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Future Proofing Ownership - Growth Of The Sharing Economy -R4 N

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Future Proofing Ownership Does the growth of the sharing economy mean ownership is over?

ON AIR NOW

http://www.bbc.co.uk/radio4

Re- Listen

http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b068xjtj

PROGRAMMES Start Time 20:00 - End Time 20:45

Ownership

Presenters Timandra Harkness and Leo Johnson look at their belongings, and those of others, with fresh eyes as they ask - is ownership over? It may be a central pillar of most societies, but in the future will people still want to own so much stuff if they can easily share?

Financial constraints and increased awareness of the planet's finite resources may mean a new generation is prizing access and experience over belongings. The growing tech revolution can provide the digital platforms to make this possible. FutureProofing unpicks the consequences: Will we see a shift in our attitudes towards owning physical objects? What will be the implications of the new ideas economy? And can objects own themselves?

The programme tackles these subjects with the help of writer Rachel Botsman, Daan Weddepohl of Peerby, software developer Mike Hearn, psychology lecturer Sheila Cunningham, journalist Paul Mason, the residents of Christiania in Copenhagen, and the comedian George Carlin with his routine on 'stuff'.

Edited by Saving For a Space Ship

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The phrase 'sharing economy' has always annoyed me a bit because it is changing the meaning of the word 'sharing'.

If a landlord rents you his home, is he 'sharing' it with you?

If a driver drives you somewhere in exchange for money, is he 'sharing' with you?

The 'sharing economy' really is not an innovation or a new era in technology or business. It is basically a socially acceptable form of renting or paying for services that makes people feel warm inside. Why? Because sharing, feels nicer or more connected or human than 'buying' or 'renting'. In my own personal definition, it also means 'without cost'. If you share a room with someone, you are not charging them. If you share a pizza or some cake with someone, you are not charging them.

http://tomslee.net/2013/08/why-the-sharing-economy-isnt.html

Big venture capitalist and private equity firms want you to think that the 'sharing economy' is good for you when it is about making a bunch of middlemen wealthy indeed. (Not that it is a bad thing.)

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The phrase 'sharing economy' has always annoyed me a bit because it is changing the meaning of the word 'sharing'...

...making a bunch of middlemen wealthy indeed. (Not that it is a bad thing.)

I bet they're not 'sharing'.

https://dizzynomics.wordpress.com/2015/08/05/breaking-the-wheel/

"...for networks to genuinely unscale they have to be true sharing economy models. That means homeswapping rather than Airbnb. Carpooling not Uber. Shared dining, not bespoke individualised dining at home. Problem is those models genuinely can’t scale, so they won’t ever be squillion dollar unicorn businesses...

West’s point ultimately is that humanity tends to pile resources into the models that can scale. This, of course, is why we’ve ended up with the rise of the Faux Sharing Economy, epitomised by Uber and Airbnb, not homeswapping or carpooling.

These companies don’t stop the scaling effect. To the contrary, they speed it up. Indeed, the only difference between their models and conventional corporate models is that they transfer the cost and risk of fixed asset acquisition to an unlimited amount of contractors, thus breaking the corporate structure’s ability to keep things in check and to prevent over-investment. There are no five year plans in this sector. From a scaling and innovation cycle point of view these outsourcing corporates grow like cancers because there is no management oversight or control over growth and investment. From the perspective of companies like Uber the more regions, human and fixed capital they control the better..."

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This was one of the sharing sites at beginning of prog. http://www.Peerby.com

Article

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/09/03/business/smallbusiness/sharing-economy-goes-hyperlocal-with-a-growing-market-for-household-items.html

The growth in Freecycle or Freegle appears to me an example of the non profit making sharing economy. Users spend time listing the items to give away & dealing with collections, rather than throwing them away, and not sharing.

Although , this may have other benefits in time / money saving, ie. not having to transport the item to the local recycling centre

Edited by Saving For a Space Ship

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This was one of the sharing sites at beginning of prog. http://www.Peerby.com

Article

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/09/03/business/smallbusiness/sharing-economy-goes-hyperlocal-with-a-growing-market-for-household-items.html

The growth in Freecycle or Freegle appears to me an example of the non profit making sharing economy. Users spend time listing the items to give away & dealing with collections, rather than throwing them away, and not sharing.

Although , this may have other benefits in time / money saving, ie. not having to transport the item to the local recycling centre

I stopped using our local Freecycle when it became apparent that the people picking up the stuff I was giving away were then listing it for sale on Gumtree / local paper website / ebay. I now try to flog stuff by the same means or Cash Converters et al, or ask on Facebook whether anyone I know wants it, if not it goes to charity shops - BHF even come and collect unwanted furniture.

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