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RichM

Attitudes About Owning A Home Changing?

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Young people's hearts no longer in homeownership, Guardian, 13-12-2005

Quite interesting. Maybe us young 'uns are more concerned about seeing the world, doing turtle conservation in Madagascar and going clubbing in Ibiza.

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Aya napa, aya napa, aya napa, skill

Un cha un cha un cha un cha un cha un cha un cha

Un cha un cha un cha un cha un cha un cha un cha

Un cha un cha un cha un cha un cha un cha un cha

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Aciiiiiiiiiid, aciiiiiiiid, aciiiiiiiiid, aciiiiiiiiiiiid

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You're no good for me, I don't need nobody, don't need no one, that's no good for me...

Un cha un cha un cha un cha un cha un cha un cha

Un cha un cha un cha un cha un cha un cha un cha

etc etc all night, before buying a kebab then being sick

Edited by RichM

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Young people's hearts no longer in homeownership, Guardian, 13-12-2005

Quite interesting. Maybe us young 'uns are more concerned about seeing the world, doing turtle conservation in Madagascar and going clubbing in Ibiza.

Un cha un cha un cha un cha un cha un cha un cha

Aya napa, aya napa, aya napa, skill

Un cha un cha un cha un cha un cha un cha un cha

Un cha un cha un cha un cha un cha un cha un cha

Un cha un cha un cha un cha un cha un cha un cha

Un cha un cha un cha un cha un cha un cha un cha

Aciiiiiiiiiid, aciiiiiiiid, aciiiiiiiiid, aciiiiiiiiiiiid

Un cha un cha un cha un cha un cha un cha un cha

Un cha un cha un cha un cha un cha un cha un cha

Un cha un cha un cha un cha un cha un cha un cha

Un cha un cha un cha un cha un cha un cha un cha

You're no good for me, I don't need nobody, don't need no one, that's no good for me...

Un cha un cha un cha un cha un cha un cha un cha

Un cha un cha un cha un cha un cha un cha un cha

etc etc all night, before buying a kebab then being sick

:lol:

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Well you've got to ask yourself if 'young' people are right to spend their money on seeing the world, nights out and Bacardi Breezers.

Let's face it if you take the chance of home ownership away from them by pushing prices way too high of course they are going to spend their money elsewhere.

Who can blame them ? When you get to 70 the chances are you will remember saving turtles in Madagascar or learning to dive in Thailand. Doubt that you will remember that interesting mortgage payment you made in 2006!

As someone who has STR'd I don't miss home ownership and maybe the question all those hellbent on getting on the 'ladder' should ask themselves is 'just how much of my happiness in life depends on me owning my own home'?

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= = =

STRANGE.

They have Nothing to say about the cycle in house prices:

An empty analysis of someone unable to think laterally

But that's true of most articles talking about the decline of the first time buyer. Seems to be gospel truth that most would-be FTBs are priced out and alway will be. Yet this means hardly anyone one will ever buy a home in the future (unless NuLabour churn out a few thousand shacks for 50% shared ownership).

Again, these articles tend to come up with straw-clutching reasons why young people aren't buying - they don't want to committ, want to do the inca trail, want to binge drink/buy iPods instead.

A more honest line to take would be: 'FTBs are sitting out the housing bubble and finding other ways of fulfilling themselves beyond clinging to a hopeless dream or enslaving themselves to huge, probably fraudulent, mortgage.'

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There is also a difference between a repayment mortgage that sits fairly comfortably within your monthly expences.. and a £180,000 interest only mortgage against a 2 bed flat in Stabbsville.

One is moving towards responsible home ownership.

The other is financial suicide with the only guaranted result being that you will not own the home. Just debt against it.. fact.. you have to be a little odd to do that.

Perhaps young people learnt more about the world at Uni then we all think.

As for the rest, lace Barcardi Breezers with Bromide.. That should sort out the Chav issue

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Young people's hearts no longer in homeownership, Guardian, 13-12-2005

Quite interesting. Maybe us young 'uns are more concerned about seeing the world, doing turtle conservation in Madagascar and going clubbing in Ibiza.

Un cha un cha un cha un cha un cha un cha un cha

Aya napa, aya napa, aya napa, skill

Un cha un cha un cha un cha un cha un cha un cha

Un cha un cha un cha un cha un cha un cha un cha

Un cha un cha un cha un cha un cha un cha un cha

Un cha un cha un cha un cha un cha un cha un cha

Aciiiiiiiiiid, aciiiiiiiid, aciiiiiiiiid, aciiiiiiiiiiiid

Un cha un cha un cha un cha un cha un cha un cha

Un cha un cha un cha un cha un cha un cha un cha

Un cha un cha un cha un cha un cha un cha un cha

Un cha un cha un cha un cha un cha un cha un cha

You're no good for me, I don't need nobody, don't need no one, that's no good for me...

Un cha un cha un cha un cha un cha un cha un cha

Un cha un cha un cha un cha un cha un cha un cha

etc etc all night, before buying a kebab then being sick

Very atmospheric post, Rich. I can smell the acrid sweat and see some shaven headed loon gurning his face off, sweat dripping from his brow, shirt open to the waist.......and in the corner of my eye, the girl who had ketamine dropped into her double vodka and coke is starting to lose consciousness, looking confused as her mind clouds and her friends are nowhere to be seen....

AAAAAAAAAHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHH!!!!!!!!!!

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Who's the chump from the Halifax going on about "we do this, and we do that". Why do the Halifax have to have an opinion on everything? They're a money lender - when did that give them sociology degrees?

The girl in the butchers could have told us as much as the Halifax muppet - and I'd probably respect her opinion more.

The satisfaction level of those in social housing will be good news for the chancellor, Gordon Brown, who last week announced details of his plans to give three out of four people the chance to buy.

I don't understand this. People are "satisfied" being in social housing - yet given the opportunity of a private home, they'd buy it? Ipso facto : they're not satisifed with social housing.

They should just start reprinting old Whizzer and Chips cartoons in the Guardian instead of passing this rubbish off as journalism.

Edited by stillill

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Well you've got to ask yourself if 'young' people are right to spend their money on seeing the world, nights out and Bacardi Breezers.

You are right.

I believe the Breezer/iPod/Cheap Flight generation are totally misunderstood. Their consumer goods - ipods, funky mobiles - etc. may make them look rich to middle-aged people but think about it.

An iPod can cost about £130 - you could spend that on a few pots of quality paints for your house. An elcheapo new sofa costs £499, a cheapo washer-dryer £300, kitting out a place with reasonable curtains is more than the iPod, cheapo carpets or flooring will dwarf the price of an iPod, even a suite of ikea junk will dwarf the odd bit of spending on an iPod. Not spending £130 on and iPod will not even scrape the surface of buying a house for £180k that was £60-70k in 1999.

iPods and funky phones are drop in the ocean. You could quite honestly say they are a badge of poverty for many people, as if their lives were not on hold due to the bubble they would probably not be buying iPods but more 'dull and worthy' household goods costing rather more.

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You are right.

I believe the Breezer/iPod/Cheap Flight generation are totally misunderstood. Their consumer goods - ipods, funky mobiles - etc. may make them look rich to middle-aged people but think about it.

An iPod can cost about £130 - you could spend that on a few pots of quality paints for your house. An elcheapo new sofa costs £499, a cheapo washer-dryer £300, kitting out a place with reasonable curtains is more than the iPod, cheapo carpets or flooring will dwarf the price of an iPod, even a suite of ikea junk will dwarf the odd bit of spending on an iPod. Not spending £130 on and iPod will not even scrape the surface of buying a house for £180k that was £60-70k in 1999.

iPods and funky phones are drop in the ocean. You could quite honestly say they are a badge of poverty for many people, as if their lives were not on hold due to the bubble they would probably not be buying iPods but more 'dull and worthy' household goods costing rather more.

Spot on.. 100% spot on...

all the news seems to be today is the older generations desperatly clinging to the self belief that their homes are worth the current percived value.

The resentment they sometimes show the young for not buying is laughable..

We are not buying because for the most part we cannot.

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iPods and funky phones are drop in the ocean. You could quite honestly say they are a badge of poverty for many people, as if their lives were not on hold due to the bubble they would probably not be buying iPods but more 'dull and worthy' household goods costing rather more.

Or conversely they are a badge of wealth. I rent, and it's substantially cheaper than a 25 year mortgage of any type. I don't have to buy all those household items as my landlord already has. Hence I have lots of spare cah for ipods, computer games, consoles, holidays, sports cars, motorcycles, etc., etc., etc. And I do own and enjoy all of this stuff. Can't say I feel poor. :D

Nomadd

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UN CHA UN CHA UN CHA UN CHA UN CHA UN CHA UN CHA UN CHA

I AM SORRY I AM HAVING TO SHOUT BUT IT IS VERY LOUD IN HERE - NO MATE I AM SORTED, THANKS - TO SOME EXTENT I THINK THE P!SS-HEADS ARE JUST CHAV SCUM WHO HAVE NOTHING BETTER TO DO WITH THEIR SAD, GODLESS LIVES. I ALSO KNOW PLENTY OF PEOPLE (IN THEIR 20S LIKE ME) WHO ARE DESPARATE TO "GET ON THE LADDER", BUT THEY ARE MAINLY QUITE COMFORTABLE MIDDLE CLASS.

I HAVE NOTICED A "SOD IT" ATTITUDE AS WELL. PEOPLE JUST LAUGHING AT THE RIDICULOUS COST OF OWNING. SOME FRIENDS HEADING OFF TO INDIA FOR A YEAR TO HELP KIDS, ETC ETC, STILL GOT STUDENT DEBT HANGING AROUND ETC ETC

WHEN YOU FACE UP TO IT NOT OWNING IS NO BIG DEAL ANYWAY. YOU ONLY NEED A GRANNY FLAT WHEN YOU RETIRE, AND HAVING LOVING KIDS IS MORE USEFUL THEN

THEY'RE PLAYING TECHNOTRONIC, I'M HAVING IT NOW

I CAN FEEL THE LOVE

OH NO, THEY'VE TURNED THE FOAM MACHINE ON

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Well you've got to ask yourself if 'young' people are right to spend their money on seeing the world, nights out and Bacardi Breezers.

Let's face it if you take the chance of home ownership away from them by pushing prices way too high of course they are going to spend their money elsewhere.

Who can blame them ? When you get to 70 the chances are you will remember saving turtles in Madagascar or learning to dive in Thailand. Doubt that you will remember that interesting mortgage payment you made in 2006!

As someone who has STR'd I don't miss home ownership and maybe the question all those hellbent on getting on the 'ladder' should ask themselves is 'just how much of my happiness in life depends on me owning my own home'?

:lol: My sentiments exactly, lets not get our thinking so skewed that home ownership equates to a worthy existence. I've also experienced both and beleive me, it's overated.

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Or conversely they are a badge of wealth. I rent, and it's substantially cheaper than a 25 year mortgage of any type. I don't have to buy all those household items as my landlord already has. Hence I have lots of spare cah for ipods, computer games, consoles, holidays, sports cars, motorcycles, etc., etc., etc. And I do own and enjoy all of this stuff. Can't say I feel poor. :D

Nomadd

Oh no...

Do you STILL think you are better off having rented for the last 20+ years Nomadd?

If you had bought in 1985 you would own the house by now. Hell, I ftbd in the mid nineties and I paid it all off by 2001.

Plenty of toy money available each month once you become an owner occupier. No more mortgage or rent for a start...

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I ALSO KNOW PLENTY OF PEOPLE (IN THEIR 20S LIKE ME) WHO ARE DESPARATE TO "GET ON THE LADDER", BUT THEY ARE MAINLY QUITE COMFORTABLE MIDDLE CLASS.

I HAVE NOTICED A "SOD IT" ATTITUDE AS WELL. PEOPLE JUST LAUGHING AT THE RIDICULOUS COST OF OWNING. SOME FRIENDS HEADING OFF TO INDIA FOR A YEAR TO HELP KIDS, ETC ETC, STILL GOT STUDENT DEBT HANGING AROUND ETC ETC

Well, I'm 26, not quite ready to buy my own place right now which is a blessing really in the current market conditions.

If I did want to buy now, I'd be pretty frustrated but as it is I can wait. I have a deposit for a house and no student debt. But I am happy to be spending my money elsewhere, after all I wouldn't want to be reading DIY books, papering and sanding every evening and weekends like some of my friends, well not just yet. I guess some of it is down to personality, those who have bought were ready to settle down etc. Although most of my friends still live at home with the parents...seems to be the trend these days.

I've decided that I'm pretty much sick of the treadmill of work, get taxed , work routine and am current saving up to head off round the world later in 2006. Partly because of being frustrated at this country in that if you are in your 20's and single your basically struggling to keep your head above water. I feel that I am actually one of the lucky ones who hasn't got the debts or student loans, have a deposit ready and am able to save to fund a year abroad trip.

I feel like the timing is right for me to do this before I get towards my 30's and have too much comitment in the sense of finances etc.

Yes, I am laughing at the cost of housing in this country and I am strangly interested in where the housing market is going to go from here, knowing people who have bought this year.

Also, laughing at the newly built 2 bed flats down the road from me going at 230k! Would be interesting to see how much they are in 12 months...

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I do think that there's more than hint of self-kidology going on here. It's brave of many of you to pretend that buying a home is not important to you, there are more worthy/interesting things to do etc etc.and I'm sure many of you believe it.

Many youngsters feel this way, I'm sure, but the fact that your on this forum does suggest that this is not really the case for you.

Let's be honest with ourselves and each other, you would like to be buyers, but these crazy prices are preventing/discouraging you, that's all.

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Let's be honest with ourselves and each other, you would like to be buyers, but these crazy prices are preventing/discouraging you, that's all.
For me it's a case of wanting to be proved right. Seriously, the "I told you so" factor will be... just amazing, better than sex.

It used to bother me, but no so much anymore. More important things in life.

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I'm definately not ready to buy, but I have been reading this forum for aleast a couple of years now. I find it compelling watching the market change, theres has been a major shift since I starting viewing it.

I find it amazing how people buy houses without actually researching the market, it hasn't seemed to bother people one bit....maybe the sentiment has changed of late.

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I CAN FEEL THE LOVE

OH NO, THEY'VE TURNED THE FOAM MACHINE ON

I went to a "foam disco" in Chippenham for my stag night. It was class.

The DJ persuaded some pi$$ed girls to take their tops off for a free bottle of wine. One got carried a way and stripped naked; I saw her later bitterly crying in a corner.

I nearly drowned in the foam when it started to pile up in the middle of the dancefloor (I'm only 5'7"!) and at the end of the evening, when they cleared the foam away, there were two inert 'corpses' left in the middle, being slapped around the face by mates (the corpses eventually got up and staggered out).

We emerged soaking wet into the bitter cold of 2am Chippenham, realising that taxis were unobtainable, and that we were ten miles from a warm bed.

Then my <GOD> of a best man confessed that he was sober and that he would drive us home.

I remember that evening in a bit more detail than the day I took out my first mortgage.

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I think older people have forgotton how much £250,000 is.....

If i had a pound for every forum post ever posted on this website over the past two years, i would only have £245,064, i would be still be £5000 short (38 ipods)...

I am still thinking about buying a property in slovakia outright with my my savings/deposit, depends how it goes with my slovakian GF...

Edited by moosetea

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How about anther perspective ....

What if I do want to own a house for the security I think it brings me? According to some on this site it should not matter - but to me it does.

What if I want to get married and have children in our own house? According to this site, I should be happy to rent and not be fixated on home owning. Fine, but to me I want to buy so as I get older I have a house I can call my own.

What if I am extremely p!""£d off at not being able to achieve this when the generations before me have been able to? Then being told by said generation that I should either mortgae to the hilt, or be contented with renting.

If home ownership is not important, then what would the view of a BTL landlord be - they are owners after all? Sorry, they have a different perspective - according to recent press some do it to make money for their pensions, whilst I have to be content with renting now and during my pension, etc....

So maybe I will give up my aspirations and go down a route of self indulgence ... and where will this lead me and the future of this country because we are now living a different life to those in the past ... uncertainty perhaps?

How can anybody plan for an uncertain future?

Just my view, please feel free to be critical!

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and in the corner of my eye, the girl who had ketamine dropped into her double vodka and coke is starting to lose consciousness, looking confused as her mind clouds and her friends are nowhere to be seen....

I'm in like flynn :lol::lol:

Special K always develops the relationship B)

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I'm going to be harsh here...but I feel most people of my generation and younger behave like fear-striken ostriches when it comes to saving (and ultimately buying a property).

The flight from housing is not to do with the ramped-up prices (that doesnt help of course) and it is to do with how much more materialistic our society has got in the last 10 years or so. Whn you consider it, it is staggering...

"Bling" wasn't even part of our venacular in 1995. "Grunge" was and although that's a glib comparison it's a telling one I feel.

So many people convince themselves that they 'must have' an ipod, a pc, a nice car...whilst the country had enjoyed relative affluence in the last decade the number of ways we are told to spend this money have trebled.

In this time we have seen "designer lifestyles" become an aspirational model for all (designer clothes, haircuts, cars, property, holidays, supermarket food, coffee houses)...just look at how everty newspaper has become a lifestyle magazine with assorted tabloid sections.

In this time we have seen technology explode (internet, digital technology, cameras, mp3, consoles). The internet is particular interesting...it added an entirely new universe for spending money and one that was very easy to become absorbed in.

Those that dont save (not just the young) have noone to blame but themselves. People piss away so much of their income on these transient things and they wonder why they cant afford to buy or get a deposit together.

I enjoy a lot of these things I should add, but everything in moderation...

...if I was at University now I'd write my thesis on the shift in economic outlook in society between 95-05...tieing it into trends in technology and music/fashion.

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I think this just has a lot to do with more money in the pocket DD. There's a lot of jokers out there no question, but they've always been around IMO. Fewer checks and balances to help them keep their house in order.

Some of my friends have just given up on ever owning a home as they can't afford it, no matter how they do the sums. But I don't think it fundamentally changes your spending habits.

I think that people are looking for some meaning in their life, and have realised that owning stuff doesn't really help you that much. So they go off on their travels to do something useful or just doss. What they really need to do of course is DRAG THEIR SORRY, HELL-BOUND ARSES TO CHURCH ON SUNDAY. HERE ENDETH THE LESSON.

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Yes, yes...you are so right.

There is definitely a crisis of identity amongst the younger generation. Although perhaps this is an epiphenomenon of affluence again...if we are looking for meaning in life it is because we can afford to!

I myself was complete fashion-victim a few years ago and you just get to a point when you the shopping is not going to answer the great questions life poses you. Funnily enough I considered going to church but thought most of the people there would irritate me.

I defintely feel I have a "god-sized hole" in my life...quite whetehr this needs to be filled by religion is a another matter. DEEP!

If I was writing the said thesis I think I'd describe the move to affluence as the "democratisation of wealth". Nowadays, everyone wants to be famous and this celebrity culture is fuelled by the fact that you can buy all the status symbols that signify fame/success/celebrity. Notice how all the designer labels have segmented themselves downwards so that you can buy Donna Karan jeans now for less than £100...okay they will be DKNY branded but nonetheless.

Conversely places like supermarkets have segemented downwards and upwards and created super-brands of food (organic, finest etc).

Never has there been an era when so many people have used money as a signpost for themselves.

This country is going to be ****ed when a lot of people are out of work...

Edited by DonnieDarker

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  • 301 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

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      • down 5% +
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      • up 5%



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