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In Europe, Fake Jobs Can Have Real Benefits

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http://www.nytimes.com/2015/05/31/business/international/in-europe-fake-jobs-can-have-real-benefits.html?_r=1

At 9:30 a.m. on a sunny weekday, the phones at Candelia, a purveyor of sleek office furniture in Lille, France, rang steadily with orders from customers across the country and from Switzerland and Germany. A photocopier clacked rhythmically while more than a dozen workers processed sales, dealt with suppliers and arranged for desks and chairs to be shipped.

Sabine de Buyzer, working in the accounting department, leaned into her computer and scanned a row of numbers. Candelia was doing well. Its revenue that week was outpacing expenses, even counting taxes and salaries. “We have to be profitable,” Ms. de Buyzer said. “Everyone’s working all out to make sure we succeed.”

This was a sentiment any boss would like to hear, but in this case the entire business is fake. So are Candelia’s customers and suppliers, from the companies ordering the furniture to the trucking operators that make deliveries. Even the bank where Candelia gets its loans is not real.

More than 100 Potemkin companies like Candelia are operating today in France, and there are thousands more across Europe. In Seine-St.-Denis, outside Paris, a pet business called Animal Kingdom sells products like dog food and frogs. ArtLim, a company in Limoges, peddles fine porcelain. Prestige Cosmetique in Orleans deals in perfumes. All these companies’ wares are imaginary.

I wonder if they have fake HR to come in and put shriking employees on capability and sacking people? They need to make it as realistic as possible.

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50 million pairs of frogs legs available en France

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The concept of virtual companies, also known as practice firms, traces its roots to Germany after World War II, when large numbers of people needed to reorient their skills. Intended to supplement vocational training, the centers emerged in earnest across Europe in the 1950s and spread rapidly in the last two decades. Today about 5,000 practice firms operate on the Continent, supported by government funds, with at least 2,500 elsewhere in the world, including the United States.

According to the article the "employees" don't get paid for their non work and the faux/virtual "businesses" are paid by the government. It's a sort of training scheme.

The article is published by the NY Times as if people in the US don't realise that it's also happening in the US. Some sort of displacement news written about the eu to indirectly inform US readers about what's happening in the US as well as in some other parts of the world?

Why not focus the article on the US - and then say that it's also happening in the eu?

If real UK companies won't train UK people maybe it would work in the UK - assuming there isn't something similar in the UK and nothing seems to have been reported to suggest that there is. Maybe real UK companies should fund it rather than the taxpayer.

Maybe the scheme hasn't been introduced in the UK because there aren't enough real companies. Plenty of pretend self employed though surviving on benefits and tax credits.

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Its not a bad idea. We used to have British Leyland, but now our Potemkin businesses tend to be in banking.

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Yes . at least a Marina/Allegro could run for 5 + years and be some sort of use.

Bankers have provided me with nothing and never will.

You must have had one of the better ones

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I wake up each morning and check up on my imaginary 100 BTLs, then I step into my imaginary Ferrari and go for an imaginary drive in the imaginary countryside. I stop off at the pub and order an imaginary steak, and an imaginary pint of the finest beer.

Imagination is a cure for depression!

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You must have had one of the better ones

People knock Leyland but their product were frozen from the time of the formation of BL.

I had a Maxi, it was dreadful. Under the skin it was based on a car of the sixties, the land crab.

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People knock Leyland but their product were frozen from the time of the formation of BL.

I had a Maxi, it was dreadful. Under the skin it was based on a car of the sixties, the land crab.

Well by British Leyland I probably mean't Rover, when it was clear that, post BMW, that it was only being kept alive to get Labour through a few elections.

I'd take issue with your comments on the Maxi. It was pretty advanced for the day, and based on mini tech with FWD and hydrolastic suspension, and transverse engine. It was one of the first hatchbacks!

However it looked a crock of shit, doomed to use the ugly 'land crab' door pressings, and central body section, made worse by Issigoni's rather idiosyncratic styling.

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People knock Leyland but their product were frozen from the time of the formation of BL.

I had a Maxi, it was dreadful. Under the skin it was based on a car of the sixties, the land crab.

My dad had a Marina for a while.

On the odd occasion I needed to borrow it the handling terrified me. It was like driving a pig on stilts. I used to get a headache from the concentration needed to keep it on the road, or even in a straight line.

A horrible machine.

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I wake up each morning and check up on my imaginary 100 BTLs, then I step into my imaginary Ferrari and go for an imaginary drive in the imaginary countryside. I stop off at the pub and order an imaginary steak, and an imaginary pint of the finest beer.

Imagination is a cure for depression!

I imagine that could be enjoyable.

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Well by British Leyland I probably mean't Rover, when it was clear that, post BMW, that it was only being kept alive to get Labour through a few elections.

I'd take issue with your comments on the Maxi. It was pretty advanced for the day, and based on mini tech with FWD and hydrolastic suspension, and transverse engine. It was one of the first hatchbacks!

However it looked a crock of shit, doomed to use the ugly 'land crab' door pressings, and central body section, made worse by Issigoni's rather idiosyncratic styling.

It was very practical to take down country lanes to give some burd a good seeing to mind. Better than my Escort van for that.

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