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Frank Hovis

Food For One Pound A Day

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She has stocked up on her food which includes eggs, vegetables, beans, chopped tomatoes, jam, porridge and coffee but feels a bit daunted by the task ahead.

http://www.gloucestercitizen.co.uk/ege/story-26385497-detail/story.html

I read this and it struck me that during the week I'm probably not that far off anyway. Breakfast: porridge (75p for a bag that lasts a couple of weeks), lunch is sandwiches with my home-made bread, and a quick tea can often be a 49p can of soup from Aldi or Lidl with homemade bread again, then maybe some homebrew beer at 30p a pint. Not bad without trying!

I'm not being negative on the story, this isn't the previous lecturing of those wasteful people spending money on food when they should be paying even higher rents and council taxes without complaint.

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I imagine £1 buys a deal more in most of the Third World than it does in Gloucester.

Even so, 5 days on £1/ day shouldn't be too difficult.

Just depends how much you want to eat, really

By just consuming rice, I could go 5 days on £1 (or nothing if push came to shove).

It would be more interesting if nutritional and calories targets were specified.

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She has stocked up on her food which includes eggs, vegetables, beans, chopped tomatoes, jam, porridge and coffee but feels a bit daunted by the task ahead.

So she's already stocked up on the food? What's she going to spend her pound on? Cake?

Getting 2000 calories for under quid is pretty tough. Rice and beans, mainly.

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I enjoy eating a mixture of fruit and veg, so wouldn't be able to do this - would only see this as remotely possible if you're basically living on bread or rice?

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Getting 2000 calories for under quid is pretty tough. Rice and beans, mainly.

Sunflower oil (99p at Aldi) 8840 calories.

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CO-OP Orange sticker madness. Thats my philosophy. Have to time your runs though.

Ssshh.... don't tell everybody about the Co-Op price slashing, let it be our little secret.

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I enjoy eating a mixture of fruit and veg, so wouldn't be able to do this - would only see this as remotely possible if you're basically living on bread or rice?

There are two ways around that. Frozen mixed veg - about a quid a kilo from Lidl, Aldi or Iceland. Don't both with Tesco's version - their frozen veg tastes rancid. Or if you have one, get yourself down to the local market at closing time on a Saturday. Often get carrier bags of bananas etc for a quid each.

I guess mine would go something like this:

Kilo of porridge oats - 75p (most supermarkets)

Half a dozen large free range eggs - 90p (Iceland or Aldi)

Discount bread - 3 loaves at max 15p each - so 45p

Jar of peanut butter - 70p (Tesco)

Two cans of beans - 2 at max 30p each (most supermarkets - so 60p

Rest on fruit and veg = £1.60

Spice things up a tad with some foraged stuff eg wild garlic.

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Value lard 250g 39p 2245 cal

Flour 1.5kg 45p 5520 cal

Sugar 1kg 59p 4000 cal

Eggs 15 150p 810 cal

Instant coffee 50p

Total 343p 12575 cal = 1796 cal/day

Leaves 357p for veg/fruit.Luxury!

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Value lard 250g 39p 2245 cal

Flour 1.5kg 45p 5520 cal

Sugar 1kg 59p 4000 cal

Eggs 15 150p 810 cal

Instant coffee 50p

Total 343p 12575 cal = 1796 cal/day

Leaves 357p for veg/fruit.Luxury!

A really big coffee cake?

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I imagine £1 buys a deal more in most of the Third World than it does in Gloucester.

Even so, 5 days on £1/ day shouldn't be too difficult.

Just depends how much you want to eat, really

By just consuming rice, I could go 5 days on £1 (or nothing if push came to shove).

It would be more interesting if nutritional and calories targets were specified.

I'm guessing only because they are prepared to buy raw ingredients in bulk. Because we are a densely populated country, with world class logistics, loss leaders, supermarket wars and European subsidies; basically the food (as we want it presented)...clean, bagged etc is probably the cheapest in the world bar none. I was amazed at just how expensive food was in other European countries when I have visited.

Of course some food is expensive, but we are one of the few countries with cost tiers...you can buy your Kellogg's corn flakes for two pounds at the corner shop or own brand for 30p at a supermarket..it's up to you.

There was a song on radio 4's' Dead ringers' last night re Tesco...we have lost 6.4 billion but remember those 6p baked beans...you owe us.

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I don't know if this is a reliable site or anything, I just searched for Morocco, as I remember a carrierbagfull of tomatoes cost about 10p

http://www.numbeo.com/food-prices/country_result.jsp?country=Morocco&displayCurrency=GBP

Recommended Minimum Amount of Money for food (2300 calories, Western food types)

Milk (regular), (0.25 liter) 0.12 £

Loaf of Fresh White Bread (150.00 g) 0.08 £

Rice (white), (0.10 kg) 0.08 £

Eggs (3.60) 0.24 £

Local Cheese (0.10 kg) 0.42 £

Chicken Breasts (Boneless, Skinless), (0.25 kg) 0.63 £

Apples (0.35 kg) 0.28 £

Oranges (0.35 kg) 0.14 £

Tomato (0.25 kg) 0.08 £

Potato (0.30 kg) 0.08 £

Lettuce (0.20 head) 0.05 £

Daily recommended minimum amount of money for food per person 2.21 £

Monthly recommended minimum amount of money for food per person

(assuming 31 days per month) 68.45 £

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Reading the thread title I find myself surprised that KFC haven't yet come up with a compelling offer along precisely those lines.

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I live on some benefits and some savings.

10 to 12 quid is enough for me for a week.

With what do you feed you mock pit-bull though?

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Fortunately there are no pit-bulls around here............just a cat which hides behind the sofa should someone visit.

Btw, 10 or 12 quid a week includes about 1.50 for cat food.

As I`ve said before this is a crime free area, it`s the privately owned properties that are in the greatest danger!

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The whole thing is a rather nauseating publicity stunt by 'Save the Children' to secure tithes from the simple-minded.

If that bag was serious about empathising with the 3rd-world poor, she would live on £1 a day for the next *year* (as we've demonstrated is entirely feasible in the UK), and send what she would otherwise spend on food out of her (no doubt ample) charity worker's salary to the aforementioned.

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I can never understand these things, is it less than £1 a day in actual terms or relative?

£1 a day is a lot of money in most countries, as mentioned it's possible to do in this country and can be reasonably OK if done with a bit of planning.

When i was in Sri Lanka recently we went to a few proper local places and so didn't pay tourist prices and you could eat a really massive meal for about 50p (I think even then there was a 'tourist tax' added), things in the local market were seriously cheap, you would have had no issue eating a decent diet on £1 a day there and Sri Lanka isn't a particularly poor country by regional standards.

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I don't know if this is a reliable site or anything, I just searched for Morocco, as I remember a carrierbagfull of tomatoes cost about 10p

http://www.numbeo.com/food-prices/country_result.jsp?country=Morocco&displayCurrency=GBP

Recommended Minimum Amount of Money for food (2300 calories, Western food types)

Milk (regular), (0.25 liter) 0.12 £

Loaf of Fresh White Bread (150.00 g) 0.08 £

Rice (white), (0.10 kg) 0.08 £

Eggs (3.60) 0.24 £

Local Cheese (0.10 kg) 0.42 £

Chicken Breasts (Boneless, Skinless), (0.25 kg) 0.63 £

Apples (0.35 kg) 0.28 £

Oranges (0.35 kg) 0.14 £

Tomato (0.25 kg) 0.08 £

Potato (0.30 kg) 0.08 £

Lettuce (0.20 head) 0.05 £

Daily recommended minimum amount of money for food per person 2.21 £

Monthly recommended minimum amount of money for food per person

(assuming 31 days per month) 68.45 £

Translating a budget based on fresh products that can be sourced and grown locally may be a bit misleading. As soon as the durham has to buy something the country can't produce I'm guessing the costs would become prohibitive for locals. I guess we benefit from a richly valued pound that can suck in imports at a fraction of their real value.

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I can never understand these things, is it less than £1 a day in actual terms or relative?

£1 a day is a lot of money in most countries, as mentioned it's possible to do in this country and can be reasonably OK if done with a bit of planning.

When i was in Sri Lanka recently we went to a few proper local places and so didn't pay tourist prices and you could eat a really massive meal for about 50p (I think even then there was a 'tourist tax' added), things in the local market were seriously cheap, you would have had no issue eating a decent diet on £1 a day there and Sri Lanka isn't a particularly poor country by regional standards.

Yep. slap up meal, 16 yo prozzy and still have change from 50p.

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