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Ex-Whitehall Chief Criticises Right-To-Buy Housing Policy

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http://www.theguardian.com/politics/2015/may/30/right-to-buy-ex-whitehall-chief-kerslake

Now what they dont tell you, years ago these housing associations purchased the properties from local councils a a very cheap price, so they should be sold on to tennants at a discount.

Also this guy that said its wrong has vested interests in housing associations specially peabody trust wink wink. Selling off these properties would mean loss of income, reduction in earnings and less government subsidy per property that they receive each year, now you can see why they dont want to sell it, there wages would have to reduce.

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Communities secretary Greg Clark will this week tell local authorities to let go of surplus and redundant sites to allow new homes to be constructed, and will set a target for them to release enough land to build 150,000 homes by 2020.

So they intend to build no more new homes a year than they did during the last parliament and for the past 6/7 years. Time wasters wasting people's time.

Edited by billybong

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http://www.theguardian.com/politics/2015/may/30/right-to-buy-ex-whitehall-chief-kerslake

Now what they dont tell you, years ago these housing associations purchased the properties from local councils a a very cheap price, so they should be sold on to tennants at a discount.

Also this guy that said its wrong has vested interests in housing associations specially peabody trust wink wink. Selling off these properties would mean loss of income, reduction in earnings and less government subsidy per property that they receive each year, now you can see why they dont want to sell it, there wages would have to reduce.

I had a thought about The Peabody Trust - perhaps someone with a better legal standing can answer this.

Is the Peabody Trust still a trust in the legal sense? And if it is, what does government forcing a trust to sell its assets mean for trusts in general?

Doesn't it set a dangerous precedent? It occurs to me that many of Cameron's old Etonian mates probably live off either partially or wholly off trust funds, and government meddling with their asset holdings is probably not something they'll be keen on. I guess this kind of thing can be partially negated by holding trusts off-shore, but could holding property in the UK become an increased risk for these entities?

Anyway, just a thought.

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I had a thought about The Peabody Trust - perhaps someone with a better legal standing can answer this.

Is the Peabody Trust still a trust in the legal sense? And if it is, what does government forcing a trust to sell its assets mean for trusts in general?

Doesn't it set a dangerous precedent? It occurs to me that many of Cameron's old Etonian mates probably live off either partially or wholly off trust funds, and government meddling with their asset holdings is probably not something they'll be keen on. I guess this kind of thing can be partially negated by holding trusts off-shore, but could holding property in the UK become an increased risk for these entities?

Anyway, just a thought.

its just a housing association like the others.

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There was another recent Guardian article with a paragraph stating that RTB should be extended to private tenants.

If Housing Assoc tenants are likely to get RTB then it only seems fair that private tenants like myself also get a bite of the cherry. With a 50% discount! ;)

Edited by MattW

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There was another recent Guardian article with a paragraph stating that RTB should be extended to private tenants.

If Housing Assoc tenants are likely to get RTB then it only seems fair that private tenants like myself also get a bite of the cherry. With a 50% discount! ;)

But then the state would be paying the other 50% at market value to the landlord so no doubt they'd be interested.

Council houses were kind of theirs to flog off, these houses are effectively privately owned. Only the small govt, free market Tory party could come up with such a policy.

Dave was outbidding everyone prior to the election, he made Ed look like he had the essence of sound financial policy about him ... this will cost £££££££££ in court costs alone.

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/home-news/lawyers-question-david-camerons-pledge-to-offer-right-to-buy-to-housingassociation-tenants-10286790.html

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There was another recent Guardian article with a paragraph stating that RTB should be extended to private tenants.

If Housing Assoc tenants are likely to get RTB then it only seems fair that private tenants like myself also get a bite of the cherry. With a 50% discount! ;)

most of the housing associations stock was given to them by the council at a knock down price.

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