhindered, but I hadn't noticed that the door sill sticks out a tiny bit into the floor space. It is a 100 year old bit of worn wood. Now I would have thought the obvious soulution was to saw/chisel this off, but my tiler instead decided the solution was to nibble off a quarter of an inch from one edge of two of my lovely big square tiles. Because of the wea of the door sill, in the middle it is now below the new tile level, and at the edges higher, so needs some other solution anyway. Why would you do that? OK; I'm over it now.

Thanks

ps, underfloor is chipboard.

pps, I realise this is impossible to answer objectively. maybe i just need hugz.

That sounds like a shoddy job. :o

In my experience it's best to never leave a tradesman out of sight and discuss every detail of what he's doing with him, not just beforehand but also whenever you see him doing something that doesn't look right to you.

He might not like it but he's the one getting paid so he has no say.

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