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Frank Hovis

Gratingly Bad Spoken English Errors

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Firstly my own confession:

I liked the the phrase "to all intents and purposes" when I first heard it; I thought it was great and would use it a lot.

But... I misheard it and for several years would blithely say "to all intensive purposes" with nobody correcting me until one day I saw it written down. Oops.

Chap at work frequently uses the phrase "moot point" in its proper sense. However he pronounces it, so presumably spells it, "mute point".

A written one so common that it's practically taken over is "just desserts" for "just deserts".

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"Less people" instead of "fewer people"

"Helps stop bleeding gums" instead of "helps stop gums bleeding"

"Vice-a versa" instead of "vice versa"

"Chomping at the bit" instead of "champing at the bit"

"Who from?" instead of "from whom?"

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"Less people" instead of "fewer people"

"Helps stop bleeding gums" instead of "helps stop gums bleeding"

"Vice-a versa" instead of "vice versa"

"Chomping at the bit" instead of "champing at the bit"

"Who from?" instead of "from whom?"

I've not picked up on that one; but you're quite right.

I may be guilty of "chomping at the bit" :unsure:

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I've not picked up on that one; but you're quite right.

I may be guilty of "chomping at the bit" :unsure:

Likewise.

Nelson from the TV series 'Mongrels' pointed it out in (I think) the Springwatch episode.

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There is no such thing as 'American English'.

Aloominum = aluminium

Nucular = nuclear

Boo-ey = buoy pron. boy

Those are the ones that really irritate me.

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There is no such thing as 'American English'.

Aloominum = aluminium

Nucular = nuclear

Boo-ey = buoy pron. boy

Those are the ones that really irritate me.

Do you hear English people say those?

I may be wrong but AFAIK they're actually right with aluminium; with the second "i" being a subsequent addition by us.

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Do you hear English people say those?

I may be wrong but AFAIK they're actually right with aluminium; with the second "i" being a subsequent addition by us.

IUPAC name is aluminium

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'Train station' = railway station

'Can I get...?' = may I have

'How's yourself?' = how are you?

'How's you?' = ditto

'Can I ask you to close the window?' = please close the window

'I'm going to have to ask you to close the window' = please close the window

'I'm going to have to ask that at this time, there is no smoking allowed' = No smoking allowed

'Them ones what you gave me' = those ones which you gave me

'End of' = this discussion is over

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I rather like the mistakes kids make when they read something they haven't heard, and mentally mispronounce it. I knew someone who thought 'misled' was pronounced 'mizzled' until she was virtually grown up.

My brother read voraciously when he was small, and as a result would say e.g. 'I know it was you, and you needn't denny it.'

Another of his that we still say in the family is 'Gribble-ater,' (as in Rock of)

One thing I hate (I know I'm a dinosaur) is people saying, 'I'm good,' when you ask how they are. I have never yet told anyone I wasn't asking about their conduct/virtue, but might just crack one day...

And 'outside OF' and 'meet WITH' - grrrr, both superfluous.

PS - on another forum recently, nowt to do with HP, some poor person was lamenting her mum's demise, when she meant her decline. Nobody pointed it out - she already had enough on her plate.

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One thing I hate (I know I'm a dinosaur) is people saying, 'I'm good,' when you ask how they are. I have never yet told anyone I wasn't asking about their conduct/virtue, but might yet crack one day...

Just say, "I know you're good, but are you well?"

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'Meet up with'

'off of'

'shear' instead of 'shire'. Ugh, that grates.

'Pleased to meetcha' instead of 'how do you do?'

People who reply 'I'm fine thanks' when you say 'how do you do?'

'Passed away' instead of died

'Passed on' - even worse

'Yeah, no'. - well, which is it?

'Oh. My. God.' - I'm sorry but that's not a sentence.

'Oh my actual God' - as opposed to which other God? Your virtual one?

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Firstly my own confession:

I liked the the phrase "to all intents and purposes" when I first heard it; I thought it was great and would use it a lot.

But... I misheard it and for several years would blithely say "to all intensive purposes" with nobody correcting me until one day I saw it written down. Oops.

Chap at work frequently uses the phrase "moot point" in its proper sense. However he pronounces it, so presumably spells it, "mute point".

A written one so common that it's practically taken over is "just desserts" for "just deserts".

I think we are all guilty of saying a phrase misspelt. By enlarge (by and large...correct)

I even got a Christmas carol wrong for years until I visited Prague....

Good King Wenceslas (last) looked out. Some how las became last and the King was phonetic Wencerles.

Amazing how many people think specific sounds like the ocean.

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People who say 'schtschoodent' instead of 'student'. WTF is that all about? And what happened to calling yourself an undergraduate? Or does that have too many syllables for today's yoof?

And when did school pupils start being called 'students'? I've even heard five year old children referred to as 'students'.

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It's not wrong but absolutely hate the word pardon. Beyond grating for me because it was the one thing the Bourgeois love to correct the errant schoolboy and bloody hell they did.

It's an ugly word beloved by bull necked builders shouting at each other and in upper class circles more reviled than c**t. Nothing wrong with what or sorry.

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A written one so common that it's practically taken over is "just desserts" for "just deserts".

In Gulf War 1, it wasn't unknown for members of the 7th Armoured Brigade to get "Dessert Rats" tattooed on their person in error

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"Less people" instead of "fewer people"

"Helps stop bleeding gums" instead of "helps stop gums bleeding"

"Vice-a versa" instead of "vice versa"

"Chomping at the bit" instead of "champing at the bit"

"Who from?" instead of "from whom?"

Good ones.

Would it not be "Whom from?" if it was a question?

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