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People Who Watch Tv All The Time

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Watching a lot of TV has been a problem for people for decades of course (they even wrote a song about it a quarter of a century ago

) but in recent times I've noticed people I know doing it a lot more, like for hours on end, day after month after year. Living their life by schedules (odd in a digital age!) and not emerging or going outside for days on end. The problem now of course is on demand, recordable telivision, which makes it so easy to avoid your problems and ostrich yourself into the TV.

Anyone else know people like this? Literally watching TV for hours and hours until months and months go by?

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My Mum is like this - but perhaps justifiable given she is no very mobile at the moment and her eyesight is not good enough for reading.

I've found myself watching less telly, and it's nearly always planned. I doubt I watch more than a hour a day nowadays.

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I see the adverts for Sky with the endless box-sets on demand. And I think "it's going to have to be truly outstanding for me to make that sort of time commitment".

Long-running shows which have managed this are 'The X-Files' and 'Breaking Bad' which have a writer (Vince Gilligan) in common. Those which have failed include 'Game of Thrones', 'Lost', 'The Sopranos' and 'Dexter' where I gave up fairly early on. They all have qualities, and I might watch if they were 6 episodes each, but I don't have time to indulge in so many soap-operas.

Though I do get some sense, without meaning to be condescending to anyone but picking up the implication in the ads "Your mates are up to season 4 and you haven't even started season 1" that these things are "topics of conversation" and therefore without seeing them there is the potential for social exclusion.

I wonder how good so many of these factory-line ten-a-penny long series are. But then if they keep people happy I suppose it doesn't matter. It's not as if I'm studying for a PHD at the expense of watching TV.

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I'm finding I can't really watch TV any more. Check out this book:

FourArgumentsForTheEliminationOfTelevisi

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Arguments-Elimination-Television-Jerry-Mander/dp/0688082742

His other great work:

In the Absence of the Sacred

http://www.amazon.com/In-Absence-Sacred-Technology-Survival/dp/0871565099

Won`t be news to too many on here, from it`s inception TV would have had "those who seek to control" rubbing their hands in glee.

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Anyone else know people like this? Literally watching TV for hours and hours until months and months go by?

The Simpsons

Homer: It'll be great to see the old gang again. Potsie, Ralph Malph, the Fonz.

Marge: That wasn't you, that was "Happy Days"!

Homer: No, they weren't all happy days. Like the time Pinky Tuscadero crashed her motorcycle, or the night I lost all my money to those card sharks and my dad Tom Bosley had to get it back.

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I don't wish to be contrarian, and it may be mostly self-selection of the people I know, but I can't think of anybody I know like that these days. I have known people (may have been myself) like that in the past.

The change seems to be the move to freeview, ease of recording, and on demand meaning that for most people the schedules have dissolved. As a teenager Thursday night was stay-in TV night (Blackadder, Top of the Pops etc.) and we'd all discuss it at school the next day.

This freedom from schedules means people do seem to lead more balanced lives than they did.

Of course you still get the Britain's Got Talent discussions but I am excused as people know that I don't have a telly.

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"Check out this book" you say, and then present us with a Youtube. Oh the irony!

I'm finding I can't really watch TV any more. Check out this book:

FourArgumentsForTheEliminationOfTelevisi

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Arguments-Elimination-Television-Jerry-Mander/dp/0688082742

His other great work:

In the Absence of the Sacred

http://www.amazon.com/In-Absence-Sacred-Technology-Survival/dp/0871565099

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I see the adverts for Sky with the endless box-sets on demand. And I think "it's going to have to be truly outstanding for me to make that sort of time commitment".

Long-running shows which have managed this are 'The X-Files' and 'Breaking Bad' which have a writer (Vince Gilligan) in common. Those which have failed include 'Game of Thrones', 'Lost', 'The Sopranos' and 'Dexter' where I gave up fairly early on. They all have qualities, and I might watch if they were 6 episodes each, but I don't have time to indulge in so many soap-operas.

Lost, hmmm, the error of not starting out with a clear idea of where you are going. The writers strike didn't help though.

These days I wait for the series to be over then watch it, like Breaking Bad. Don't want to get caught up in a good show being cancelled with no resolution. I've got better stuff to talk about around the water cooler than TV, anyway I work with geeks and they are barely capable of communication beyond the level of chimps.

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I don't watch TV.

But I spend hours glued to a computer screen instead, so I can't be any better.

You are self-selecting your viewing away from the whims of schedulers and programmers which makes you better IMO.

Unless you mean you watch no films, programmes or videos altogether which is awesome and something I won't get to and don't think I want to really.

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My other half is a youtube addict, she spends 90% of her free time watching youtube stuff - TV shows on demand mostly.

I would actually say it's something of a problem for her, as she doesn't do things she needs to do because she's too busy youtubing.

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My Mum is like this - but perhaps justifiable given she is no very mobile at the moment and her eyesight is not good enough for reading.

I've found myself watching less telly, and it's nearly always planned. I doubt I watch more than a hour a day nowadays.

I don't get why women of a certain age can still sit watching all the soaps, For one thing the characters are about half my age these days, the story lines are cliché and all been done before. Watching East Enders or Coronation Street these days would be torture.

Actually most programmes, especially reality ones, seem to be cliché and I just have a boredom threshold.

I'm really just stuck with the news, Daily Politics and watching repeats of Morse, Frost etc. Why I don't have the same boredom threshold with these repeats God knows...nostalgia for the time probably.

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Lost, hmmm, the error of not starting out with a clear idea of where you are going. The writers strike didn't help though.

These days I wait for the series to be over then watch it, like Breaking Bad. Don't want to get caught up in a good show being cancelled with no resolution. I've got better stuff to talk about around the water cooler than TV, anyway I work with geeks and they are barely capable of communication beyond the level of chimps.

I, initially, enjoyed watching Lost but it is one of the reasons why I'm not a fan of these American shows now. They started off with plans to make around four seasons (series?!), then when it took off and they realised it was popular they were planning to do something like eight or ten, then came the writers strike and the figures start to dip so they end up with six. What I want to know is where does all of this extra material come from and go to when these decisions are made? You're either admitting to padding out and/or cutting major parts out of it to compress it down. I think I'd rather have something that has a clear goal and end-point and is self-contained, not changed to suit whatever happens at the time.

I've previously said, and I stand by it, that some of the American series are no more than glorified soap operas with massive budgets. They just run and run and run as long as the viewing figures are there. Look at Prison Break. They break out, they break in, they break out again, viewing figures drop, they cancel it!

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I, initially, enjoyed watching Lost but it is one of the reasons why I'm not a fan of these American shows now. They started off with plans to make around four seasons (series?!), then when it took off and they realised it was popular they were planning to do something like eight or ten, then came the writers strike and the figures start to dip so they end up with six. What I want to know is where does all of this extra material come from and go to when these decisions are made? You're either admitting to padding out and/or cutting major parts out of it to compress it down. I think I'd rather have something that has a clear goal and end-point and is self-contained, not changed to suit whatever happens at the time.

I've previously said, and I stand by it, that some of the American series are no more than glorified soap operas with massive budgets. They just run and run and run as long as the viewing figures are there. Look at Prison Break. They break out, they break in, they break out again, viewing figures drop, they cancel it!

I quite like Dexter but recognise that it is exactly this. You can pretty much hear the writers thinking: "One more series. Right, find another unsuitable man for Deb, introduce a new complex serial killer to anchor the series, bring in one or two new characters, try to make some of the main characters less like breathing cartoons, find some new personal crisis to give Dexter an inner dialogue".

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"Check out this book" you say, and then present us with a Youtube. Oh the irony!

I take your point, but there was a link to the book as well, which I read (along with 'absence of the sacred') before the internet existed, let alone YT

Is YouTube even TV? I'm not sure it satisfies all of Mander's objections.

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No TV but I have Netflix.

Watched a series 'Sense8'. Some dialogue was maybe relevant to this thread. Guy living in a hovel has a 42" TV. Woman tells him about visiting a place in Bombay that had no beds but a huge TV. Guy says 'A bed keeps you in the slum. A TV takes you out of it.'

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I take your point, but there was a link to the book as well, which I read (along with 'absence of the sacred') before the internet existed, let alone YT

Is YouTube even TV? I'm not sure it satisfies all of Mander's objections.

I presume you've read 'Amusing Ourselves to Death'? If not, I recommend it highly. It has the same McLuhan-inspired 'the medium is the message' theme as Mander's work but I find Postman to be funnier than Mander, though Mander definitely has a funnier name.

Postman's take is not that intelligent discourse is absolutely impossible through a medium like television but that it's not a natural fit. 'Dancing girls' fit much better and producers and consumers of television will naturally gravitate towards them.

Postman also suggested that television is responsible for the demise of the notion of childhood, which had its heydey from the 1850s to 1950s. Prior to TV, adult discourse was largely hidden from children in the form of the written word.

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I visited a friend not seen for quite a few years.......when I arrived the TV was on, a very large flat screen one, not the one they had the last time I visited......not a lot wrong in that you may say, but the TV stayed on in the background.....NOBODY was watching it....NOBODY turned it off.

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I rarely watch live television. I have so many films I can watch what I want when I want, without adverts for sofas, betting or Wonga.

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I don't wish to be contrarian, and it may be mostly self-selection of the people I know, but I can't think of anybody I know like that these days. I have known people (may have been myself) like that in the past.

The change seems to be the move to freeview, ease of recording, and on demand meaning that for most people the schedules have dissolved. As a teenager Thursday night was stay-in TV night (Blackadder, Top of the Pops etc.) and we'd all discuss it at school the next day.

This freedom from schedules means people do seem to lead more balanced lives than they did.

Of course you still get the Britain's Got Talent discussions but I am excused as people know that I don't have a telly.

I seriously doubt that, many pay out half their wages for shelter and spend most of the day attached to some sort of media device, pre-internet most watched some TV in the evening when they had done a days activity that probably didn`t include being attached to a media device?

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I visited a friend not seen for quite a few years.......when I arrived the TV was on, a very large flat screen one, not the one they had the last time I visited......not a lot wrong in that you may say, but the TV stayed on in the background.....NOBODY was watching it....NOBODY turned it off.

You also get people that have pseudo sh1te like Classic Fm or Radio 4 on the whole time whilst not really listening to it.

I do occasionally watch broadcast TV whilst I'm eating. There seems to be a suggestion that not watching TV is in some way virtuous, which I don't really see. I do certainly agree that you don't learn much from TV even things like documentaries that are seemingly designed (badly) to impart knowledge.

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I take your point, but there was a link to the book as well, which I read (along with 'absence of the sacred') before the internet existed, let alone YT

Is YouTube even TV? I'm not sure it satisfies all of Mander's objections.

It's not dissimilar to a form of public access television, they had in the States, but there was never really anything like it over here.

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I don't get why women of a certain age can still sit watching all the soaps, For one thing the characters are about half my age these days, the story lines are cliché and all been done before. Watching East Enders or Coronation Street these days would be torture.

Actually most programmes, especially reality ones, seem to be cliché and I just have a boredom threshold.

I'm really just stuck with the news, Daily Politics and watching repeats of Morse, Frost etc. Why I don't have the same boredom threshold with these repeats God knows...nostalgia for the time probably.

I can't stand any of the soaps and consequently they're never on in my home. My 13 year old son had to watch 5 episodes of Eastenders this week as part of his English homework. He found it unbearable. I can't understand why this would even be a good subject to cover in school.

I visited a friend not seen for quite a few years.......when I arrived the TV was on, a very large flat screen one, not the one they had the last time I visited......not a lot wrong in that you may say, but the TV stayed on in the background.....NOBODY was watching it....NOBODY turned it off.

Does my 'ead in. My MIL is like this when we visit. Just turn the frigging thing off.

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If I go out with friends I put my phone in my pocket and ignore it unless it rings and even then I filter. It amazes me people have it glued to their hand and check it constantly.

The same applies to tv - if visitors turn up I switch off the tv - everything is recorded anyway.

However that's where my good form ends.

I have an addiction to television.

I record EVERYTHING of interest and never miss anything I like.

My SKY+ planner can be five months back but everything on there will be worked through methodically, whole series are watched chronologically, whether what I consider heavyweight ie Game Of Thrones, Banshee, Hannibal, Fortitude, Breaking Bad, Dexter, The Sopranos, The Shield, Boardwalk Empire or considered cartoon lightweights such as Hawaii 5-0, CSI, Criminal Minds, Forever, Sleepy Hollow, Persons Of Interest, Gotham, Blue Bloods...

Then there are the music programmes on BBC4, Jools etc, the various BBC and C4 documentaries, the odd ITV or C5 documentaries, the sports I follow and I always record the news bulletins, and the Sky and BBC late night paper reviews. The fillers on satellite like Counting Cars, Pawn Stars...

I'm absorbed by the television I like.

The weird thing is I NEVER sit in front of a tv Marshall McLuhan casual viewing head buried in the sand. Never watch any soaps and most strangely compared to most of my friends actually spend LESS time watching tv - hence my backlog.

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