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Co-Op Group: Competition Means We Cannot Fully Commit To Fairtrade

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http://www.theguardian.com/business/2015/apr/19/co-op-group-competition-means-we-cannot-fully-commit-to-fairtrade

The Co-operative Group has told its members that it cannot make an enhanced commitment to stock Fairtrade products because of tough competition among supermarkets and its shift towards convenience stores.

The UK’s largest mutual made the remarks in response to a motion tabled ahead of the upcoming annual general meeting asking for the commitment to Fairtrade – for which the group has prided its link in the past – to be reiterated and also retain the long-term strategic objective that that if a “Co-operative product can be Fairtrade, it will be Fairtrade”.

Saying it could not back all elements of the motion, the board blamed the current financial position of the group and “the austere market climate we continue to face and the strategic direction of the business into convenience shops which naturally increases pressure on space and range”. The board – chaired since February by serial boardroom director, Allan Leighton – provides a supportive statement from Fairtrade.

No profits in ethics?

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Has anyone looked into what fairtrade is really about?

In how many places is it really any different to the open market?

And where it is different, who benefits? Clearly not the real poor - the landless peasants: they're more likely to be losers as more money for farmers drives land and food prices up. Is it in reality (like generations of housing policy in the UK) a big giveaway to selected winners that comes at the expense of marginalisation of the excluded?

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Has anyone looked into what fairtrade is really about?

In how many places is it really any different to the open market?

And where it is different, who benefits? Clearly not the real poor - the landless peasants: they're more likely to be losers as more money for farmers drives land and food prices up. Is it in reality (like generations of housing policy in the UK) a big giveaway to selected winners that comes at the expense of marginalisation of the excluded?

http://www.spiked-online.com/newsite/article/its-official-fairtrade-screws-over-labourers/15082#.VTS2LqFwbIU

Since reading that article I have stoppped buying fairtrade!

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Last time I investigated (on cocoa), fairtrade was anything but fair to the people at the producer end of the supply chain and I have never thought of it in a positive light since.

I actively avoid fairtrade products

Not that you should, but I do

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No profits in being a collection of well-meaning but useless collection of planks, who manage to award themselves quite high pay outs for their half-arsed work.

+1

Eloquently put

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