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Qetesuesi

What Would Happen?

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So you pick out a nice big iceberg, say a couple of miles across.

You land your rig on it, position it right above its centre of mass, and start melting a borehole hundreds of feet down to where its CoM would be.

You then lower your device to the bottom of said well.

You seal it up with cold seawater which quickly freezes over and around the device for a perfect airless seal.

Then you retreat several miles, and detonate the thermonuclear device.

Describe the physics and visible effects of the seconds after that moment.

Of course nobody could ever attempt this. Just wondering exactly "what would happen".

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So you pick out a nice big iceberg, say a couple of miles across.

You land your rig on it, position it right above its centre of mass, and start melting a borehole hundreds of feet down to where its CoM would be.

You then lower your device to the bottom of said well.

You seal it up with cold seawater which quickly freezes over and around the device for a perfect airless seal.

Then you retreat several miles, and detonate the thermonuclear device.

Describe the physics and visible effects of the seconds after that moment.

Of course nobody could ever attempt this. Just wondering exactly "what would happen".

okay suppose the iceberg is square and 3000m on a side (a couple of miles) and 100m thick. I make that 9x10^14 grams of ice. The latent heat of fusion of water is 334 J/g so to melt the iceberg takes roughly 3*10^17 Joules of energy

a kT of TNT equivalent is 4TJ or 4x10^12 joules, thus melting this mass of ice would take of the order of 100,000 KT or 100MT. Far more than the largest A-bomb ever tested. in practice the water will vapourise close to the bomb which will soak up a l lot more energy.

so it wont melt it, when underground tests occur, the bomb vapourises the rock for a few meters around the bomb and then the void collapses creating a small crater at the suface, i expect something like this would happen for the usual A-bomb test size of 10-100kt.

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Of course nobody could ever attempt this. Just wondering exactly "what would happen".

So you're not a terrorist, this is a thought experiment out of idle curiosity.

Thought experiments are thought crimes.

Oh, and BTW, what if the iceberg was replaced by a vat of custard? I am curious too.

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So you're not a terrorist, this is a thought experiment out of idle curiosity.

Thought experiments are thought crimes.

Oh, and BTW, what if the iceberg was replaced by a vat of custard? I am curious too.

the police would use it for restraining neer-do-wells.

or maybe that's because I'm a bit hard of hearing and couldn't quite figure out why magistrates order them to be remanded in it.

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okay suppose the iceberg is square and 3000m on a side (a couple of miles) and 100m thick. I make that 9x10^14 grams of ice. The latent heat of fusion of water is 334 J/g so to melt the iceberg takes roughly 3*10^17 Joules of energy

a kT of TNT equivalent is 4TJ or 4x10^12 joules, thus melting this mass of ice would take of the order of 100,000 KT or 100MT. Far more than the largest A-bomb ever tested. in practice the water will vapourise close to the bomb which will soak up a l lot more energy.

so it wont melt it, when underground tests occur, the bomb vapourises the rock for a few meters around the bomb and then the void collapses creating a small crater at the suface, i expect something like this would happen for the usual A-bomb test size of 10-100kt.

Good calculating.

I imagine a similar mass of custard (thixotropic mixture) would be even more of a damp squib.

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So you pick out a nice big iceberg, say a couple of miles across.

You land your rig on it, position it right above its centre of mass, and start melting a borehole hundreds of feet down to where its CoM would be.

You then lower your device to the bottom of said well.

You seal it up with cold seawater which quickly freezes over and around the device for a perfect airless seal.

Then you retreat several miles, and detonate the thermonuclear device.

Describe the physics and visible effects of the seconds after that moment.

Of course nobody could ever attempt this. Just wondering exactly "what would happen".

Why could nobody attempt it ?

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Why could nobody attempt it ?

Because getting hold of a thermonuclear device is quite difficult. They cost a bomb and no country is going to waste $1.2 billion blowing up an iceberg.

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Because getting hold of a thermonuclear device is quite difficult. They cost a bomb and no country is going to waste $1.2 billion blowing up an iceberg.

I take that as a challege. I'm starting a Kickstarter funds appeal first thing tomorrow.

Got a nuclear device purchase potentially lined up. Anyone know where I can get an iceberg?

Note to GCHQ: Just kidding. I'm not really going to buy an iceberg.

Anyone know where I can bulk-buy custard?

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So you're not a terrorist, this is a thought experiment out of idle curiosity.

Thought experiments are thought crimes.

Why could nobody attempt it ?

I hereby pronounce you man and wife :D

Because getting hold of a thermonuclear device is quite difficult. They cost a bomb

You don't say!

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