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longtomsilver

First Dental Appointment Since 2003 Today.

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I had my first dental appointment since 2003 (used to get treatment provided within the services) and never bothered registering with one or a doctors until very recently. Toothache made me go (first an emergency temporary filling) and now to get it fixed once and for all.

Good news is that the tooth can be saved.. lower left moler no.6 apparently and the dentist offered root canal and a crown (either porcelain or amalgam) for the NHS cost of £200 all in.

I'm actually thinking of going for a gold crown as research leads me to believe it's the best material for longevity (upto 50 years) and does not wear opposing teeth unlike ceramics/porcelain?

Advice please?

I'm assuming I can't just supply the material (?4 grams £100) and have it done under the fixed price menu.

Advice please.

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Gold teeth make you look really hard and pimpy! Go for it! :wacko:

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Seriously though, most of the top dentists do advise the use of gold first. Obviously there are alternatives, but gold remains the best thing to use.

There is the bling/optical factor though.

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Pretty much all dentists acknowledge gold is best - and pretty much the only filling that could last a lifetime.

But most people go for the cosmetic.

[i find it odd that I only found out about the benefits of gold fillings after having a casual conversation about it with the dentist - it wasn't offered as an option]

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Gold teeth make you look really hard and pimpy! Go for it! :wacko:

DO YOU KNOW WHO I AM! :P:D:D

Errol. I don't mind the optics/bling factor as it's a fair few teeth back which isn't so prominent. If it costs me an additional ?£600 now I figure I'll save this back from fewer follow appointments/repairs. I've read that porcelain crowns can last anywhere between 2-12 years, amalgam up to 20 years and gold the big 5 0. If I live to 70 (another 32 years, I'll be quids in) any age after that is money in the bank.

4:0 in favour. Perhaps I should do a poll.

Edit: One more in the yes camp thanks dgul.

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My dentist offered to pull all my teeth out and replace them with implants - 2,000 euros a tooth, so that would be 64,000 euros in total! I asked what it would cost on the French Health Service, he said that was the Health Service rate.

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My dentist offered to pull all my teeth out and replace them with implants - 2,000 euros a tooth, so that would be 64,000 euros in total! I asked what it would cost on the French Health Service, he said that was the Health Service rate.

A really terrible dentist then. I did panic and guessed I'd lose that tooth and was just going to push for an implant until I learned of the horror stories.

Implants cause gum loss so they will eventually sit proud on titanium stems and they bypass the bite reflex (there's a name for it?) and if you chew on something hard like a seed it'll be the full force which in turn/time leads to jaw wear.

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I have heard of one or two horror stories about Dentists...A friend of mine was in agony, so he went to his private dentist...He was told that a number of teeth were "screwed" and had to be sorted out - "By the way that's £2,500 please"..."I can't afford that at the moment"..."Oh don't worry, here's the loan forms"...

Doubts circled in his mind, so went to stay at a friends. He knew a dentist, and told him to go and visit him...He did...After a consultation, he was told around a thousand pounds....Now he doesn't know who to trust, so he gets a third opinion after a chance encounter with a dental hygienist he knows. Pays that Dentist a visit...Paid about three hundred quid all in...

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A really terrible dentist then. I did panic and guessed I'd lose that tooth and was just going to push for an implant until I learned of the horror stories.

Implants cause gum loss so they will eventually sit proud on titanium stems and they bypass the bite reflex (there's a name for it?) and if you chew on something hard like a seed it'll be the full force which in turn/time leads to jaw wear.

In the end I've had 2 molars removed. I'm not that happy really. 1 molar was split down the middle but the dentist said he had to remove the rear molar (wisdom tooth) to get the 2nd molar out. Removing the 2nd molar was not fun - for a split tooth it put up a lot of resistance. Now the dentist wants to put implants in at around 2 to 3k per implant but I'm not keen on that idea either.

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Probably the thing that people should take away from this thread is this:

Try to visit your dentist for a check-up at least once a year. At the very longest once every two years.

Most problems are treated easily if picked up early. If you wait too long you risk losing teeth and the costs rise.

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Not sure I entirely agree with that, Errol. I have not been to the dentist for nearly 30 years. None have fallen out. I still have the filling I had when I was 14. Bar the odd ache/soreness when the wisdom teeth were coming through and chipping one while cracking brazil nuts a couple of Xmas's ago - I've never had any problems.

Reckon I must have saved myself thousands. I do spend a decent amount of cash on electric toothbrushes, toothpaste and floss though.

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Not sure I entirely agree with that, Errol. I have not been to the dentist for nearly 30 years. None have fallen out. I still have the filling I had when I was 14. Bar the odd ache/soreness when the wisdom teeth were coming through and chipping one while cracking brazil nuts a couple of Xmas's ago - I've never had any problems.

Reckon I must have saved myself thousands. I do spend a decent amount of cash on electric toothbrushes, toothpaste and floss though.

Not been in twenty years...I fastidiously brush twice a day...

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Not been in twenty years...I fastidiously brush twice a day...

Interesting, Dave. I wonder if we are outliers or the norm of prolonged dentist avoiders who make an effort?

Personally, I was inspired by seeing a perfect set of heavily worn nashers on an ancient skull of a 40 something prehistoric man as a teen. Whatever the prehistoric guy died of, it wasn't tooth decay.

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Interesting, Dave. I wonder if we are outliers or the norm of prolonged dentist avoiders who make an effort?

Personally, I was inspired by seeing a perfect set of heavily worn nashers on an ancient skull of a 40 something prehistoric man as a teen. Whatever the prehistoric guy died of, it wasn't tooth decay.

I think there was a topic on here a while ago, about this....I think there are a few of us around....I hate it if I miss a brushing session...I just don't feel right...

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The rule of thumb seems to be that if you have no problems by your mid twenties (down to a combination of natural enamel strength, diet, dental hygiene) then you will pretty much be fine.

I've had no problems and think my milky tea habit has a lot to do with it.

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