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MrPin

Definition Of Kids

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The "Kids Company" thread got me thinking. My assumption is that "kids" are under 15, not under 25.

When did you stop being a "kid". Obviously in law you are not an adult at 15, but a lot of people started their working life at that age. Discuss. :huh:

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To me a kid is a baby goat. Hate it when people refer to children as kids.

We can say "children" then, although it involves more typing. I would have been rather upset to be described as a child when I was 15. People start treating you as an adult about then.

Cripes, I wasn't independent until 25 really. :blink: Still parents do "stuff" for you, not necessarily financially, but I moved a lot and needed somewhere to put my "stuff".

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Kids are under 16.

Over that they can be dependent or vulnerable young adults in need of support (such as orphans) but they're not kids or children.

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We can say "children" then, although it involves more typing. I would have been rather upset to be described as a child when I was 15. People start treating you as an adult about then.

Cripes, I wasn't independent until 25 really. :blink: Still parents do "stuff" for you, not necessarily financially, but I moved a lot and needed somewhere to put my "stuff".

At my first job back around 2000 I had a 64 year old boss who still lived with his parents, never moved out of their council semi. He earned a good wage, worked all his life and lived in a cheap bit of the fens. Aside from the top of the housing boom he could have probably bought a decent house in that area each and every year. Still saw him driving his knackered mid 80s pug 309 a few years back.

No idea what he did with all his money...he certainly didnt spend it on women!

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At my first job back around 2000 I had a 64 year old boss who still lived with his parents, never moved out of their council semi. He earned a good wage, worked all his life and lived in a cheap bit of the fens. Aside from the top of the housing boom he could have probably bought a decent house in that area each and every year. Still saw him driving his knackered mid 80s pug 309 a few years back.

No idea what he did with all his money...he certainly didnt spend it on women!

Well he certainly didn't waste it on cars. :blink:;)

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Kids are under 16.

Over that they can be dependent or vulnerable young adults in need of support (such as orphans) but they're not kids or children.

About that age. I remember being there. Young man would be OK, or young woman if I wore a dress. "Child" does not go down well with people of that age, although I am rather flattered to be called a "stupid boy" at my age. :blink:

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The "Kids Company" thread got me thinking. My assumption is that "kids" are under 15, not under 25.

When did you stop being a "kid". Obviously in law you are not an adult at 15, but a lot of people started their working life at that age. Discuss. :huh:

Abused and children that have high level of emotional problems, be it coming out of the care system, having breakdowns in a safe and stable family environment or coming from a chaotic household or have been left home alone to look after themselves with no one to guide them or learn from are stunted in emotional and maturity growth and can still be child like in their early twenties.......some children with safety and security in a close and supportive family environment are more adult like at 15 than those at the age of 30.....make of that what you will.....I have had no official training, just observation and interaction with young people......children are like sponges they pick up everything that is around them.....anything bad can take many years or a lifetime to shake off. ;)

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Abused and children that have high level of emotional problems, be it coming out of the care system, having breakdowns in a safe and stable family environment or coming from a chaotic household or have been left home alone to look after themselves with no one to guide them or learn from are stunted in emotional and maturity growth and can still be child like in their early twenties.......some children with safety and security in a close and supportive family environment are more adult like at 15 than those at the age of 30.....make of that what you will.....I have had no official training, just observation and interaction with young people......children are like sponges they pick up everything that is around them.....anything bad can take many years or a lifetime to shake off. ;)

If for the last 18 years this charity has been inundated with children with problems, then what has been done to address the causes?

Throwing money at the end result isn't a solution. It just lets the problems go on.

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If for the last 18 years this charity has been inundated with children with problems, then what has been done to address the causes?

Throwing money at the end result isn't a solution. It just lets the problems go on.

Like many things......illnesses for example, curing or solving the problem takes away the income stream.....managing/maintaining it sees funding will be ongoing.......charity is a kind of privatisation of our social care system, why are they not dealing with these urgent issues and instead passing onto those ill equipped to deal with never mind solve.......for very many the disadvantaged are a constant income/career and a urgent need that will require indefinite growing sums of money.....how about trying to treat the cause not the symptoms?

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I would class a kid as sub-13.

There's a never ending supplied of problem kids. They'll always be with us, like the poor.

Expect a large flood of Gordon's tax credit babies to end up in foster homes when tax credit stops.

I'd define a child as anyone, no matter age, who cannot/willnot go out and work + support themselves.

My Mum + Dad are children - and not just not being able to support. Scary lack of sense.

My best Mum quote is 'Im sure the bank will not lend them money if they think they cannot pay it back'

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If for the last 18 years this charity has been inundated with children with problems, then what has been done to address the causes?

Throwing money at the end result isn't a solution. It just lets the problems go on.

Well, the support for London is easy - Move somewhere cheaper.

Liverpool - move somewhere with jobs.

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I may have accrued 50 years on the calendar, but am still somewhere around 11 in my head.

Becasue of this temporal imbalance, I earn far too much money for an 11-year old, and this allows me to buy lots of drugs and get jiggy with 'older' women - i.e. those around my calendar age.

Fookin' love childhood me like...

;)

XYY

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I wasn't talking about "problem kids" like Master XYY, I just wanted to get an idea of the view of how old a "child" needs to be to qualify.

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I wasn't talking about "problem kids" like Master XYY, I just wanted to get an idea of the view of how old a "child" needs to be to qualify.

Jesus Pinny - ya sound just like me fatha...

;)

XYY

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Jesus Pinny - ya sound just like me fatha...

;)

XYY

Is he from the lost Surrey tribe of Geordies? :wacko:

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Aye - the Godalming branch of the family...

XYY

Why, Godalming is dead posh, and full of antique shoppes, and the old ladies won't bottle you for "looking at them wrong" either.

I am from the other end of Surrey, where ridiculing a man's shed, can result in a wheelbarrow joust to the death.

I did some time up there on the mean streets of South Gosforth, and one of my housemate's most excellent piece of advice was "Divvent ye dress like a student, mon!", and to pretend I'm not from the South, by not saying anything. Also, when in the pub, do not order a drink, do not order a drink where the glass has a stalk, and there's a cherry in it.

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The "Kids Company" thread got me thinking. My assumption is that "kids" are under 15, not under 25.

When did you stop being a "kid". Obviously in law you are not an adult at 15, but a lot of people started their working life at that age. Discuss. :huh:

Dick head Cameroon has removed housing benefit from the under 25's, so the government are dictating a dependent age of 25.

You have to stay at school until 17

At 16 You can rent accommodation, but a guarantor is required until you’re 18 (this is an adult who can be responsible for you

At 17, you can drive

At 18 you can vote.

So, somewhere between 0 and 25, depending on how poor you are.

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Dick head Cameroon has removed housing benefit from the under 25's, so the government are dictating a dependent age of 25.

You have to stay at school until 17

At 16 You can rent accommodation, but a guarantor is required until you’re 18 (this is an adult who can be responsible for you

At 17, you can drive

At 18 you can vote.

So, somewhere between 0 and 25, depending on how poor you are.

YES that's correct. When I were a lad, we didn't all have regular work all the time, so we signed on when necessary, and that housing benefit enabled us to be independent. :blink:

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Do we technically recruit a "child army" then?

Most British soldiers look under 25..

I don't know what age you can join the army. I believe Norman Wisdom signed up at 14, but as a non combatant musician. That's an interesting thought. I bet you grow up quick in the army. :blink: Probably a better career than taking handouts for crack.

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Do we technically recruit a "child army" then?

Most British soldiers look under 25..

Interesting thought. If joined the army at 18 (which I think you can), then you had to leave [medical grounds, kicked out etc], you would be homeless and not allowed to claim for a bedsit until the "finger in the air age" of 25.

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Interesting thought. If joined the army at 18 (which I think you can), then you had to leave [medical grounds, kicked out etc], you would be homeless and not allowed to claim for a bedsit until the "finger in the air age" of 25.

Yes. I'm all for huge welfare reform, the benefits ceiling for one is long overdue, but the government is entirely failing to think through the implications of their sweeping reforms before bringing them in.

They (surely) do not intend that to happen, but that is how it will impact the individual.

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Yes. I'm all for huge welfare reform, the benefits ceiling for one is long overdue, but the government is entirely failing to think through the implications of their sweeping reforms before bringing them in.

They (surely) do not intend that to happen, but that is how it will impact the individual.

It's all wrong. Now that I have a bit of "gardening leave" I am signing on. All I am getting back is a bit of tax that I paid over the years. I have to log in on a web site. Now I'm lucky, as I have a payoff that will last until Christmas, if I don't blow it on stupid vehicles, but the web site DOES NOT WORK. And when I pop in on Wednesday I want to know who to complain to. Some people need that money now, and may not have internet access. What the ****** if I were younger, and had no money.

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