Jump to content
House Price Crash Forum

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

Mrs Bear

Teacher Who Can't Spell

Recommended Posts

Not that I suppose it'll be a surprise to many, but someone told me the other day that she found two correctly spelled words in her son's work mis-corrected by his teacher. I think he is in the final year of primary school.

One was 'lightning' , as in 'thunder' which she had corrected to 'lightening'.

The other was 'desert', as in sandy, which she had corrected to 'dessert'.

Both within a couple of pages of handwritten work.

When the mother raised it at a parents' evening the teacher said she thought her spelling was actually quite good.

The mother was subsequently ticked off by the head for 'inappropriately' raising it at a parents' evening.

How on earth do teachers with such poor spelling ever qualify? OK, don't bother answering - I know there are probably whole swathes of the educational establishment who still think it is elitist and 'anti-creative' to bother about such things.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Everybody screws up from time to time.. teachers are human but do need to pay special attention.

In their defence they probably spend too much time jumping through overly officious hoops and bureaucracy whilst dealing with feral parents and children to have much time for the niceties of teaching and attention to detail.

I would say it is a perfectly valid concern to raise at a parents evening though, as long as it is done tactfully and not confrontationally.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If it's any consolation, I know a retired teacher in her seventies whose spelling is pretty bad. She qualified in the early sixties before sloppy standards became the norm, and she's very far removed from the lefty teacher stereotype.

What annoys me more are teachers who think their word is law, without being aware of all the facts. For example, at school I had strip publicly torn off me by a music teacher who claimed I wasn't allowed to include a photocopied extract from sheet music in an essay, despite this being allowed under fair usage copyright law. Teaching seems to attract minor authoritarians who don't like their version of the truth being questioned.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Everybody screws up from time to time.. teachers are human but do need to pay special attention.

In their defence they probably spend too much time jumping through overly officious hoops and bureaucracy whilst dealing with feral parents and children to have much time for the niceties of teaching and attention to detail.

I would say it is a perfectly valid concern to raise at a parents evening though, as long as it is done tactfully and not confrontationally.

Of course they are human, and everyone makes mistakes, but personally I would not call such blatantly poor spelling a 'nicety'. To me it is a glaring shortcoming in one of the basics, particularly at primary level.

I would not feel quite so strongly about iffy spelling in e.g. a teacher of senior level maths.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As spelling and grammar have never been my forte, I have to say that I am not one to get too sniffy about it. Mrs Bear's examples of desert and lightning are a bit surprising; however, there might be the odd word as common I misspell. On hpc it would be more often carelessness as in their or there or even substituting similar sounding words like death and deaf.

I tend to get more uppity where I feel I am on a firmer footing such as may be geography and arithmetic. My geography teacher used to insist that the UK experienced its warmest and coldest weather at the solstice even though it actually comes a few weeks later because of sea temperatures etc.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ironically it was found out the one good teacher I had at the state secondary I attended for a couple of years had no qualifications!

Not sure they really matter. I assume they're some common-purpose freakshow nowadays anyway.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I would not call such blatantly poor spelling a 'nicety'. To me it is a glaring shortcoming in one of the basics, particularly at primary level.

Sorry, that was a bit tongue in cheek..

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As spelling and grammar have never been my forte, I have to say that I am not one to get too sniffy about it. Though Mrs Bear's examples of desert and lightning are a bit surprising; however, there might be the odd word as common I misspell. On hpc it would be more often carelessness as in their or there or even substituting similar sounding words like death and deaf.

I tend to get more uppity where I feel I am on a firmer footing such as may be geography and arithmetic. My geography teacher used to insist that the UK experienced its warmest and coldest weather at the solstice even though it actually comes a few weeks later because of sea temperatures etc.

It's the insistence that grated on me. I had teachers who would happily debate a point with you and, if necessary, agree to differ, but quite a few who just had fixed opinions on things that weren't up for debate. I guess they felt they would lose face if they weren't seen as the fountain of all wisdom.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As spelling and grammar have never been my forte, I have to say that I am not one to get too sniffy about it. Though Mrs Bear's examples of desert and lightning are a bit surprising; however, there might be the odd word as common I misspell. On hpc it would be more often carelessness as in their or there or even substituting similar sounding words like death and deaf.

You haven't entered a profession where you are expected to teach spelling to others. The way they teach Maths at my sons school is horrific. rather than learn times tables: "Once two is two, two twos are four, three twos are six..." instead they teach them to count up in twos and keep track on their fingers: "two, four, six, eight..." opening one finger out with each count. Why would you do that???

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You haven't entered a profession where you are expected to teach spelling to others. The way they teach Maths at my sons school is horrific. rather than learn times tables: "Once two is two, two twos are four, three twos are six..." instead they teach them to count up in twos and keep track on their fingers: "two, four, six, eight..." opening one finger out with each count. Why would you do that???

It could be that they dislike the idea of rote learning. I remember being very confused by multiplication tables, because I couldn't grasp the fact that all you had to do was learn them parrot fashion. I thought there was some technique or method that I wasn't doing properly.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It could be that they dislike the idea of rote learning. I remember being very confused by multiplication tables, because I couldn't grasp the fact that all you had to do was learn them parrot fashion. I thought there was some technique or method that I wasn't doing properly.

You will still have to learn by rote, but you'll spend your life working multiples out on your fingers. Lack of context is another big issue though. They launched into teaching fractions, by teaching them how to add and subtract fractions without ever going through how fractions relate to whole numbers. How kids cope if they don't have an adult outside of school to teach them maths, I don't know. Actually, I suspect most just never really learn as i have met plenty of people who cannot do pretty basic maths despite 20+ years in education.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You will still have to learn by rote, but you'll spend your life working multiples out on your fingers. Lack of context is another big issue though. They launched into teaching fractions, by teaching them how to add and subtract fractions without ever going through how fractions relate to whole numbers. How kids cope if they don't have an adult outside of school to teach them maths, I don't know. Actually, I suspect most just never really learn as i have met plenty of people who cannot do pretty basic maths despite 20+ years in education.

Oh so true and you have even put my struggle with pompous experts and how they often do not put stuff into context...probably because they cannot, and they have been very good at learning, only by being rather good at remembering stuff.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest eight

You will still have to learn by rote, but you'll spend your life working multiples out on your fingers. Lack of context is another big issue though. They launched into teaching fractions, by teaching them how to add and subtract fractions without ever going through how fractions relate to whole numbers. How kids cope if they don't have an adult outside of school to teach them maths, I don't know. Actually, I suspect most just never really learn as i have met plenty of people who cannot do pretty basic maths despite 20+ years in education.

The thing that always staggered me, even as a small child, were those of my peers who couldn't add say one million and one million together because "it's big numbers".

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My mum says my niece's work isn't corrected at all! A teaching friend said they correct words the kids should know how to spell but don't do too many else it's a depressing for the kids to have a full red page!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My mum says my niece's work isn't corrected at all! A teaching friend said they correct words the kids should know how to spell but don't do too many else it's a depressing for the kids to have a full red page!

My English essays used to come back butchered and bleeding with red ink, slightly deflating.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My anecdote about this.

English lessons, in my "O"-level year. A useless teacher who couldn't spell. A spelling test: spell 20 words read out by teacher, pass your paper to someone else to mark it.

Three out of twenty words, I had to correct her. In each case, we got into a long argument, only resolved when she looked in the dictionary. Each time, she was wrong. As was indeed inevitable: if I hadn't been sure, I wouldn't've had the confidence to challenge her.

Aren't teachers supposed to do some kind of preparation? How long could it have taken her to check 20 words?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

7/10

Aren't you misreading what he said? Clearly the words and the punctuation tell us the red ink was deflating. It does beg the question of what it is for ink to deflate: perhaps it's an idiomatic way of saying the ink was running low?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I remember that at age six I was furious with my teacher when she insisted that the missing word in the simile boy is to man as colt is to ....?....

was horse.

As an informed fan of Silver in The Lone Ranger I argued strenuously for stallion, but to no avail.

Funny what we remember.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Aren't you misreading what he said? Clearly the words and the punctuation tell us the red ink was deflating. It does beg the question of what it is for ink to deflate: perhaps it's an idiomatic way of saying the ink was running low?

Deconstruct the phrase or sentence:

"My English essays used to come back butchered and bleeding with red ink, slightly deflating."

In no fewer than two thousand words. Bonus marks will be awarded for extreme pedantry.

(40 marks)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • Next General Election   92 members have voted

    1. 1. When do you predict the next general election will be held?


      • 2019
      • 2020
      • 2021
      • 2022

    Please sign in or register to vote in this poll. View topic


×

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.