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Is Going Back To College To Worth It?

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Hi all, in a dead end job slow paying job since graduating (approaching 30) and think the only way out of the cycle is to retrain. I am eligible for 24+ loans that have just come in. In your opinion what college courses out there are good for career prospects?



I didn't get a student loan out for my first degree (I stayed with parents), I am not eligible for a loan for a second degree. I don't know how that works, it just means that a second degree is financially not possible for me, unless I do teaching or an NHS related degree. They are fiercely competitive also, applied and did not get to interview.



In short, is it worth quitting my job, or cutting down hours to take a part-time/full-time college course? I am skeptical to how valuable college course are to degrees, or maybe I am being naive.



Thanks


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Hi all, in a dead end job slow paying job since graduating (approaching 30) and think the only way out of the cycle is to retrain. I am eligible for 24+ loans that have just come in. In your opinion what college courses out there are good for career prospects?

I didn't get a student loan out for my first degree (I stayed with parents), I am not eligible for a loan for a second degree. I don't know how that works, it just means that a second degree is financially not possible for me, unless I do teaching or an NHS related degree. They are fiercely competitive also, applied and did not get to interview.

In short, is it worth quitting my job, or cutting down hours to take a part-time/full-time college course? I am skeptical to how valuable college course are to degrees, or maybe I am being naive.

Thanks

What are you planning on doing, work-wise?

Most FE courses these day are dire - cake decorating + the like.

The only FE courses that can give you a job are the vocational ones - building + trades related.

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You are asking the wrong question, how about:

"What is the value of what I will learn?"


Answer this by comparing the supply/demand ratio for people with these skills.


You haven't said your profession. I work in software and can name a bunch of jobs that are impossible to fill right now regardless of salary.

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A Masters could be worthwhile otherwise a professional qualification or at least working towards one will open doors. APM CIMA etc.

Try and find a new job would probably be easier and more rewarding, especially at the moment.

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I did, at the age of 30, I stopped driving buses and other silly jobs and went back to college for a degree in information systems and technology. Was it worth it? Hell yes, first wife left, got a good job, two kids by second wife. The problem is you can't know at the outset how it is going to turn out. Read Antifragile: Things that Gain from Disorder at least three times and then decide, you won't understand it the first two times. Life is not a gaussian curve, its fractel - subject to inexplicable changes just when you thought you knew where you were going.

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I did what you'd call a micky mouse subject, I could pursue this further by applying for a studentship to do a masters and phd to work in research, but I did that degree 6+ years ago, so it probably won't happen. I also hear socio-economic gov research is boring as hell. So that is basically a no, after phd I'd expect to still be earning under 20k for a long time. They don't pay well.

All the vocational courses in college are geared towards eventually doing a degree, so it is difficult. Working in trade is not what I envisage.

I have read about learning to do coding/programming, there aren't any real courses for these but it is something I find worth looking into.

Thanks

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If you want to get into education, then having a degree is a strength AFAIK.

Try jobs that don't require a teaching qual, like teaching assistants in schools and colleges, go for zero hours contracts through agencies like protocol national. If you pester them and get in touch with likely schools or colleges they may try you for a few weeks and keep you if you're suited or dump you if not.

Also try exam invigilation posts, temporary at exam time (unsurprisingly). Another way of seeing whether you fit with students. Also through agencies and also direct to universities and colleges.

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I did what you'd call a micky mouse subject, I could pursue this further by applying for a studentship to do a masters and phd to work in research, but I did that degree 6+ years ago, so it probably won't happen. I also hear socio-economic gov research is boring as hell. So that is basically a no, after phd I'd expect to still be earning under 20k for a long time. They don't pay well.

All the vocational courses in college are geared towards eventually doing a degree, so it is difficult. Working in trade is not what I envisage.

I have read about learning to do coding/programming, there aren't any real courses for these but it is something I find worth looking into.

Thanks

I think you'd struggle to return to your previous subject - but if you are willing to pay who knows? Whether it'll translate to a career I would be sceptical. Academia is a conservative place, and often suspicious of those who haven't followed the traditional path - and I'd suggest a succession of crappily paid post-docs is a young person's game.

With coding/programming - an online course/teaching yourself can be a good way to go. Find some basic tutorials and then set yourself some challenges to build things you'd personally find useful. Going part time with work might give you enough time although at 30 you probably still have enough energy to work on it while holding down an undemanding full time job.

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I have read about learning to do coding/programming, there aren't any real courses for these but it is something I find worth looking into.

Coding is one of those skills you can pick up at home, using free online tools and tutorials, and ends up paying extremely well.

The barrier to entry is that learning is a huge time sink, and you have to have a passion to build something you like.

Apart from that, you'll do infinitely better if you get mentorship from someone who knows what they are doing, can tell you what skills are in demand, and show you where you are going wrong.

Academia isn't the place you should be looking to find people like that.

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Coding is great if you're into it. Same with sysadmin I should think. But only if you're into it. I suspect your degree background suggests you aren't, but you'll find out by giving it a go.

Edited by Si1

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Coding is great if you're into it. Same with sysadmin I should think. But only if you're into it. I suspect your degree background suggests you aren't, but you'll find out by giving it a go.

Depends on the background. Those with a background in human languages can sometimes transfer those skills into coding.

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I'd go back to Uni just to shag around. Why not? If you are in shape, your life experience and money, as long as you have eaten the red pill, should mean you are in the top 5% of blokes there.

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Speaking for myself if I was starting off again I would work my *** off studying nutrition with the aim to being a nutritionist. It's a steadily growing industry and positive for the future oh human race.

Not NHS lip service stuff to the growing industry, and not sports / supplement nutrition.

Just proper nutrition, advice on avoiding histamine inducers for people with lichen planus and that kind of thing. Patrick Holford type stuff.

Be rich in health, property price won't stop a heart attack, make you think for yourself about Statins or make you read the Cochrane collaboration.

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Speaking for myself if I was starting off again I would work my *** off studying nutrition with the aim to being a nutritionist. It's a steadily growing industry and positive for the future oh human race.

Not NHS lip service stuff to the growing industry, and not sports / supplement nutrition.

Just proper nutrition, advice on avoiding histamine inducers for people with lichen planus and that kind of thing. Patrick Holford type stuff.

Be rich in health, property price won't stop a heart attack, make you think for yourself about Statins or make you read the Cochrane collaboration.

No need for any of that. Just call yourself an nutritionist. It's a completely unregulated industry. And yes, pandering to people often with eating disorders or some narcissistic desire to be special - is likely to be a growth industry over the next few decades.

Edited by StainlessSteelCat

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You are asking the wrong question, how about:
"What is the value of what I will learn?"
Answer this by comparing the supply/demand ratio for people with these skills.
You haven't said your profession. I work in software and can name a bunch of jobs that are impossible to fill right now regardless of salary.

... what skills/roles are these at the moment?

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I can’t comment on areas I don’t know, but for some time mobile technology has been expanding far faster than developers entering the sector (in terms of users and revenue).

My company has spent the last year struggling to fill a team of (good quality) Android / iOS candidates. That’s for a high paying English speaking engineering role in a country without insane house price growth.

I’d imagine more specialized roles would be even more of a problem.

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No need for any of that. Just call yourself an nutritionist. It's a completely unregulated industry. And yes, pandering to people often with eating disorders or some narcissistic desire to be special - is likely to be a growth industry over the next few decades.

You are pretty fast to imply the government can be trusted on a forum like this. Who do you think should regulate the nutrition industry?

The regulators of the pharmaceutical industry are 100% funded by the pharmaceutical industry. Number 98. of this section of report:

http://www.publications.parliament.uk/pa/cm200405/cmselect/cmhealth/42/4208.htm

quote: The MHRA's activities are 60% funded through licensing fees paid by those seeking marketing approvals and 40% through an annual service fee, also paid by the industry.

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/science/britain-wasted-600m-of-taxpayers-money-on-useless-flu-drugs-stockpiled-by-government-in-case-of-pandemic-9249396.html

I will never disagree with you that selling snake oil in any industry is bad, whether that industry is actually regulated, self-regulated or made to look like it's regulated but by definition isn't.

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You haven't said your profession. I work in software and can name a bunch of jobs that are impossible to fill right now regardless of salary.

nm, you answered.

Edited by DabHand

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