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Steppenpig

Jamie's Sugar Rush

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Jamie Oliver doing a doc on the evil sugar. Will probably be crap, but at least it's mainstream. CH4 Sep 3rd

Interview on Ch4 news if you,ve got catch up etc, at about half way thru + (ending with a very right on but economically unsound plug for more immigrants at the end - the media-corporate-establishment hegemony's lust for more immigration is frankly a little bizzare. Why?)

Also in the news here

http://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2015/aug/27/jamie-oliver-sugar-rush-channel-4-crusade-save-britain-health

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So we have an entire industry dedicated to filling processed foods with sugar in order to make their ready meals taste good, and the proposed solution is to tax consumers on their sugary drink intake?

I think he's barking up the wrong tree with this one.

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They should start with "Oakhouse Foods". I'm crap at cooking and when partner was going to be away for a couple of weeks I thought I'd order a stack of their ready meals.

They called to ask for feedback.

"I don't eat that much, but the portions are very small and covered in so much sugar or salt they are barely edible. I know I'm not really your target market, but I won't be ordering again. I've had enough of endlessly pacing up and down the hallway because I can't sit still after having consumed one of your meals"

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One thing I noticed in my recent phase of mass TV watching, was several people on come dine me and one or two chefs on other cooking programs admitted their guilty secret was, that they put a spoonfull of sugar in their cooking. There are a few things I do this with myself occasionally, but I try to resist the temptation, but I have never heard anyone else mention it before. I think there is a creeping tendency for the food industry to put more sugar where it doesn't belong, which messes with our estimation of sweetness, so we even need to add it to home cooking. Then of course, the industrials need to up the amount of sugar in their dishes to make them taste "better" than the home cooking, and it is a never ending cycle

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Yeah. I got into the habit of adding sugar to my pasta sauces. Then I'd add lemon juice to balance it out. Then more sugar

..more lemon...little more sugar.. Etc.

I must admit that it did taste good but in retrospect I was just matching my sauces to the taste of the ready made ones from the shop.

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Yep, sugar in pastas sauce, bolognese etc is great but only a pinch and only if the tomatoes are a bit sharpish, it smooths the flavour out.

Pauli does it in the Sopranos so its got to be good!

As my dear old granny you say "everything in moderation"

....but then she used to dip fresh picked strawberries in sugar.....

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I bought a bread maker a few years ago, which came with a few basic recipes. Turns out it was made for the american market - the first recipe we tried called for 5 teaspoons of brown sugar in it. Not knowing any better we stupidly did so, and promptly binned the finished product.

I think posters above are right, its just seeped into our cooking in a chicken/egg situation with the processed ready meals.

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Yep, sugar in pastas sauce, bolognese etc is great but only a pinch and only if the tomatoes are a bit sharpish, it smooths the flavour out.

Pauli does it in the Sopranos so its got to be good!

As my dear old granny you say "everything in moderation"

....but then she used to dip fresh picked strawberries in sugar.....

If you've had shop-bought strawberries in the last 30 years you'll know why.

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Quite, it's been bred into our popular varieties of fruit, our peas, sweetcorn, tomatoes....everything tastes sweet to me these days. And they all say on the side of the seed packet "extra sweet" as though that were a selling point. I guess it must be. It's even becoming more difficult for people to escape the sugar additive thing by growing your own.

Errr, no. I meant that shop-bought strawberries have no taste, being watery aberrations of nature, bred purely for shape and shelf life.

Grow your own and discover what real strawberries taste like. Anyone under 40 probably has never tasted a proper strawberry.

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I bought a bread maker a few years ago, which came with a few basic recipes. Turns out it was made for the american market - the first recipe we tried called for 5 teaspoons of brown sugar in it. Not knowing any better we stupidly did so, and promptly binned the finished product.

I think posters above are right, its just seeped into our cooking in a chicken/egg situation with the processed ready meals.

You do need a teaspoon of sugar, but I think that's more to do with giving the yeast something to get started with, rather than making a huge doughnut (or 'donut') loaf as you've described!

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Errr, no. I meant that shop-bought strawberries have no taste, being watery aberrations of nature, bred purely for shape and shelf life.

Grow your own and discover what real strawberries taste like. Anyone under 40 probably has never tasted a proper strawberry.

Agree, I grew my own once very successfully and was amazed by the sweetness. Only a small couple of metres patch but got a decent crop. Unfortuantely have never bothered again but will do one day as I'm not over 40 :P

As for wanting to add sweetness to dishes, use fruits (as the gardener says brilliant if it's homegrown but not accessible to all or those that can't be arsed, like me). If you don't want the lumpy parts then small the shit out of them and strain or buy a juicer.

Another thing when making sauces is always make sure things like tomatoes/peppers are roasted first to bring out the natural sugars.

It's a weird thing that we try and emulate the taste of store purchased sauces when they're so full of crap. Mind that said it's been years since I've tried any apart from when eating out with colleagues. I've recently been on a bit of a ketchup frenzy (started with fish, amazing history!) making beetroot, chilli beet, carrot, curry and red pepper so far. Still got mushroom, aubergine, pineapple, chilli pineapple, roobarb, red onion and watermelon to go and then I'm having a chip mad weekend! (Will post up recipe links if anyone wants them).

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You do need a teaspoon of sugar, but I think that's more to do with giving the yeast something to get started with, rather than making a huge doughnut (or 'donut') loaf as you've described!

Yes exactly - and that one did taste very much like a doughnut!

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Sorry to go OT, but I always found Cheeky Girls - Lembit Opik thing funny - In my imagination, girl come over from Romania and does what would work best in Romania - get hooked up with a politician. That strategy didn't count on the Liberal Democrats...

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Quite, it's been bred into our popular varieties of fruit, our peas, sweetcorn, tomatoes....everything tastes sweet to me these days. And they all say on the side of the seed packet "extra sweet" as though that were a selling point. I guess it must be. It's even becoming more difficult for people to escape the sugar additive thing by growing your own.

Fruit and veg are naturally sweet. Those intended by nature to be eaten particularly so: it's precisely to attract the animals that'll spread the seed.

Errr, no. I meant that shop-bought strawberries have no taste, being watery aberrations of nature, bred purely for shape and shelf life.

Grow your own and discover what real strawberries taste like. Anyone under 40 probably has never tasted a proper strawberry.

Speak for yourself. I find bought strawberries very varied. With the supermarket ones it's pot luck (some years are better than others), but if I buy the local ones from the chap on the corner of the market I know they'll be delicious.

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Can anyone explain why, when I had a four-day stay in hospital some months ago, all the desserts on offer (even the bloomin' yoghurt) was smothered in ten times more sugar than a supermarket equivalent? Isn't that the sort of thing Jamie is supposed to be concerned about?

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Can anyone explain why, when I had a four-day stay in hospital some months ago, all the desserts on offer (even the bloomin' yoghurt) was smothered in ten times more sugar than a supermarket equivalent? Isn't that the sort of thing Jamie is supposed to be concerned about?

Easy answer....hospitals should be providing treatment not crap food......food in hospitals should be paid for by those that eat it, crap food that is wasted should not have to be paid for by the national health service, they have more important things to pay for.....good choices.

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Easy answer....hospitals should be providing treatment not crap food......food in hospitals should be paid for by those that eat it, crap food that is wasted should not have to be paid for by the national health service, they have more important things to pay for.....good choices.

And if you can't afford to pay for it you get it for free. Means test everything then see who bothers to work.

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The trouble is sugar gets all the blame whereas it is diet as a whole is to blame. eg, how long does it take to digest white bread into sugar, compared with digesting sugar directly?

Also, I hate all this 'for the kids' stuff. While there is a problem with overweight children, by and large it is the obese older folk who are causing all the problems. I appreciate that it is the children who grow up to be the obese adults, but it would be possible to sort out much of the problems with education and drop the (minimal) tax. Anyway, I taxation probably won't help - I doubt the average heavy person would be dissuaded by adding 5p onto their bottle of pop at the checkout.

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And if you can't afford to pay for it you get it for free. Means test everything then see who bothers to work.

People pay to eat every day...good food does not have to be expensive....processed warmed up crap is expensive to produce, not appetising and not always good for you.......there is a better way.........I or anyone else can provide a healthy alternative to what crap hospitals in the nhs offer their customers. ;)

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The trouble is sugar gets all the blame whereas it is diet as a whole is to blame. eg, how long does it take to digest white bread into sugar, compared with digesting sugar directly?

Also, I hate all this 'for the kids' stuff. While there is a problem with overweight children, by and large it is the obese older folk who are causing all the problems. I appreciate that it is the children who grow up to be the obese adults, but it would be possible to sort out much of the problems with education and drop the (minimal) tax. Anyway, I taxation probably won't help - I doubt the average heavy person would be dissuaded by adding 5p onto their bottle of pop at the checkout.

The main problem with sugar is that is contains a moiety of fructose with the glucose. Fructose is metabolised in a similar way to alcohol. Ie in the liver to fatty acids and then to triglycerides (in most people who do not train intensely). This causes insulin resistance.

Comparisons of glucose powder with fructose powered have shown that glucose does not cause insulin resistance, but fructose does.

But yes i agree, white bread is not a high quality food and is too quickly digested. In fact the oral glucose tolerance test used to use white bread and only switched to glucose as it was easier to ingest as you could put it in a drink. The glycaemic index of white bread and pure glucose powder is both 100.

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