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Time To Buy Amazon Shares ?

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http://www.standard.co.uk/news/celebritynews/amazon-sign-top-gears-jeremy-clarkson-richard-hammond-and-james-may-for-new-show-10426102.html

Top Gear trio Jeremy Clarkson, Richard Hammond and James May have signed to present a new car show on the Amazon Prime streaming service in one of the biggest coups in TV history.

The programme will air for the first time next year and be produced by former Top Gear executive Andy Wilman, an old school friend of Clarkson’s who is credited with revamping the format and turning it into the world’s most successful factual TV show.

The deal ends months of speculation about the future of the most bankable star on British TV following Clarkson’s spectacular departure from the BBC after 27 years.

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I'd like to have a pint with James May, but the other two are loud ars8holes. I'll not be watching it, even though I like cars!

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Well, we've all had those mornings at work where we talk non-stop about the latest episode of Extant or whatever we watched on Amazon last night, haven't we?

No, thought not.

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Well, we've all had those mornings at work where we talk non-stop about the latest episode of Extant or whatever we watched on Amazon last night, haven't we?

No, thought not.

I think these "streaming services" are pissing upwind. It's so much easier to buy the boxed set of disks, and then you can't be "cut off" when the service goes bust. :blink:

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Amazon are notorious for making minimal profits and paying zero dividends because their chief executive is obsessed with lashing out squillions for every "next big thing" going. Why would you buy their shares?

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Amazon are notorious for making minimal profits and paying zero dividends because their chief executive is obsessed with lashing out squillions for every "next big thing" going. Why would you buy their shares?

They're looking over a hundred year timescale. Quite refreshing really, relative to the short sightedness of most companies.

With regards to streaming, we might not sit around talking about the latest thing on Netflix or Amazon TV, but the bet is your kids will. I think this is a really good move.

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Guest eight

$500+ whoops, bigcharts.com had that rounded to the 1 s.f.

Shit I could afford one before - I can't now. :(

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My sense is that the market for streaming TV and videos is emerging fast and will change quite radically.

It will certainly shake up the "thirty quid a month for a package" Sky style offerings. "It's all or nothing. No, you can't just have the X channel, you have to buy a pack with a dozen channels that you will never watch".

On the other hand, I can't see people having a Netflix sub, an Amazon sub, maybe a sports sub as well - it's going to add up in cost, so it's all about which service has the killer thing at the time; Netflix had 'Breaking Bad'.

The market has yet to find a "level" that people will pay. People will pay six quid for Netflix, but only as long as that series is on, the rest is largely filler material. Arguably that service is way too cheap to really have decent content. Amazon Prime has the backing and money, but again for movies, when I looked, it was a poor affair.

I'm not sure I'd want to pick an eventual winner at this point.

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My sense is that the market for streaming TV and videos is emerging fast and will change quite radically.

It will certainly shake up the "thirty quid a month for a package" Sky style offerings. "It's all or nothing. No, you can't just have the X channel, you have to buy a pack with a dozen channels that you will never watch".

On the other hand, I can't see people having a Netflix sub, an Amazon sub, maybe a sports sub as well - it's going to add up in cost, so it's all about which service has the killer thing at the time; Netflix had 'Breaking Bad'.

The market has yet to find a "level" that people will pay. People will pay six quid for Netflix, but only as long as that series is on, the rest is largely filler material. Arguably that service is way too cheap to really have decent content. Amazon Prime has the backing and money, but again for movies, when I looked, it was a poor affair.

I'm not sure I'd want to pick an eventual winner at this point.

I think they'll all form part of the landscape. Sports is an interesting one. Its only a matter of time before Netflix dip their toe into live sports.

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BT have taken a bit of a gamble with the sports rights, buoyed on by their 1bn they got from the taxpayer to try and reinvent their shoddy old phone network as some sort of broadband network.

Which in turn makes live streaming a possibility for people who don't live in cabled areas, where it was not before.

There will be arguments about transit costs (of the data, over networks - ISPs are all happy to scream the "unlimited" word until people actually start to use it) and broadband costs will rise, or, prioritisation might mean that your 50 Meg Infinity thing can't stream Netflix properly as the agreements aren't in place (data transfer further back, not just down the pipe to your house), but it will stream Amazon Prime and BT Sport. At the moment increases tend to be put onto the line rental to disguise them.

Back to the sport, which just happens to be a good example of content bidding - any company that makes a killer series is going to be able to play the bidders off against each other which in turn raises prices while even now a movie is still nearly a fiver to rent on Apple TV as it is and box sets are very expensive. Much better to buy the Blu-Rays.

The company making the show knows full well that the streaming service (Sky, Amazon) stands to profit by way of the package and the availability not just "that series" and is going to be looking to extract everything that they can. So it probably makes sense for Amazon and Netflix to make their own shows.

The price versus quality of content thing is going to rage for a long time and I sense that one of the bigger players will be left standing. Probably, Sky, with a redefined offering.

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BT have taken a bit of a gamble with the sports rights, buoyed on by their 1bn they got from the taxpayer to try and reinvent their shoddy old phone network as some sort of broadband network.

Which in turn makes live streaming a possibility for people who don't live in cabled areas, where it was not before.

There will be arguments about transit costs (of the data, over networks - ISPs are all happy to scream the "unlimited" word until people actually start to use it) and broadband costs will rise, or, prioritisation might mean that your 50 Meg Infinity thing can't stream Netflix properly as the agreements aren't in place (data transfer further back, not just down the pipe to your house), but it will stream Amazon Prime and BT Sport. At the moment increases tend to be put onto the line rental to disguise them.

Back to the sport, which just happens to be a good example of content bidding - any company that makes a killer series is going to be able to play the bidders off against each other which in turn raises prices while even now a movie is still nearly a fiver to rent on Apple TV as it is and box sets are very expensive. Much better to buy the Blu-Rays.

The company making the show knows full well that the streaming service (Sky, Amazon) stands to profit by way of the package and the availability not just "that series" and is going to be looking to extract everything that they can. So it probably makes sense for Amazon and Netflix to make their own shows.

The price versus quality of content thing is going to rage for a long time and I sense that one of the bigger players will be left standing. Probably, Sky, with a redefined offering.

The streaming sites are trying to break out of this by producing their own content though. Netflix are getting close to producing a killer series, both 'House of Cards' and 'Orange is the New Black' are close. Sense8 is a bit of a disappointment. Now it's Amazon's turn with top gear.

On the point of Amazon though, and service providers, the supply/value chain and where the power lies it's worth noting that Netflix uses Amazon's Web Services. The massive investment that Amazon is making now is, IMHO a bid to become the internet.

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On the point of Amazon though, and service providers, the supply/value chain and where the power lies it's worth noting that Netflix uses Amazon's Web Services. The massive investment that Amazon is making now is, IMHO a bid to become the internet.

Their major vulnerability lies with the UK ISPs. And whether they wish to permit the transit of that data over their networks for an inclusive price to the end customer, and how much they then seek to charge Amazon. I have a feeling we're going to be hearing quite a lot about this ("net neutrality") in the coming years.

Other countries would probably ban ISPs selectively blocking or downgrading specific traffic to ensure neutrality. In the UK we'd rush through a hastily worded white paper of bad ideas and fast track it through parliament to support the ISPs :)

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Their major vulnerability lies with the UK ISPs. And whether they wish to permit the transit of that data over their networks for an inclusive price to the end customer, and how much they then seek to charge Amazon. I have a feeling we're going to be hearing quite a lot about this ("net neutrality") in the coming years.

Other countries would probably ban ISPs selectively blocking or downgrading specific traffic to ensure neutrality. In the UK we'd rush through a hastily worded white paper of bad ideas and fast track it through parliament to support the ISPs :)

There was an argument brewing about this a few years back, wasn't there? I vaguely recall one of the ISPs complaining about other companies making more money from their infrastructure than they did themselves. It's a reasonable point, but what can they do?

I guess there's a lot of maturing left to do yet. Will Amazon go as far as buying the entire infrastructure? They could probably afford it.

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Their major vulnerability lies with the UK ISPs. And whether they wish to permit the transit of that data over their networks for an inclusive price to the end customer, and how much they then seek to charge Amazon. I have a feeling we're going to be hearing quite a lot about this ("net neutrality") in the coming years.Other countries would probably ban ISPs selectively blocking or downgrading specific traffic to ensure neutrality. In the UK we'd rush through a hastily worded white paper of bad ideas and fast track it through parliament to support the ISPs :)

Sky, Virgin and BT are major ISPs so they have both ends covered. I think that is an issue the likes of Amazon need to address. If they want Amazon Prime to fly they need to get out of running just data centres and provide an end to end network service as well.I suspect they realise this fact.

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