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Eddie_George

Irvine Welsh: 'i Was A Heroin Addict – Then I Found Buy-To-Let'

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LOL!

How did you turn your financial situation around?
My big break was falling out of the top deck of a bus when it toppled over in a traffic accident. I was in Scotland for a cup game and the bus was involved in a collision. I received £2,000 in compensation. If it had happened 18 months before, I’d have spent the lot on drugs, but instead I secured a mortgage on an £8,000 flat in Hackney and sold it for £15,000 18 months later.
I then bought a house for £17,000 in south-east London and, again, sold it for £52,000 18 months later. In three years my working capital went from zero to £40,000. I’d shown no entrepreneurial skills whatsoever; I was just exceptionally lucky to be living in London during the Eighties' property boom.
From then on I became a postcode sociologist, buying flats in emerging areas. You could see the gentrification starting in Camden and slowly creeping through Islington and Hackney.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/finance/personalfinance/fameandfortune/11653606/Irvine-Welsh-I-was-a-heroin-addict-then-I-found-buy-to-let.html

Edited by Eddie_George

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There's a reference to it in Trainspotting (the film, don't think it's in the book) when Renton becomes a letting agent.

"It was a time when any fool could make money and plenty of fools did."

Edited by Will!

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The irony here is that once the current govt has finished selling off the housing trust property (via RTB), both of these types of addict wont have a roof over their heads when they hit hard times!

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"I then bought a house for £17,000 in south-east London and, again, sold it for £52,000 18 months later. In three years my working capital went from zero to £40,000. Id shown no entrepreneurial skills whatsoever; I was just exceptionally lucky to be living in London during the Eighties' property boom."

Honest and fair comment

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"I then bought a house for £17,000 in south-east London and, again, sold it for £52,000 18 months later. In three years my working capital went from zero to £40,000. Id shown no entrepreneurial skills whatsoever; I was just exceptionally lucky to be living in London during the Eighties' property boom."

Honest and fair comment

But then he become a 'propertiee expert'!

From then on I became a postcode sociologist, buying flats in emerging areas. You could see the gentrification starting in Camden and slowly creeping through Islington and Hackney.

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"I then bought a house for £17,000 in south-east London and, again, sold it for £52,000 18 months later. In three years my working capital went from zero to £40,000. Id shown no entrepreneurial skills whatsoever; I was just exceptionally lucky to be living in London during the Eighties' property boom."

Honest and fair comment

I'd agree if he hadn't started banging on about being an f-ing sociologist, up until then he was being honest!

Awa' an bile yer heid Irvine!

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Children can do BTL

Drug Addicts can do BTL

My pet dog can do BTL

Isn't it time you grew a pair and get into BTL?

---

I feel that might be some catchy slogan, like this:

Untitled.png

Edited by 200p

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I'd agree if he hadn't started banging on about being an f-ing sociologist, up until then he was being honest!

Awa' an bile yer heid Irvine!

I wonder if any of these property location sociologists understand that areas can also get worst? The same as populations can also go down! Lets all leave the UK and its overpriced housing!

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"I then bought a house for £17,000 in south-east London and, again, sold it for £52,000 18 months later. In three years my working capital went from zero to £40,000. Id shown no entrepreneurial skills whatsoever; I was just exceptionally lucky to be living in London during the Eighties' property boom."

Honest and fair comment

His gain was precisely the same HPI that priced some of us out. Permanently.

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Basically, a parasite who's only redeeming quality is Trainspotting.

He preyed on the rest of us while an addict, got lucky claiming compensation (from who?) which he then leveraged into a succession of property deals which helped drive up prices for the rest of us.

Cheers mate.

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I loved Trainspotting (the book), and some of his earlier short stories - but seriously....since the late 90s all he's been doing is writing the same novel, over and over and over - but slightly worse each time. The last book I read of his was The Bedroom Secrets of the Master Chefs - really embarrasingly bad. Perhaps I should just see him as a BTL LL who does a bit of writing on the side.

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Children can do BTL

Drug Addicts can do BTL

My pet dog can do BTL

Isn't it time you grew a pair and get into BTL?

---

I feel that might be some catchy slogan, like this:

Untitled.png

:lol::lol::lol:

How about....ARE YOU READY TO GO BALLS DEEP IN DEBT AND HASSLE?....THEN BTL IS FOR YOU......GROW YOUR VOIDS AS YOU SINK INTO ADDICTION....AND GET A FREE SIGN UP TO THE MSE PROPERTY DISCUSSION FOR YOUR TROUBLE.....

Edited by dances with sheeple

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I loved Trainspotting (the book), and some of his earlier short stories - but seriously....since the late 90s all he's been doing is writing the same novel, over and over and over - but slightly worse each time. The last book I read of his was The Bedroom Secrets of the Master Chefs - really embarrasingly bad. Perhaps I should just see him as a BTL LL who does a bit of writing on the side.

When his latest output is called "A decent Ride" you know that he lost it in the 90`s, if not before. The only words of his that I have ever read right through are in the introduction to a recent edition of Last Exit To Brooklyn, and it is a good intro, pretty passionate, and seems to point to where he got his inspiration for Trainspotting (street life in Edinburgh can be just as tortured as Brooklyn or anywhere else if you can get it out in words that connect with people)Tried reading Trainspotting once, got through about ten sentences before I gave it up, movie is one of the greats though.

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Here's a great review of The Bedroom Secrets of the Master Chefs - it's actually WORSE (in my view) than the review states it is:-

http://www.nytimes.com/2006/08/20/books/review/20welsh.html?_r=0

Welsh is a like a number of writers that seem to become parodies of themselves - maybe it's the nature of the work - sign a contract to write 10 novels and get paid a load of money for it - whether you have a lot, a little, or even no passion to write....when your first book was written for free and with full reserves of passion for the art.

Edited by canbuywontbuy

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