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Turned Out Nice Again

What Does A 10 Bob Note Buy You In 2015?

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I'm sure a tranny in a striped skirt is pretty cheap.

OTOH I'm old enough to remember being bloody thrilled by a 10' Postal Order from a distant aunt.

ED: 10/?

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I recall the days when £10 would get you the bus into town, a chart LP and a single or two, dinner (such as it was) in McDonalds and still have some change.

These days 50p gets you a DVD in a charity shop. If it's relatively recent, then half a DVD, or alternatively if it's Max Bygraves, a couple of LPs.

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Ah you are suffering from 'anchoring', the tendency to think that money keeps the same value as you get older...

Ten bob still gets a few things. A nice bar of Sainsbury's value chocolate is only about 35p or so; there are lots of other good 'value' products in supermarkets for less than 50p. Go to a car boot sale or a non-greedy national chain charity shop and you're laughing.

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As per the other thread 200g of peanuts...would have cost considerably more in real terms in the 1960s. Would have been an 8oz packet back then, so a bit of shrinkflation.

Well actually it would have been a KP xmas gift tin and probably cost about 8 shillings. Everybody was thin because there was no such thing as mega bags.

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6658262327_a09a53bf88_z.jpg

1970:

A pint of beer + a bag of fish & chips + bus fare home. Alternatively, stay home and smoke 50 cigarettes.

2015:

1 poxy 'Pink Lady' apple (only if reduced):

IMG_20150610_181607_001.jpg

OR

A piss in Victoria Station:

IMG_20150528_225834.jpg

I always use the expression having a laugh when the supermarket proffers a discounted apple for 50p.

Now five loaves of bread when they are getting desperate at the end of the day at 10p a pop...clearly no longer having a laugh.

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About 5 minutes labour. Bargain!

Or conversely one can exchange a few mins labour for 10 bob today. Compared to how much labour in 1970? A couple of hours? more?

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About 5 minutes labour. Bargain!

Or conversely one can exchange a few mins labour for 10 bob today. Compared to how much labour in 1970? A couple of hours? more?

Could've been more than a day's work at low pay.

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I have a crispy ten shilling note in an old wallet somewhere. I'm not sure where I got it. I was not old enough to go into a bank.

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I have a crispy ten shilling note in an old wallet somewhere. I'm not sure where I got it. I was not old enough to go into a bank.

There was one in my Mother in laws purse, God knows how forty five years after it had been withdrawn, she is now in a home with dementia.

Got it in on the wall unit with an old pyramid phone 1935. Like old things.

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As it happens, I did attend a boot sale last Sunday and found a few rubies in the dust.

Best scores were:

- a mini screwdriver + a big spool of solder @ 50p the pair

- a high quality french paring knife @ 10p

- 200 old-fashioned safety razor blades @ 50p

and for my lad one of these (but no ammo) @ £1:

Untitled-2.png

I don't recall regular boot sales even existing in 1970

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As it happens, I did attend a boot sale last Sunday and found a few rubies in the dust.

Best scores were:

- a mini screwdriver + a big spool of solder @ 50p

- a high quality paring knife @ 10p

- 200 old-fashioned safety razor blades @ 50p

and for my lad one of these (but no ammo) @ £1:

Untitled-2.png

One advantage of living in a country with too much stuff, its second hand value becomes close to zero.

There was only a tiny second hand market in 1970, stuff was kept until it fell to bits.

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Could've been more than a day's work at low pay.

I dare say you're right. Imagine that. Wiki tells me that the avg wkly wage in 1970 was just £32, so well under £1 an hour. That's the average. Shocking.

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I dare say you're right. Imagine that. Wiki tells me that the avg wkly wage in 1970 was just £32, so well under £1 an hour. That's the average. Shocking.

Not really, my folks bought their 3 bedroom 2 reception terraced house in 1969 for £5500 or so, so that £32 a week would translate to circa £1500 a year. 3.5 time annual salary, so a bit of deposit, a single working man like my dad and my mum doing a bit of shop work for extra money could buy a family home and have me.

That same house, that I'm now typing this from is now worth costs circa £850,000

That is what is truly shocking

Mental

sorry for going all House prices and the Economy/derail

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Living in Banstead Surrey, it was a big treat for me and a couple of mates of about 12 years old to get a Red Bus Rover in the Summer holidays for the day and travel all over London. Incredible on a number of levels.

What an adventure! I did that! I lived in Coulsdon. My uncle lived in Banstead. :huh:

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The other day in my local Sue Ryder shop I picked up a 1970s paperback called 'Tips and Wrinkles' for 50p or 10/- in the old money.

It's one of those books full of Viz top-tips (but sensible ones). I estimate the advice therein has already saved me more than the amount I paid for the book.

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It goes quite a long way too at the bread counter at the end of the day, have been using a desserted rural supermarket just lately so no crowds. Can usually get large bloomers. etc for four bob each for the freezer, so two and a half large luxury loaves. Still slighly more than the three bob loaf of 1973 and probably two bob when the ten shilling note was phased out.

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ninebob.jpg

When I was at Public Approved School my Aunt Agatha would send me 9 Bob notes, Enough for a slap-up meal or a cheap whore!

I had to check up on that...... as I thought nothing so bent as a 9 bob note, but then I don't really rememeber the ten shilling note either. The most I got was a threpenny bit for the school tuck shop.

Milk comes to mind, 49p a litre. When I emailed Tesco to complain they had put the price up to 65p I got a phone call and lecture on British farmers. Stuff that, Lidl for me now.

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