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Uk Banks Won't Face Tougher Regulation....

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LOL!

I wasn't aware there were any tough regulations in place anyway.

Luckily the actual crash is imminent.

Edited by Errol

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They are supposed to be regulated by 2018 are they not?

Why is it I think we'll be leaving Europe in 2017.

I see today Cameron has spoken out again corruption in organisations and governments, he's got some brass neck.

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Gulliver will be relieved. he can replenish his Panamian offshore bonus account now.

Fact is Osborne needs to dump a ton of Lloyds & Royal Bank of Sh1te equity onto UK pension funds the market to "pay down the debt" or something and since he needs to somehow also find some growth to replace his march of the makers, banking is his last resort.

his entire 5 yr plan is predicated on rising household debt = giving the banks their head for a housing boom.

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They are supposed to be regulated by 2018 are they not?

Why is it I think we'll be leaving Europe in 2017.

I see today Cameron has spoken out again corruption in organisations and governments, he's got some brass neck.

The entire establishment is for keeping us in. There isn't a cat in hells chance we are leaving.

The Scots referendum was the learning curve to see how well they can rig a referendum.

Besides Basel III is global regulation so it won't matter if we are in the EU or not.

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Gulliver will be relieved. he can replenish his Panamian offshore bonus account now.

Fact is Osborne needs to dump a ton of Lloyds & Royal Bank of Sh1te equity onto UK pension funds the market to "pay down the debt" or something and since he needs to somehow also find some growth to replace his march of the makers, banking is his last resort.

his entire 5 yr plan is predicated on rising household debt = giving the banks their head for a housing boom.

Is his plan needing mortgage debt to rise or for unsecured debt to go through the roof, as clearly people can't get mortgages any more due to MMR as houses are too expensive.

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Is his plan needing mortgage debt to rise or for unsecured debt to go through the roof, as clearly people can't get mortgages any more due to MMR as houses are too expensive.

OBR forecast based on Osbornes budget forecast for growth, govt. spending and other sectoral balances. Its basically mortgage debt. Ofc Osbornes plan could turn out to be nonsense. MMR/macro-pru is a moveable feast.

Household_debt_to__3127662b.jpg

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OBR forecast based on Osbornes budget forecast for growth, govt. spending and other sectoral balances. Its basically mortgage debt. Ofc Osbornes plan could turn out to be nonsense. MMR/macro-pru is a moveable feast.

Household_debt_to__3127662b.jpg

I remember seeing this and thinking why no journalist, member of the opposition etc... is speaking out against it.

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LOL!

I wasn't aware there were any tough regulations in place anyway.

Luckily the actual crash is imminent.

Since the crisis, there has been an enormous amount of regulation. In particular:

- Liquidity rules (BIPRU in the UK, being replaced by LCR)

- Basel III rules, covering capital (roughly double the previous requirements), liquidity and funding (LCR and NSFR), leverage ratio (a traditional simple banking requirement)

- Bail-in requriements (TLAC and MREL)

- Retail/wholesale split (ICB and Liikannen)

- Bonus caps

The rules and regulation have changed the business of banking significantly. I think that Osborne means that he is drawing a line under new regulation. The rules imposed to-date are quite far-reaching.

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Since the crisis, there has been an enormous amount of regulation. In particular:

- Liquidity rules (BIPRU in the UK, being replaced by LCR)

- Basel III rules, covering capital (roughly double the previous requirements), liquidity and funding (LCR and NSFR), leverage ratio (a traditional simple banking requirement)

- Bail-in requriements (TLAC and MREL)

- Retail/wholesale split (ICB and Liikannen)

- Bonus caps

The rules and regulation have changed the business of banking significantly. I think that Osborne means that he is drawing a line under new regulation. The rules imposed to-date are quite far-reaching.

Isn't it fair to say that the Basel framework, and thus Basel III, is supra-national and that the Governor of the Bank of England is the UK participant, hence, in the case of regulatory rules coming out of the Bank for International Settlement and the Basel capital accords, Osborne doesn't have the power to make the call as to when enough is enough?

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Everybody in the country is queuing up to be "hit" just half as hard as the banks have been.

Chance would be a fine thing.

Edited by billybong

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It's starting to pan out very like the 80s/90s economic collapse.

Many many "promises" about how there was going to be tougher regulation etc - so that it would never happen again.

Result - another economic collapse and more promises that get reneged on again.

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Isn't it fair to say that the Basel framework, and thus Basel III, is supra-national and that the Governor of the Bank of England is the UK participant, hence, in the case of regulatory rules coming out of the Bank for International Settlement and the Basel capital accords, Osborne doesn't have the power to make the call as to when enough is enough?

The Basel accords are international agreements and only get implemented locally. But Basel II was never implemented in the USA, so there are limitations to the authority of the agreements.

It is clear that the UK was very influencial in getting the standards negotiated and was a forerunner in certain areas, such as liquidity standards.

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It's starting to pan out very like the 80s/90s economic collapse.

Many many "promises" about how there was going to be tougher regulation etc - so that it would never happen again.

Result - another economic collapse and more promises that get reneged on again.

But there is tougher regulation and it has been introduced.

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But there is tougher regulation and it has been introduced.

and still they launder, still they lie on the balance sheets, still they lie on the loans, still they manipulate markets illegally.

Bankers should go to work in handcuffs, not allowed access to each other, never allowed to fill out a form without a chaperone.

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I should have posted on here my prediction that osborne would fight the 2018 banker regulation.

That man is not working for the people of this country IMHO, but the bankers.

General election has come and gone and we still have this man in control of the countrys finances, what a disaster.

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The thing with banks......for many thousands of years people could live quite happily without them.....they have created a system where people now feel they require them to exist in the modern world we now live in......the less of a reliance we have the freer we become....

Debt brings with it less time.....debtless brings with it more free time.

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