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Email Scam Leading To People Losing Money For House Deposits


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I thought the whole idea of electronic transactions was that you could trace where the money goes.

Nah, someone put money on to my credit card account, bank had no idea who. And they were not bothered by the fact they had no idea who.

They were surprised when I asked for a new card number.

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Don't give out your email address, so the solicitor has to mail you the old fashioned way. I certainly never communicated by email. Pick up the phone, or speak in person at office,

Money transferred by you, out of your own account, to another account, can be very difficult to get back - even if they've made it slightly easier recently.

The phishing could have been on the buyer's email as much as the solicitor's email - or via other techniques. It's time to learn instead of living in fantasy land. Don't CHAPS over vast sums to an account, without having certainty it's the correct account.

The banks and solicitors indemnity policies aren't responsible for your own dumbass actions.

As millions of people do regularly and without thought, he duly replied, sending his Barclays bank account number and sort code.

The email was intercepted by fraudsters. Possibly using technology that “X-rays” millions of emails to identify patterns of data that could contain valuable financial information, the criminals homed in on Mr Lupton’s email – and pounced.

Posing as Mr Lupton, the fraudsters swiftly emailed Perry Hay & Co again – from the same email account – and told it to disregard the previous details and send the money to a different account instead.

http://www.housepricecrash.co.uk/forum/index.php?/topic/205353-hpc-millitant-branch/

Mrs Gabb states: 'Halifax has categorically told me they do not consider themselves to be in any way responsible and TSB will not talk to me due to data protection issues.

'My solicitors at Barnes & Partners seem only concerned to keep reiterating that their computer security is fine and that they are not responsible.

'The police have absolutely no interest in financial recovery, only catching the criminal.'

A spokesman for Halifax explained that this sort of scam is known as 'social engineering'; a non-technical method of intrusion hackers use that relies heavily on human interaction and often involves tricking people into breaking normal security procedures.

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Don't give out your email address, so the solicitor has to mail you the old fashioned way. I certainly never communicated by email. Pick up the phone, or speak in person at office,

I'm in agreement with you btw.

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Always get bank details on paper and even for smaller amounts it's better attached as a bank details sheet PDF which lessens the scope for a typo within the email.

Days of fax were probably more secure where they faxed over bank details. Had a number of cases where money went astray from incorrect bank details but luckily always had a hard copy showing the money was sent where it was instructed to have been.

There's a lot to be said for opening account with the same bank as your solicitor or if you move a lot of money about every major clearing bank. If it's an intra bank account transfer there are two advantages with the bank being able to provide you with a lot more confirmation the money is going where it should be and a lot higher chance of getting it back.

CHAPS is quite(very) arcane with very little information on progress. I seem to think the maximum on faster payments is £100k currently and over that it lapses back on to traditional BACS payment timeframes which might be difficult for putting solicitors in funds for time of the essence property transactions.

Surprised the solicitors didn't recompense to keep this out of the papers as the finger of suspicion clearly points their way.

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The other area I would be looking into if it was my money was evidence that the receiving bank had correctly identified and monitored the account used by the fraudsters. If, for example, it is a student account in the name of a pakistani language student with an average balance of 100 quid, and then gets 300,000 into it that gets bounced out to Pakistan the same day....

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The other area I would be looking into if it was my money was evidence that the receiving bank had correctly identified and monitored the account used by the fraudsters. If, for example, it is a student account in the name of a pakistani language student with an average balance of 100 quid, and then gets 300,000 into it that gets bounced out to Pakistan the same day....

Was Pakistan just a country name, plucked from the air?

In my experience, this is a very very common Mipuri scam.

Experience has taught me never to have any professional//money dealings with Mipuri's.

Edited by spyguy
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The article goes on to say the police recovered the money from an account in west yorkshire, any arrests made? did the solicitors know anyone in the west yorkshire area? perhaps the same kind of people who repeatedly make fraudulent claims for whiplash injuries in the same area in collusion with damage claims solicitors.

just wondering..

Nowt to do with me! :lol:

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Whenever I have to transfer money to a new account, I start with £1, then call to check it's been received before transferring the rest. I've often been accused of going OTT, but reading this story might change that.

funny enough, just transferring a test $100HKD to the wifes new bank account last week for exactly this reason.....

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CHAPS is quite(very) arcane with very little information on progress. I seem to think the maximum on faster payments is £100k currently and over that it lapses back on to traditional BACS payment timeframes which might be difficult for putting solicitors in funds for time of the essence property transactions.

almost everything to do with banks is arcane and archaic and it always seems very hard to get any money back when things go wrong (as I recently experienced with a Lloyds TSB transfer gone bad). If at all possible it is best to avoid bank's systems.

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Whenever I have to transfer money to a new account, I start with £1, then call to check it's been received before transferring the rest. I've often been accused of going OTT, but reading this story might change that.

Yes, I always do that too although usually a tenner.

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Just use a bankers draft for large amounts involved in house purchases. Cost involved but well worth the peace of mind and the document is as good as cash anyway and short of losing it (it still isn't the end of the world) nothing can go wrong.

On-line payments are all right for paying a utility bill but if you use to transfer £££ for a property purchase you need your head examined.

Edited by geezer466
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Just some general stuff-

I rarely install programs or apps from the internet these days. I only visit a handful of trusted sites, and I reinstall Windows to clear the malware/spyware each year or more regularly. I keep my operating system as "virginal" as possible.

If you type in "system configuration" in the start menu search, and then from there look at the startup tab, you'd be amazed at how many malware programs install themselves even after uninstalling the official program! Those buggers connect to the internet each time you log on, slowing your system down! Malwarebytes Anti Malware is free, and pretty good at keeping the system clean.

I 've also learned how to build a PC from scratch, and this computer, I know exactly what is installed, and who it is from. And no, I don't want a free search toolbar!

Edited by 200p
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  • 2 months later...

Money transferred by you, out of your own account, to another account, can be very difficult to get back - even if they've made it slightly easier recently.

The phishing could have been on the buyer's email as much as the solicitor's email - or via other techniques. It's time to learn instead of living in fantasy land. Don't CHAPS over vast sums to an account, without having certainty it's the correct account.

The banks and solicitors indemnity policies aren't responsible for your own dumbass actions.

http://www.housepricecrash.co.uk/forum/index.php?/topic/205353-hpc-millitant-branch/

not your actions...the money was in a clients account.

The couple should not be out of pocket at the end of the day.

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BACS payments are done by a process called "deferred net settlement", I dont know if this includes CHAPS payments or not.

With this process the banks do not make direct tranfers to each other, nor is there any transfer for any individual money movement.

Each bank is given a list of credits and debits for each of its affected accounts, and a total net amount flowing into or out of the bank. With this information the banks adjusts its customer account balances and settles the net inflow/outflow with the BoE.

This possibly makes it more difficult to track an individual transfer than when its made by say the faster payments system.

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not your actions...the money was in a clients account.

The couple should not be out of pocket at the end of the day.

No it was not. (not in the solicitor's client account). The money that went missing was from the payment the couple made from their own bank account.

If you pay some scammer to their sort-code and bank account £299,000, that's your own lookout to make sure you have correct information, imo.

All it required was a telephone call to the solicitor to speak to someone to check the email info (re pay Natwest account instead) was genuine, and to confirm the details (although I would go into the firm and use one with top level indemnity insurance too).

Kate Blakeley and her partner Marco Faes, both 40, lost £299,000 to fraudsters when buying their first house together last July.

The couple had engaged the Beaconsfield branch of regional law firm Hine Solicitors to assist with the purchase. The firm supplied the couple with an initial information pack that contained its Lloyds bank account details, which it later confirmed in an email. Throughout the purchasing process the firm communicated with the couple primarily via email.

Ms Blakeley and Mr Faes, who both work in communications, exchanged on their £965,000 home in Beaconsfield, Buckinghamshire, and were due to complete on Monday, July 21. Shortly before then they received an email from Hine saying that its Lloyds bank account was being audited, so the couple needed to transfer their funds to the firm’s NatWest account.

Wanting to make sure the request was genuine, Mr Faes replied asking for confirmation of their unique client ID number. He received a reply with the correct details and so, on the Thursday before completion, the couple went to their local Barclays bank and transferred £299,000 to the NatWest account.

But alarm bells rang the next day when they received a call from Hine saying the money had not arrived. The couple rang Barclays, which said that the transfer had gone through.

Edited by Venger
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When I bought my house, I transfered 10k at a time (to avoid the fee) and did do one small transfer to check it was reaching the right people.

Yeah, I'll do a test with a few pence and confirm the amount received before I transfer anything over about £100. Crazy to think that people will risk vast sums of their own money without even doing a basic check first. I literally can't comprehend people who would behave do this.

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