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340 New Homes. None Affordable

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http://www.manchestereveningnews.co.uk/news/greater-manchester-news/newton-heath-target-latest-huge-9920807

Local developers Realty Estates want to build 340 new homes on Riverpark industrial estate, near to Phillips Park.

None of them will be affordable housing, however, according to proposals being considered by the council this week.

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Of course they are affordable out they wouldn't sell any. Affordable housing just means a select few get a nice discount paid for by the folk that have to buy the others.

How is that fair

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Of course they are affordable out they wouldn't sell any. Affordable housing just means a select few get a nice discount paid for by the folk that have to buy the others.

How is that fair

  • Location:Mars.

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They can make it affordable....increase the price, no deposit down, payable over the next two generations......600 months @ £600 a month...easy. ;)

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The terms affordable homes and living wage have been appropriated to mean specific things different to their literal meaning.

All houses should be cheaper but that's not achieved by subsidising a subset of people

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"Affordable" is such a nebulous phrase. It can mean "get a free house because you tick the right boxes whether you deserve [whether anyone does] a free house or not" or it can mean "the bank think you might be able to pay back a massive debt, so congratulations, the property is 'affordable' to you" - essentially "affordable" in that case means "move all of your chips to one square and bet your life on that one square - that's what we define 'affordable'".

Affordable (without the quotes) to me means to be able to buy something in cash, with plenty of cash left over in the bank. But hey, that's just me, and I know even many here will disagree with this description - fair enough. Property must always equal a mortgage. Yep. Must always equal 6 figures plus in pounds. Yep. I've just bought another property in Thailand - where this message is being typed from - price tag, five thousand pounds sterling. Fast internet, air con, big living space, modern shower and toilet. Anyone could do that - if you are so inclined. ANYONE (with five thousand quid) - don't come to me with "oh the law says you can't buy property if you're a foreigner" (answer: the law says you can). Affordable.

Edited by canbuywontbuy

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Unless....workable polices are put into place.......once an affordable home sold 'as affordable' is sold it then becomes unaffordable....like 'the right to buy'...bought at £30k, sold at £300k + depending. ;)

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The terms affordable homes and living wage have been appropriated to mean specific things different to their literal meaning.

All houses should be cheaper but that's not achieved by subsidising a subset of people

+1

'affordable' is just a buzzword, nothing more. Calculated to give people warm 'vote for me' feelings.

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Why would the Govt ever want to change this situation when it can sit on its ass and build nothing yet make x10 the amount it used to plus all that lovely lolly from the BTL brigade?

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Why would the Govt ever want to change this situation when it can sit on its ass and build nothing yet make x10 the amount it used to plus all that lovely lolly from the BTL brigade?

two words, civil unrest

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Local developers Realty Estates want to build 340 new homes on Riverpark industrial estate, near to Phillips Park.

None of them will be affordable housing, however, according to proposals being considered by the council this week.

You have to wonder through which looking glass we have passed in order to arrive at a place where a commodity is created that no one can afford to buy and yet somehow that commodity does not adjust in price to the point at which people can afford to buy it. What am I missing here?

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You have to wonder through which looking glass we have passed in order to arrive at a place where a commodity is created that no one can afford to buy and yet somehow that commodity does not adjust in price to the point at which people can afford to buy it. What am I missing here?

Keynesian economics. Through that distorting lens it makes complete sense.

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You have to wonder through which looking glass we have passed in order to arrive at a place where a commodity is created that no one can afford to buy and yet somehow that commodity does not adjust in price to the point at which people can afford to buy it. What am I missing here?

Credit.

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Answer: "The British public needs a “dead baby on the beach” moment or an “appalling fire where some beautiful young children die” for opinion to change in favour of social housing development, the boss of one of the nation’s biggest housing associations has claimed".

21_180.png

The provocative comments were made by Kate Davies (pictured), chief executive of the Notting Hill Housing, at Property Week’s RESI Conference at Celtic Manor in south Wales this week.

Speaking as part of a panel discussion on the housing crisis yesterday, Davies told conference delegates the solution to the nation’s housing crisis had to come from a change in public opinion. She said: “You have to get to a tipping point where the change happens. I have met respectable people, reasonable people, even people in this room, and people on housing associations, who when faced with a planning permission for social housing will object to it. “People will say they don’t want social tenants in my neighbourhood, I don’t want a building to be built near me. In a way that’s an unacceptable position to take. Whereas you couldn’t say I don’t like black people, I don’t like fat people, I don’t like gay people. That isn’t acceptable anymore. Not liking social tenants is seen as acceptable still.” When asked how these attitudes could be changed and how the housing crisis could be resolved, Davies said: “Now, you see a dead baby on the beach in Turkey, and the attitude to refugees changes overnight. Because somehow that connected to people emotionally in a way that lots of other people dying as refugees had not impacted on people. “And in housing I think we need two things. Either we need an appalling fire where some beautiful young children die, or a riot. We have to get people to feel differently about housing because it needs a huge effort, it needs a lot of money, and needs to be a political priority.” After the BBC’s Mark Easton, who was chairing the panel discussion, challenged Davies on her comment, the housing association boss defended her position, saying “we need a disaster or a riot” to make the public realise the importance of building affordable homes.

http://www.propertyweek.com/news/housing-crisis-needs-dead-baby-on-beach-moment/5076542.article?origin=PWbreakingnews

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Answer: "The British public needs a “dead baby on the beach” moment or an “appalling fire where some beautiful young children die” for opinion to change in favour of social housing development, the boss of one of the nation’s biggest housing associations has claimed".

21_180.png

The provocative comments were made by Kate Davies (pictured), chief executive of the Notting Hill Housing, at Property Week’s RESI Conference at Celtic Manor in south Wales this week.

Speaking as part of a panel discussion on the housing crisis yesterday, Davies told conference delegates the solution to the nation’s housing crisis had to come from a change in public opinion. She said: “You have to get to a tipping point where the change happens. I have met respectable people, reasonable people, even people in this room, and people on housing associations, who when faced with a planning permission for social housing will object to it. “People will say they don’t want social tenants in my neighbourhood, I don’t want a building to be built near me. In a way that’s an unacceptable position to take. Whereas you couldn’t say I don’t like black people, I don’t like fat people, I don’t like gay people. That isn’t acceptable anymore. Not liking social tenants is seen as acceptable still.” When asked how these attitudes could be changed and how the housing crisis could be resolved, Davies said: “Now, you see a dead baby on the beach in Turkey, and the attitude to refugees changes overnight. Because somehow that connected to people emotionally in a way that lots of other people dying as refugees had not impacted on people. “And in housing I think we need two things. Either we need an appalling fire where some beautiful young children die, or a riot. We have to get people to feel differently about housing because it needs a huge effort, it needs a lot of money, and needs to be a political priority.” After the BBC’s Mark Easton, who was chairing the panel discussion, challenged Davies on her comment, the housing association boss defended her position, saying “we need a disaster or a riot” to make the public realise the importance of building affordable homes.

http://www.propertyweek.com/news/housing-crisis-needs-dead-baby-on-beach-moment/5076542.article?origin=PWbreakingnews

All housing should be "affordable".

Our problem at the moment is that those that can still afford it are the same people who could admit that half of housing costs are "taxes" extracted by the finance industries.

We need to accept the toxic impact of the finance sector's activities and then we'll start to see improving affordability.

Its NOT the numbers of homes but the costs of housing that is the problem.

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Of course they are affordable out they wouldn't sell any. Affordable housing just means a select few get a nice discount paid for by the folk that have to buy the others.

How is that fair

+100

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Answer: "The British public needs a “dead baby on the beach” moment or an “appalling fire where some beautiful young children die” for opinion to change in favour of social housing development, the boss of one of the nation’s biggest housing associations has claimed".

21_180.png

The provocative comments were made by Kate Davies (pictured), chief executive of the Notting Hill Housing, at Property Week’s RESI Conference at Celtic Manor in south Wales this week.

Speaking as part of a panel discussion on the housing crisis yesterday, Davies told conference delegates the solution to the nation’s housing crisis had to come from a change in public opinion. She said: “You have to get to a tipping point where the change happens. I have met respectable people, reasonable people, even people in this room, and people on housing associations, who when faced with a planning permission for social housing will object to it. “People will say they don’t want social tenants in my neighbourhood, I don’t want a building to be built near me. In a way that’s an unacceptable position to take. Whereas you couldn’t say I don’t like black people, I don’t like fat people, I don’t like gay people. That isn’t acceptable anymore. Not liking social tenants is seen as acceptable still.” When asked how these attitudes could be changed and how the housing crisis could be resolved, Davies said: “Now, you see a dead baby on the beach in Turkey, and the attitude to refugees changes overnight. Because somehow that connected to people emotionally in a way that lots of other people dying as refugees had not impacted on people. “And in housing I think we need two things. Either we need an appalling fire where some beautiful young children die, or a riot. We have to get people to feel differently about housing because it needs a huge effort, it needs a lot of money, and needs to be a political priority.” After the BBC’s Mark Easton, who was chairing the panel discussion, challenged Davies on her comment, the housing association boss defended her position, saying “we need a disaster or a riot” to make the public realise the importance of building affordable homes.

http://www.propertyweek.com/news/housing-crisis-needs-dead-baby-on-beach-moment/5076542.article?origin=PWbreakingnews

Why do people not like favoured people who pay half what they do for a better product? It is a mystery to some obvious to others.

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On 9/9/2015 at 2:04 PM, Northerner said:

Answer: "The British public needs a “dead baby on the beach” moment or an “appalling fire where some beautiful young children die” for opinion to change in favour of social housing development, the boss of one of the nation’s biggest housing associations has claimed".

21_180.png

The provocative comments were made by Kate Davies (pictured), chief executive of the Notting Hill Housing, at Property Week’s RESI Conference at Celtic Manor in south Wales this week.

Speaking as part of a panel discussion on the housing crisis yesterday, Davies told conference delegates the solution to the nation’s housing crisis had to come from a change in public opinion. She said: “You have to get to a tipping point where the change happens. I have met respectable people, reasonable people, even people in this room, and people on housing associations, who when faced with a planning permission for social housing will object to it. “People will say they don’t want social tenants in my neighbourhood, I don’t want a building to be built near me. In a way that’s an unacceptable position to take. Whereas you couldn’t say I don’t like black people, I don’t like fat people, I don’t like gay people. That isn’t acceptable anymore. Not liking social tenants is seen as acceptable still.” When asked how these attitudes could be changed and how the housing crisis could be resolved, Davies said: “Now, you see a dead baby on the beach in Turkey, and the attitude to refugees changes overnight. Because somehow that connected to people emotionally in a way that lots of other people dying as refugees had not impacted on people. “And in housing I think we need two things. Either we need an appalling fire where some beautiful young children die, or a riot. We have to get people to feel differently about housing because it needs a huge effort, it needs a lot of money, and needs to be a political priority.” After the BBC’s Mark Easton, who was chairing the panel discussion, challenged Davies on her comment, the housing association boss defended her position, saying “we need a disaster or a riot” to make the public realise the importance of building affordable homes.

http://www.propertyweek.com/news/housing-crisis-needs-dead-baby-on-beach-moment/5076542.article?origin=PWbreakingnews

My Goodness, I am currently compiling a communication to the housing minister and local MP around "affordable housing" and was researching HPC for ammuition. .

Stumbled across this.

Alas, Grenfell Tower may be this black swan.

 

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56 minutes ago, hp72 said:

My Goodness, I am currently compiling a communication to the housing minister and local MP around "affordable housing" and was researching HPC for ammuition. .

Stumbled across this.

Alas, Grenfell Tower may be this black swan.

 

Not really. Grenfell House just brought to everyone living outside of London how much of London's social housing is occupied by non Brits.

 

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On 8/25/2015 at 12:10 PM, giesahoose said:

Of course they are affordable out they wouldn't sell any. Affordable housing just means a select few get a nice discount paid for by the folk that have to buy the others.

How is that fair

+1000, apologies I posted that 2 years ago.

Edited by iamnumerate

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2 hours ago, spyguy said:

Not really. Grenfell House just brought to everyone living outside of London how much of London's social housing is occupied by non Brits.

 

Horrific story, truly sad for all the innocent people who were caught up in it. But, when it was being reported I just couldn't understand how so many Morrocans, Ethiopians, Lebanese have come to be living in England. Are they all doctors? Their countries aren't EU, they were never Commonwealth, who has invited them here and then killed them ffs?

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11 minutes ago, Calcutta said:

Horrific story, truly sad for all the innocent people who were caught up in it. But, when it was being reported I just couldn't understand how so many Morrocans, Ethiopians, Lebanese have come to be living in England one of the world's most expensive borough. Are they all doctors? Their countries aren't EU, they were never Commonwealth, who has invited them here and then killed them ffs?

The other year, my Mum was talking about the 50th anniversary of Aberfan. Now, we are not Welsh but had miners in the family - some went to dig out dead kids when it happened.

It was a horrible event that really affected members of my family. My mum was saying - Oh those poor kids would have been mid 50s.

When I talked about Greenfell with her, she felt nothing. No affinity there. 'Why are there loads of foreign people, living in social housing house in the middle of London?' And 'Maybe it would nt  have been so bad if theyd not all come to London and expected to be housed'

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