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Steppenpig

Price Of Building Stuff

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Jeezuscrist, 100 quid for a a bit of flat plastic with a hole in it. It would take a dozen more industrial steps to turn it into a toy tractor, and then it would only sell for 9.99. Do the directors of shower tray manufacturing companies travel to work by space shuttle? Do all the workers come by rols royce?

And another 50 quid for a bit of shaped polystyren to sit it on, less complex than the average packing that a telly comes with.

Why aren't the chinese flooding the market with shower trays?

("flooding" ho ho)

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Probably a fiver to make in China, a fiver to ship over a few thousand miles, a tenner for UK logistics and warehousing, and the rest to the store and the Exchequer.

China gets the bum deal.

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Jeezuscrist, 100 quid for a a bit of flat plastic with a hole in it. It would take a dozen more industrial steps to turn it into a toy tractor, and then it would only sell for 9.99. Do the directors of shower tray manufacturing companies travel to work by space shuttle? Do all the workers come by rols royce?

And another 50 quid for a bit of shaped polystyren to sit it on, less complex than the average packing that a telly comes with.

Why aren't the chinese flooding the market with shower trays?

("flooding" ho ho)

it depends on lots of things. First is it a generic part that can be used in any shower or just one.

If it is just or one type of shower it will be more expensive, because the volume is less.

When you make up a piece of plastic in low volume, the cost isn't in the plastic,it's in the mould. So let's say you want to make 100 parts, you have to amortise the cost of the mould across those parts. It the mould costs say 5 grand to make up, then you've immediately got 50 quid on the mould per part to recover across those 100 parts.

So low volume stuff is going to be more expensive. Then you get the captive market element. Some people tend to charge what they can get away with for stuff. Car parts are typical here. So if you have no option to get the part anywhere else, the cost will go up massively.

Once you start to look at commodity items (eg a washing up bowl) the economics change. The bowl can be used in any sink, so the total sales potential becomes much larger. The cost of the mould becomes much less significant and the cost of the actual material and the energy of the production process comes into play.

Then you have things like the type of plastic. It might be a special strong plastic, or a specialist plastic for a particular application. For example PTFE is very expensive. Good temperature handling and great as a dielectric. So it's great for capacitor dielectrics, but would make a lousy washing up bowl because it would be too expensive.

The bottom line is you can't look at two pieces of plastic and assume the economics of producing them is the same.

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it depends on lots of things. First is it a generic part that can be used in any shower or just one.

If it is just or one type of shower it will be more expensive, because the volume is less.

When you make up a piece of plastic in low volume, the cost isn't in the plastic,it's in the mould. So let's say you want to make 100 parts, you have to amortise the cost of the mould across those parts. It the mould costs say 5 grand to make up, then you've immediately got 50 quid on the mould per part to recover across those 100 parts.

So low volume stuff is going to be more expensive. Then you get the captive market element. Some people tend to charge what they can get away with for stuff. Car parts are typical here. So if you have no option to get the part anywhere else, the cost will go up massively.

Once you start to look at commodity items (eg a washing up bowl) the economics change. The bowl can be used in any sink, so the total sales potential becomes much larger. The cost of the mould becomes much less significant and the cost of the actual material and the energy of the production process comes into play.

Then you have things like the type of plastic. It might be a special strong plastic, or a specialist plastic for a particular application. For example PTFE is very expensive. Good temperature handling and great as a dielectric. So it's great for capacitor dielectrics, but would make a lousy washing up bowl because it would be too expensive.

The bottom line is you can't look at two pieces of plastic and assume the economics of producing them is the same.

I make injection moulds for my own stuff sometimes.

I have one tool that made one part per product and cost the previous owner £35,000 prior to me buying it and converting it for my own use. It only made about 500 parts to that point so the maths was self explanatory

And that's just for injection moulding, never mind Vac forming, rotational moulding, extrusion etc where the numbers and tool cost are different.

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it depends on lots of things. First is it a generic part that can be used in any shower or just one.

If it is just or one type of shower it will be more expensive, because the volume is less.

When you make up a piece of plastic in low volume, the cost isn't in the plastic,it's in the mould. So let's say you want to make 100 parts, you have to amortise the cost of the mould across those parts. It the mould costs say 5 grand to make up, then you've immediately got 50 quid on the mould per part to recover across those 100 parts.

So low volume stuff is going to be more expensive. Then you get the captive market element. Some people tend to charge what they can get away with for stuff. Car parts are typical here. So if you have no option to get the part anywhere else, the cost will go up massively.

Once you start to look at commodity items (eg a washing up bowl) the economics change. The bowl can be used in any sink, so the total sales potential becomes much larger. The cost of the mould becomes much less significant and the cost of the actual material and the energy of the production process comes into play.

Then you have things like the type of plastic. It might be a special strong plastic, or a specialist plastic for a particular application. For example PTFE is very expensive. Good temperature handling and great as a dielectric. So it's great for capacitor dielectrics, but would make a lousy washing up bowl because it would be too expensive.

The bottom line is you can't look at two pieces of plastic and assume the economics of producing them is the same.

Nah - it is just value pricing. Did the OP actually buy it? What proportion of similar people would purchase? That price point probably took £ks to arrive at.

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