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Prescott's Plans For A 'son Of Rates' Exposed

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http://www.conservatives.com/tile.do?def=n...e&obj_id=126900

Middle income families living in the south of England stand to bear the biggest additional burden, under the revaluation process which ministers had shelved, but are now under pressure to resurrect.

And under the Lyons proposals, council tax could be replaced with a 'son of rates' - where a tax is levied on the value of the home, meaning four-figure bills for many homes. This system is already being introduced in Northern Ireland, at a rate of 0.78 per cent on the home's value per year. Introduced in England, this could mean a yearly tax bill of £2,000, for example, on an average home in London, Harrogate or Solihull.

Gulp!

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This is ridiculous. What if someone is in a highly paid job, pays of their mortgage and then decides to retrain as, say, a teacher because they think it would be good for society. When I was at school some of my best teachers were middle aged entrants. Does anyone know if there are common sense arguments against local income taxes? Is it just a case of combining council tax and income tax would increase avoidance because of the greater benefit to do so?

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http://www.conservatives.com/tile.do?def=n...e&obj_id=126900

Middle income families living in the south of England stand to bear the biggest additional burden, under the revaluation process which ministers had shelved, but are now under pressure to resurrect.

And under the Lyons proposals, council tax could be replaced with a 'son of rates' - where a tax is levied on the value of the home, meaning four-figure bills for many homes. This system is already being introduced in Northern Ireland, at a rate of 0.78 per cent on the home's value per year. Introduced in England, this could mean a yearly tax bill of £2,000, for example, on an average home in London, Harrogate or Solihull.

Gulp!

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On my reading of the Interim Lyons report these claims are complete rubbish, correct me if I'm wrong - I'm wading through this report now.

As for a local government tax based on the value of your property "a tax is levied on the value of the home, meaning four-figure bills for many homes" council tax is already based on the value of your home, having such a tax does not automatically assume "four-figure bills for many homes".

To be clear what the Lyons report does is report on all suggested types of local government funding - which obviously gives opposition parties the opportunity to pick the least popular of these options and say that because it features in a government report the government has plans to implement it. It should be noted that Sir Michael Lyons' view of local government finance is at loggerheads with the views of many in the government and therefore even when Lyons' final report comes out it is highly questionable whether his recommendations would be introduced.

Edited by underpressuretobuy

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On my reading of the Interim Lyons report these claims are complete rubbish, correct me if I'm wrong - I'm wading through this report now.

As for a local government tax based on the value of your property "a tax is levied on the value of the home, meaning four-figure bills for many homes" council tax is already based on the value of your home, having such a tax does not automatically assume "four-figure bills for many homes".

To be clear what the Lyons report does is report on all suggested types of local government funding - which obviously gives opposition parties the opportunity to pick the least popular of these options and say that because it features in a government report the government has plans to implement it. It should be noted that Sir Michael Lyons' view of local government finance is at loggerheads with the views of many in the government and therefore even when Lyons' final report comes out it is highly questionable whether his recommendations would be introduced.

Thursday 15th December 2005

Homeowners across Northern Ireland will see a 19 per cent increase in their rates bills from next April, the Secretary of State said yesterday :o

http://www.newsletter.co.uk/rssstory/24930

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This is ridiculous. What if someone is in a highly paid job, pays of their mortgage and then decides to retrain as, say, a teacher because they think it would be good for society. When I was at school some of my best teachers were middle aged entrants. Does anyone know if there are common sense arguments against local income taxes? Is it just a case of combining council tax and income tax would increase avoidance because of the greater benefit to do so?

Taxation should be as close to the point of spending as possible. It is critical that local politicians have accountability. Our present system does not give this: three quarters of local taxes are raised nationally. In the US local and state taxes work in tandem with national taxes and while the system can be complex at least spending and taxing powers can be considered and voted upon together.

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  • 301 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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