Jump to content
House Price Crash Forum
Sign in to follow this  
interestrateripoff

The 2015 Good News Election Propaganda Thread

Recommended Posts

http://www.sovereignman.com/expat/scathing-assessment-the-uk-economy-is-a-ticking-time-bomb-16698/

Despite being an otherwise staid, traditional news service, the professional banking division of the Financial Times recently released an utterly scathing assessment of the British economy.

It was entitled, “The UK economy is a ticking time bomb,” and the editor didn’t pull any punches in completely shattering the conventional fantasy that ‘all is well’, and that advanced economies can simply print and indebt their way to prosperity.

I’ll quote below, emphasis mine:

“What is the problem? Quite simply, the key numbers are terrible. According to the OECD, after five years of ‘austerity’ the UK’s budget deficit is 5.3%, down from 11.2% in 2009.

“In other words, it has gone from being close to meltdown to a situation that is merely dreadful.

“Since the government is spending more than it earns, it is hardly surprising that it is borrowing more, and that the debt-to-GDP has risen from 68.95% in 2009 to 93.30% in 2013, again according to OECD figures.

Still everything is awesome, I believe the propaganda.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
UK industry output barely rises in February, suggests slower first-quarter growth

LONDON - British industrial output barely grew in February and the construction sector shrank, suggesting overall economic growth slowed in the first quarter, shortly before Britain is due to hold a national election.

O dear

But.....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

According to the front page of the express today Cameron is going to reduce immigration to tens of thousands :lol: - because he's listening to UKIP voters.

That sounds pretty cast iron.

Edited by billybong

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Labour and Conservatives tied at 33 percent, Conservatives up 2 percent from last poll

Breaking from reuters. Sounds like another hung parliament have any previous elections been as close as this so near the election?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Labour and Conservatives tied at 33 percent, Conservatives up 2 percent from last poll

Breaking from reuters. Sounds like another hung parliament have any previous elections been as close as this so near the election?

Yes, it does take a large dose of salt to accept Lab/Con are 'leading' when they are both polling sub-40% figures.

Both main parties are closed to 25% than 50%.

I don't remember another election being so undecided.

Neither such a dumb collection of promises.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Tories will have been disappointed by the reception their IHT bribe garnered over the weekend. Major policy announcement but Osborne's spending gaffe re. the NHS appears to have relegated it down the news agenda.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The pounds main decline was in 2008 and it's pretty much flatlined since then although it's now getting close to its 2009 low.

It'll be reflecting the unedifying prospect of more years with some cobbled together version of the LibLabCon.

Edited by billybong

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Labour manifesto is out today.


http://

www.labour.org.uk/blog/entry/the-labour-party-manifesto-2015

On homes


Building new homes

Britain is in the midst of the biggest housing crisis in a generation, with the lowest levels of house building in peacetime since the 1920s. Young people have been priced out of home ownership. Fewer affordable homes are being built, homelessness is rising, and millions face insecurity and poor standards in the private rented sector.

Everyone should be able to live in a secure home, whether they rent or buy. We will make sure that at least 200,000 homes a year get built by 2020 – almost double the current level – by implementing the recommendations of the Lyons Review. It is only by building more homes that people’s aspiration for home ownership will be fulfilled.

Our comprehensive plan to tackle the housing crisis will give local communities new powers to provide the homes they need, in the places they want to live. To help young people and families get on the housing ladder, we will give local authorities the power to give first call to first time buyers on new homes in areas of housing growth. And we will unlock a Future Homes Fund by requiring that the billions of pounds saved in Help to Buy ISAs be invested in increasing housing supply.

We want a housing market that rewards the building of high quality homes rather than land banking and speculation. So we will introduce greater transparency in the land market and give local authorities new ‘use it or lose it’ powers to encourage developers to build.
We will increase competition in the housebuilding industry by backing small builders, including through our Help to Build scheme, and by getting the public sector building again.

We will build more affordable homes by prioritising capital investment for housing and by reforming the council house financing system. We will give local authorities powers to reduce the number of empty homes, including higher council tax on long term empty properties. And to boost the housing we need, we will start to build a new generation of garden cities.

For the 11 million people who rent privately, we will legislate to make three-year tenancies the norm, with a ceiling on excessive rent rises. A ban on unfair letting agent fees will save renters over £600. We will drive standards up by creating a national register of private landlords.
Homelessness is the ultimate symbol of the housing crisis. Labour reduced homelessness by 70 per cent when we were last in office, but all forms of homelessness are back on the rise, with rough sleeping having increased by 55 per cent. We are committed to reversing this trend by tackling the causes of homelessness and rough sleeping.

It starting to sound like it's going to be another 5 years wasted on the house price issue - if they have anything to do with it.

Edited by billybong

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

On Europe.


Europe

Labour believes that our membership of the European Union is central to our prosperity and security. It is why we will work to change the EU, so that it operates in the best interests of our country. And it is why we will re-engage with our European allies to protect our national interest after five years of Britain being sidelined in Europe and isolated abroad.
The economic case for membership of the EU is overwhelming. Over 3 million jobs in the UK are linked to trade with the European Union, and almost half of our trade and foreign investment comes from the EU. Competing in the single market, with the best companies in the world, drives competitiveness and innovation for firms in all parts of our economy. And it helps boost the living standards of people across Britain, encouraging the inflow of capital and investment.
Our reforms will help deliver a Europe focused on jobs and growth, not simply more austerity and rising unemployment. Labour will focus on the completion of the single market and tougher budget discipline, including on those items where spending at the EU level can save money at the national level. That means driving reform of the Common Agricultural Policy and a Commission-led zero-based review of spending on EU agencies to reduce waste and inefficiency. We will not join the Euro, and we will ensure EU rules protect the interests of non-Euro members.
A Labour Government helped to introduce sensible measures at EU level to protect the rights of British workers, and we remain committed to fighting to protect these measures.
People coming to Britain from the EU to look for work are expected to contribute to our economy, and to our society. So we will secure reforms to immigration and social security rules, as well as pushing for stronger transitional controls, which will enable member states to manage the flow of workers for longer when new countries join.
We will also continue to open up EU decision-making, and implement institutional reforms to help build levels of trust among European citizens. We will work to strengthen the influence national parliaments over European legislation, by arguing for a ‘red-card mechanism’ for member states, providing greater parliamentary scrutiny.
Labour’s priority in government will be protecting the NHS and tackling the cost-of-living crisis. It is not to take Britain out of Europe. However, Labour will legislate for a lock that guarantees that there can be no transfer of powers from Britain to the European Union without the consent of the British public through an in/out referendum.
On Europe

My bold and italics.

A bit belated that commitment.

Transfer of lots of powers seems to have been pretty much fait accompli during NuLabour and the current government's terms in office.

Edited by billybong

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just a reminder at these times:

"Manifesto promises are not subject to legitimate expectation”

+1

Exactly.

Manifestos are issued shortly before an election to garner votes and then to be reneged on.

Nevertheless on housing (and maybe a few other things) they're due a glance because their "promises" on new home numbers etc are likely to be the absolute maximum they'll ever do in the last year of parliament - and they'll still renege on them.

Edited by billybong

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
For the 11 million people who rent privately, we will legislate to make three-year tenancies the norm, with a ceiling on excessive rent rises. A ban on unfair letting agent fees will save renters over £600. We will drive standards up by creating a national register of private landlords.

It starting to sound like it's going to be another 5 years wasted on the house price issue - if they have anything to do with it.

This could deter BTLers I suppose.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This could deter BTLers I suppose.

Quite possibly depending on the fine detail, when they implement it and if they don't change their mind.

Quite a few landlords might like the 3 years contract with no voids and regular rent increases. Not having to continually check new tenants etc.

It looks like there's no commitment to build any more new homes than the current lot in the early years of the parliament. Only 200,000 a year by 2020.

There's no commitment on the various props and subsidies etc implemented by the current government so in that respect it seems very much as you go. Nothing on toning down lending and nothing specifically on house prices - apart from young people being priced out

Edited by billybong

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/election-2015-32279977

Ed Miliband's "mission" as your prime minister would, he said, be simply summed up: "I will always stand up for you."

It was one of the most powerful speeches I've seen him make.

It was, though, the front page of the manifesto with its "Budget Responsibility Commitment" and "clear vow to protect our nation's finances" which revealed his greatest fear. How can he convince voters so soon after the Great Crash of 2008 to put Labour in charge of the economy again?

He promises a "triple lock ….everything in this manifesto is funded. The deficit will be cut every year. The books will be balanced and the national debt will be falling."

Excellent the deficit can fall along with the national debt.... Shrinking the deficit in a stagnant economy will be challenging, creating a surplus needs a miracle. Although I'm betting Ed is hoping most people will assume if the deficit is falling so will the debt. Sounds good. Utter b0110cks but sounds good.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • Next General Election   90 members have voted

    1. 1. When do you predict the next general election will be held?


      • 2019
      • 2020
      • 2021
      • 2022

    Please sign in or register to vote in this poll. View topic


×

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.